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MTSU 



SUMMER '99 

SCHEDULE BOOK 







Fee payment deadline Friday, May 1, 4:30 p.m. 

Classes begin Tuesday, May 1 1 . 

See pages 4-5. 

IDDLE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY t MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE 



SUMMER DATES: 



Session I: May 11-28, 1999 
Session II: May 31 - July 2, 1999 
Session III: May 31 - August 7, 1 999 



Session IV: July 6 - August 7, 1 999 
Session V: May 1 1 - July 2, 1 999 
Session VIII: May 11 - August 7, 1999 



Call TRAM to select your classes! • (61 5) 898-2000 (9-898-2000 on campus) 

Use WebMT to select your classes! • http://www.mtsu.edu 

Registration Help Line - (615) 898-5094 



Table of Contents 



Helpful Information 3 

Calendar (Important Dates for Summer 1999) 4 

TRAM or WebMT???/Summer Times 6 

Continuous Registration Using TRAM or WebMT 7 

Deadlines for Adding, Dropping, Withdrawing, Refunding .... 8 

Graduating Seniors and Graduate Students 8 

How Can I Determine Progress Toward 

Completion of My Degree? 6 

Students Placed on Academic Suspension 8 

Directory for Information (phone numbers) 9 

Distance Learning 9 

MTSU and TSU Educational Consortium 9 

Phone Numbers to Call for Help 10 

ENROLLING AT MTSU 11 

1. Admission or Re-Admission 11 

2. Academic Advising 12 

3. Class Selection by TRAM and WebMT 12 

Appointment Times 12 

Course Availability Information 12 

"Night and Off-Campus Classes 12 

4. Pay Fees/Confirm You Will Attend 13 

Summer Priority Registrants 13 

Fee Payment/Confirmation Deadlines 14 

Deferred Payment Plan 14 

Payment Methods 14 

How Do I Confirm? 15 

Financial Aid/Loans 15 

Third Party Sponsorship of Fees 1 7 

Returned Checks 17 

Registration and Other Fees 18 

General Information 19 

Auditing 19 

Bookstore Hours, Summer 19 

Change of Name or Address 19 

Class Cancellations and Changes 19 

Class Cancellations Due to Weather 19 

Confidentiality of Student Records 20 

Counseling and Testing Center 20 

Courses Required 20 

Drop Policy 20 

Grades by Phone or WebMT 20 

Graduate Courses 20 

Graduation Requirement 20 

ID Cards 21 

Measles Immunization 21 

Parking Permits 21 

Placement and Student Employment „ 21 

Raider FUNDS 21 

Retention Standards — Suspension of Students 21 

Selective Service 22 

Student Load and Enrollment Status 22 

Thesis/Dissertation 22 

Withdrawal from School 22 

Statementof Community Standards of Civil Behavior 22 

Academic/Building Abbreviations 23 



What lf...(TRAMAVebMT Help) 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES BEGIN 2 

Accounting, 25 
Aerospace, 27 

African-American Studies, 28 

Agribusiness and Agriscience, 28 

Art, 29 

Biology, 30 

BMOM, 32 

Chemistry, 33 

Computer Information Systems, 35 

Computer Science, 37 

Coop>erative Education, 38 

Criminal Justice Administration, 40 

Developmental Studies, 41 

Economics and Finance, 42 

Educational Leadership, 45 

Elementary and Special Education, 47 

Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies, 50 

English, 52 

Environmental Science and Technology, 56 

Foreign Languages and Literatures, 57 

Geography and Geology, 58 

Global Studies, 60 

HPERS,60 

History, 68 

Human Sciences, 70 

Journalism, 73 

Management and Marketing, 74 

Mass Communication, College of, 76 

Mathematical Sciences, 77 

Military Science, 79 

Music, 80 

Nursing, 81 

Philosophy 82 

Physics and Astronomy, 83 

Political Science, 83 

Psychology, 85 

Radio-TV/Photography, 87 

Recording Industry, 88 

Social Work, 90 

Sociology and Anthropology, 91 

Speech and Theatre, 93 

University Honors, College of, 95 

University 101, 95 

Women's Studies, 96 

Distance Learning Classes 

Evening Classes 

Off-Campus Classes 

Saturday Classes 

Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act 

Direct Deposit Form 

Course Selection Worksheet 

TRAM and WebMT Menus 

Campus Map inside back co\ 



Telephone Response At Middle* 

(615) 898-2000 (On campus: 9-898-2000) 

and 

WebMT 

http://www.mtsu.edu 

Register 7 days a week, 7 a.m.-ll p.m.— see calendar for availability 
Registration Help Line - (615) 898-5094 

*A touch-tone phone is required to use TRAM. 



nformation That Will Help You 



'lease Read Carefully! 

his booklet contains the schedule of courses for Summer 1 999 
icluding evening, off-campus, and distance learning courses, 
serves both undergraduate and graduate students. 

icademlc Advising 

on't risk delaying your graduation by taking the wrong classes 
' in the v^'rong order — see your academic advisor before 
>u select classes. If you don't know who your advisor is, see 
ige 9 and call the appropriate department or the advisor for 
jur college. 

chedule Book Changes 

vs course schedule book contains Information in existence at 
e time of publication. The University reserves the right to 
ake necessary changes at any time in costs, policies, adminis- 
itive procedures, and applicable state and federal laws. It 
ay be necessary for modifications to be made in the location, 
eeting times, and listed teachers of courses. See current 
iting of available sections at http://www.mtsu.edu/~records/ 
:hedule.html or WebMT. 

lotes - Specific Course information 

)me courses have special restrictions as noted in this schedule 
X)k and/or catalog. Please remember that you are responsible 
r being aware of these requirements when you register. Also 
e schedule notes at http://wvvw.mtsu.edu/~records/ 
:hedule.html. 

iolations 

ansactions made through TRAM and WebMT are monitored. 
:cess is controlled by a personal access code (PAC) and the 
jdent's social security number. Unauthorized use to alter or 
tempt to alter another student's personal access code or class 
hedule may result in disciplinary actions including suspension 
termination. Reserving seats in classes for those who have 
ter registration appointment times is prohibited and may 
suit in suspension or termination for all students involved. 



When IS Registration? 

Priority Registration is April 5-16. Selection of classes is 
almost continuous once Priority Registration begins. Remem- 
ber, the earlier you select your classes, the more likely you are 
to get the classes you want. If you are a current student, check 
the top right corner of your personal data form (PDF) for your 
date and time to register. You may register then or anytime 
thereafter during registration. Note on the TRAM and WebMT 
menus that you can do much more than register. If you lose or 
did not receive your PDF, access TRAM or WebMT for your 
assigned time. 

When ARE Fees Paid? 

The deadline for paying fees depends on when you choose 
your classes. You can pay or confirm that you will attend via 
TRAM, in person, or by mail. If your balance is a credit or zero, 
you can confirm you will attend on WebMT. Remember, if you 
receive any kind of financial aid or if your fees are paid by 
someone else (for example, your employer, a governmental 
agency, or through a graduate assistantship), the fee deadline is 
also your deadline for notifying the Business Office that you 
plan to attend (confirmation options on the TRAM and WebMT 
menus). If you don't meet the deadline that corresponds 
to the time you selected classes, your class schedule will 
be deleted. 

When DO I Register? 

Current students are assigned a specific date and time to 
register during Priority Registration April 5-1 6. 

New undergraduate students will be permitted to register 
beginning April 1 7. Follow the instructions received in the 
acceptance letter from Admissions. 

Former students (not enrolled Spring '99) readmitted for 
Summer '99 will receive registration clearance from Admis- 
sions. New Summer '99 graduate students will receive 
registration clearance from Graduate Studies. Classes can be 
selected as indicated. 



Important Dates for Summer Sessions 1999 

TRAM and WebMT hours - 7:00 a.m, - 11:00 p.m,!!! 

(except on fee payment deadline dates) 
Registration Help Line - (615) 898-5094 



April 5- Course selection for current, re enrolling, new 

May 7 graduate students, and new undergraduates 

with a previous degree. Registration times will 
be indicated on the information received prior 
to registration. Students may register anytime 
after their assigned times. (See times above.) 
After Priority Registration (April 5-16), 
newly admitted undergraduate students 
may register using TRAM or WebMT. 

April 1-21 Teacher, TBR, State, UT, and MTSU employee 

dependent discount forms (PC 1 91 B) must be 
turned in at the Business Office, Cope Admin- 
istration Building 1 03. Signatures on the 
dependent discount forms should not be 
obtained before April 1 . 

April 17-18 Registration option may be unavailable due 
to fee calculations and bill processing 

April 21- TBR, UT, and state employees (PC 191A) fee 

May 7 waiver participants can register. Turn in form at 

the Business Office, Cope Administration 
Building 103, by 4:30 p.m., May 7. 

April 24-26 Registration option may be unavailable 
after 5:30 p.m. due to bill processing 

April 27-28 Summer class schedules and fee payment 
forms mailed to student's permanent 
address 

April 28- Fee payment by mail. Mailed in payments 

May 4 must be postmarked by May 4. 

April 28- Fee payment by campus mail at Campus Post 

May 6 Office or the blue drop box at the west end of 

Cope Administration Building parking lot. 

Note: Do not put payment in Campus Mail on 

May 7. 

April 28- Summer fee payment in person, 8 a.m. -4:30 

May 7 p.m., Business Office, Cope Administration 

Building cashier windows 

Fee payment by credit card or check card on 
TRAM 

Confirm on TRAM or WebMT that you will 
attend if fees are paid in full by financial aid or 
other credits. Balance due must be zero or a 
credit to confirm registration on TRAM or 
WebMT 

May 6 Registration option may be unavailable due 

to grade processing 

Fee payment option unavailable after 1 p.m. 
due to grade processing 

May 7 DEADLINE for priority registrants to pay 

Summer fees: 8 a.m. -4:30 p.m., Business 



May 8-10 



May 10 



May 10-11 



May 11 



May 12 



May 13 



May 13- 
May30 



Office cashier windows. Cope Administration| 
Building. 

Fees for all summer sessions must be paid by 
4:30 p.m. on May 7 or class schedules will be 
deleted. Credit card or check card payments 
may be made on TRAM. TRAM and WebMT 
unavailable after 4:30 p.m. 

TRAM and WebMT available for students wh( 
have not previously selected Summer courses 
Fees due at Cope Administration cashier 
windows by 5:30 p.m. on May 1 2. 

Deadline to drop from ALL summer classes 

using TRAM or WebMT and receive 1 00% 

refund. 

1 00% refund deadline for Sessions I, V, or VII 

classes dropped on TRAM or WebMT 

Parking permits sold at the Parking Services 
Office. 

Sessions I, V, and VIM classes begin 
TRAM and WebMT available 7 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 
Late registration for Sessions I, V, and VII 
classes; $25 late fee charged. Fees must be 
paid by 5:30 p.m. on May 1 2. 

Sixty-five-year-old and permanently disabled 
students and 60-year-old students taking das 
for audit register for Summer Session I. No I; 
fee. Turn in form and pay fees at the Busines 
Office, Cope Administration Building 103 b> 
5:30 p.m. on May 12. (See p. 1 4 for times tc 
register for other sessions.) 

Last day to add Session I and V classes 
75% refund deadline for Session I classes 
dropped 

Fee payment deadline for students who 
registered on May 8-12, 8 a.m. -5:30 p.m., 
Business Office cashier windows. Cope 
Administration Building. Fees must be paid 
5:30 p.m. or class schedules will be deleted 
Credit card or check card payments may be, 
made on TRAM, 7 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Financial aid refund checks available at the 
Business Office, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. for studer 
enrolled in Session I classes. 
Graduate appeal applications due in Collegi 
Graduate Studies 



Open registration for students who have no 
previously selected classes for Sessions II an 
or who need to make schedule adjustments 
Fees due by Thursday, June 3, at 5:30 p.m 
(See p. 14 for specific deadlines.) 



h 



Open registration for Session IV. Fees due 

by Thursday, June 3, at 5:30 p.m. (See p. 14 for 

specific deadlines.) 

25% refund deadline for Session I classes 
dropped 

Undergraduate Academic Appeal applications 
due in Records Office by 4 p.m. 

Session I final examinations 

Registration option may be unavailable due 
to census reporting 

100% refund deadline for Sessions II and III 
classes 

Sessions II and III classes begin 

Late registration for Sessions II and III classes; 

$25 late fee charged. Fees must be paid by 

5:30 p.m. on June 3. 

Sixty-five-year old and permanently disabled 

students and 60-year-old students taking classes 

for audit register for Summer Sessions II and III. 

No late fee. Turn in form and pay fees at the 

Business Office, Cope Administration Building 

103 by 5:30 p.m. on June 3. (See p. 14 for 

times to register for other sessions.) 

Last day to add Session II classes, 7 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 
Last day for graduate and undergraduate 
students to file Intention to Graduate forms for 
August graduation. 

Fee payment deadline for students who 
registered on May 13-June 3, 8 a.m.-5:30 
p.m., Business Office cashier windows. Cope 
Administration. Fees must be paid by 5:30 p.m. 
or class schedules will be deleted. Credit card 
or check card payments may be made on 
TRAM. TRAM and WebMT unavailable after 
5:30 p.m. 

Last day to add Session III classes, 7a.m.-5:30 p.m. 
75% refund deadline for Session II classes 
dropped 

Registration for students who have not 
previously seleaed classes for Session IV or 
who need to make schedule adjustments. Fees 
dueby 5:30 p.m. on V^ednesday, July 7, 1999. 

Registration option may be unavailable due 
to census reporting 

75% refund deadline for Session III classes 
dropped 

25% refund deadline for Session II classes 
dropped 

Registration option may be unavailable due 
to census reporting 

25% refund deadline for Session III classes 
dropped 



June 18 Last day for filing theses and dissertations for 

August graduation 

July 1-2 Sessions II and V final examinations 

July 3 Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams begin 

July 5 Independence Day Holiday - no classes 

1 00% refund deadline for Session IV classes 

dropped on TRAM or WebMT 

July 6 Session IV classes begin. Registration option 

available 7 a.m.-l 1 p.m.; $25 late registration 
fee for Session IV classes. Fees must be paid by 
5:30 p.m. on July 7. 

Sixty-five-year old and permanently disabled 
students and 60-year-old students taking classes 
for audit register for Summer Session IV. No 
late fee. Turn In form and pay fees at the 
Business Office cashier windows, Cope 
Administration Building 103 by5:30p.m. on 
July 7. 

July 7 Last day to add Session IV classes, TRAM or 

WebMT7a.m.-5:30p.m. 
Fee payment deadline for students who 
registered June 4-July 7, 8 a.m. -5:30 p.m.. 
Business Office cashier windows. Cope 
Administration Building. Fees must be paid by 
5:30 p.m. or class schedules will be deleted. 
Credit card or check card payments may be 
made on TRAM. TRAM and WebMT unavail- 
able after 5:30 p.m. 

July 9 Second disbursement refund checks will be 

available at the Business Office cashier 
windows 9 and 1 1 for students who did not 
sign up for direct deposit . 

July 9 75% refund deadline for Session IV classes 

dropped 

July 1 Written Master's and Specialist's comprehen- 

sive exams begin 

July 13 Registration option may be unavailable due 

to census reporting 

25% refund deadline for Session IV classes 
dropped 

July 30 Last day to remove "i" grades for graduate 

students graduating in August. 

August 5 Sessions III, IV, and VIM final examinations for 

classes meeting Monday-Thursday 

August 6 Sessions III, IV, and VIII final examinations for 

classes meeting Monday-Friday 

August 7 Last day to remove "I" grades for undergradu- 

ate students graduating in August 
Graduation, Murphy Center 

August 23 Fall '99 classes begin 



fOTf: Courses are offered for sessions other than Sessions l-IV to accommodate special needs of some students. See departmental 
Mrses. 



TRAM or WebMT??? 

Two Ways to Register for Classes (and more)!!! 

In addition to TRAM, you can register for classes via the Internet on our WebMT system. 
You can drop or add classes, also. In fact, you can perform the same functions on 
WebMT that you can on TRAM (except pay fees by credit or check card). 

Now you can view course offerings, your grades, an entire transcript, your account 
balance, registration holds, your class schedule for the semester, and a degree audit. 
Everything you have been hearing on TRAM you can now see on WebMT and you can 
print the information from your computer. 

Should you use TRAM or WebMT? It depends. During Priority Registration TRAM may be 
somewhat faster for class selection. However, when classes begin, WebMT will be more 
accessible than the TRAM lines. If you are seeking classes that are available only on 
specific days or at specific times, WebMT allows you to narrow the search by entering 
those parameters on the screen. 




NEW SUMMER CLASS TIMES!! 



Standard class times have changed for Sessions 11, ill, and iV. 
New class times in Sessions 11 and IV allow 20 minutes 
between classes. New class times in Session ill allow 1 5 
minutes between classes. For further information, see course 
listings by department. 








fej 



Registration Help Line 
(615) 898-5094 



->v. 



Continuous Registration Using TRAM or WebMT 

7 days a week • 7a,m,'11p.m. 

TRAM - 898-2000 (on campus dial 9-898-2000) 

WebMT - http://www.mtsu.edu 

Registration Help Une - (615) 898-5094 

Attention: You must be admitted to the University prior to registering for classes. 



Once registration for Summer Term begins, it is antici- 
■pated that the telephone and web registration system 
jvvill be available seven days a week from 7 a.m. until 11 
jp.m. for students to register, drop/add, inquire about 
["lasses, etc. (See calendar on pages 4-5 for specific dates 
^nd times.) There will be a few days when the sys- 
items are not available due to bill processing, posting 
Isf grades, and census reporting. Every effort is made 
\[o have them available as indicated. However, un- 
scheduled interruptions may occasionally occur. 

Students enrolled or re-enrolled prior to April 1 7 are 
lissigned a specific time to register and may register at 
hat time or anytime thereafter. Current students who 
lave not received a PDF may call TRAM or access 
A/ebMT for their registration times. Students who at- 
;empt to register before their appointment time will be 
nformed of their assigned time. New students may reg- 
ster beginning April 1 7 following acceptance from Ad- 
Tiissions. 

Course Selection Procedures 

I. Consult your academic advisor aboiit proper 
course selection. 

I. Complete worksheet found in the back of this book. 

i. Register on TRAM or WebMT. Using a touch-tone 
telephone, call (615) 898-2000 (or 9-898-2000 if on 
campus). This is not a toll-free number. (TRAM is 
unavailable via some on-campus courtesy phones.) 
Or you may access WebMT at www.mtsu.edu at 
your assigned time 

Registration Tips 

Complete the worksheet found in the back before 
registering. Be prepared with a schedule that in- 
cludes accurate call numbers and alternate sections/ 
courses. You are responsible for registration fees for 
all classes added when fee is appropriate. 
NOTE: There is a time-out period if a se/ect/'on is not made. 



2. Students having a hold on their records may drop 
courses but may not add a course until the hold 
is cleared. Check the status of courses you wish to 
add before dropping other courses from your sched- 
ule. If possible, add before dropping courses. (This 
may not be possible in time-conflict or overload situ- 
ations.) 

3. If you do not plan to attend MTSU this term and 
you wish to drop from ALL classes, call TRAM or 
access WebMT by May 1 0. 

4. Students required to get a departmental permit 
or authorization must register for the course after 
approval is granted by the department. 

5. After the term begins on May 11 : If you are drop- 
ping a class and adding another class within the 
same session, the drop and the add must be pro- 
cessed before selecting a different session. The 
system cannot exchange the fees from the dropped 
class for the added class unless they are proc- 
essed at the same time. Fee exchanges are only 
allowed for classes dropped and added within the 
same session on the same day. The refund policy 
will be applied for a drop and add not within the 
same session. 

After your initial registration is finalized, if you 
add a class and decide not to attend the class, 
you must drop it from your schedule. Otherwise, 
you will be charged for the class and will be as- 
signed a grade of F for non-attendance. You will 
not be automatically dropped from that class by 
the Business Office. Your fees will be adjusted based 
on the refund policy in effect on the date of your 
drop. Please refer to the drop/add refund dead- 
lines in the calendar on pages 4-5. 

6. Other questions are answered on page 24. 

*Your PAC (Personal Access Code) is a confidential num- 
ber that will be used for all future transactions. PACs will 
not be issued to a third party. 



TRAM - 898-2000 (9-898-2000 on campus) 
WebMT - http://www.mtsu.eclu 



Deadlines for Adding^ Droppings Withdrawing^ Refunding 



Session 


Last Day 

to Register 

(late fee 

charged) 


Last Day 
to Add 


DeadI 


nes for Refunds 


Deadline to 

Drop or 

Withdraw 

Without a 


Deadline to 
Drop or 

Withdraw 
With a 




100% 


75% 


25% 




Classes begin 










Grade 


Grade of W 


, 


May 11 


May 12 


May 10 


May 12 


May 14 


May 13 


May 17 


II 


May 31 


June 1 


May 30* 


June 3 


June 7 


June 7 


June 14 


III 


May 31 


June 3 


May 30* 


June 7 


June 16 


June 14 


June 29 


IV 


July 6 


July/ 


Julys* 


July 9 


July 13 


July 13 


July 21 ' 


V 


May 11 


May 12 


May 10 


May 17 


May 24 


May 19 


May 31 


VIII 


May 11 


May 17 


May 10 


May 21 


June 1 


May 31 


June 21 



REFUND NOTE: Refunds for courses running for odd dates will be prorated per TBR policy. Fee exchanges are only allowed for classe 
dropped and added within the same session on the same day The refund policy listed above for each session will be applied for a drop am 
add not within the same session. 

WITHDRAWAL NOTE: Beginning May 1 1, withdrawals from all summer term classes must be processed at the Office of the Associate Dea, 
of Student Life, KUC 730, (675^ 898-2808. 

*These represent Sunday or holiday drop refund deadlines. Please note that withdrawals for these sessions must be processed on the Frida 
before these dates by 4:30 p.m. at the Office of the Associate Dean of Student Life, (615) 898-2808, to receive a 100% refund. 



Graduating Seniors and 

Graduate Students^ 

Please Note: 

To graduate in August 1 999, Intention to Graduate forms must be 
submitted by June 1 , 1999. 

If you plan to attend MTSU the term following graduation, you 
must file a re-enrollment form in either the Admissions Office or 
Graduate Office, depending on your student status. 

How Can I Determine 
Progress Toward Completion 
of My Degree? 

All undergraduate Students who enrolled at MTSU in the Fail 1995 
term or since are sent a degree audit statement just before prior- 
ity registration each fall and spring term. The statement is mailed 
to the campus post office box of those students who have a box 
and to the permanent address of those without a post office box. 

Courses and/or other graduation requirements not yet completed 
are listed to assist you in planning your class schedule for the 
upcoming registration. Advisors have access to the degree audit 
information on their computers. You may also access this infor- 
mation on the internet from the WebStudent Main Menu 
(www.mtsu.edu) or from one of the InfoMT kiosks located on 
campus. 



Notice to All Students Placed 
on Academic Suspension 
After Grading 

All students suspended at the end of a term who have pre-regi: 
tered for classes will have their schedules deleted for the pr< 
registered term(s). Undergraduate suspended students who wis 
to appeal to attend the Summer term must contact the Recorc 
Office, Cope Administration Building 1 06, for an appeal appllc; 
tion. The completed application must be returned to the Recorc 
Office by 4 p.m.. May 24, 1999; otherwise the appeal will n< 
be accepted. 

Graduate students must contact the College of Graduate Studie 
Cope Administration Building 1 1 4, for an appeal application. Tf 
completed application must be returned to the College of Cradi 
ate Studies by 4:00 p.m. on May 1 3; otherwise, the appeal w 
not be accepted. 

NO SHOTS— 

NO REGISTRATION 

See page 21 for further information. 



directory for Information 



Distance Learning 



lampus Operator 898-2300 

Ldmissions, Undergraduate 

lefer to page 1 for a complete listing of Admissions Services. 

ldmissions, Graduate 

lefer to page 10 for a complete listing of College of Graduate 
tudies Services. 

leneral Inquiries 

icademic Advisors - See the department of your major or 

Basic and Applied Sciences 898-5087 

Business 898-2328 

Education 898-5086 

Liberal Arts 898-5089 

Mass Communication 898-281 3 

Undeclared (freshmen) 904-8354 

Undeclared (others) 898-2670 

idult Services Center 898-5989 

ookstore, Phillips 898-2700 

usiness Office .' 898-2761 

Accounts Receivable 898-2167 

Third Party 898-2167 

Returned Checks 898-2761 

lampus Tours, College and Career Days 898-5670 

Counseling and Testing Center 898-2670 

)evelopmental Studies 898-2568 

)i5tance Learning 898-561 1/21 77 

inancialAid 898-2830 

jraduation Analysts, Undergraduate 898-2600 

lealth Services 898-2988 

lousing 898-2971 

iternational Students 898-2238 

jdicial Affairs 898-5822 

ibrary 898-2650 

^'lilitary Science 898-2470 

light Classes 898-5611 

)ff-Campus Classes 898-561 1/21 77 

'ecords Office 898-2600 

'cheduling Center 898-5800 

[tudent Affairs 898-2750 

RAM 898-2000 

[RAM/WebMT Help Line 898-5094 

ieteran's Affairs 898-2601 

t^ithdrawals 898-2808 



MTSU offers distance learning classes taught by various delivery 
methods. Distance Learning sections are taught on-line (internet/ 
e-mail), by compressed video, correspondence, telecourse, and 
by video/data conference. Further details may be found in the 
back under Distance Learning on page 97. 



MTSU and TSU 

Educational Consortium 

Middle Tennessee State University and Tennessee State Univer- 
sity have joined in an educational consortium to provide cross- 
registration opportunities for undergraduate students enrolled 
at each institution. MTSU students desiring to register for TSU 
courses should follow the procedures below. 



Obtain an "Agreement for Admission and Registration Form" 
from MTSU Admissions Office, Cope Administration Build- 
ing 208. 

Complete top of form. 

Have appropriate personnel certify accuracy of data on form. 
Register for MTSU courses; pay fees. 
Present form to Admissions and Records personnel at TSU. 
Register for courses at TSU, and present MTSU receipt; pay 
additional fees to TSU if any. 

The two consortium advisors or appropriate members of their 
staffs will provide information to ease in the transition and regis- 
tration between institutions. 

Tennessee State University 

Admissions Office 
Administration Building 103 
Tennessee State University 
John Merritt Blvd. 
Nashville, TN 37203 
(615)320-3725 

Middle Tennessee State University 

Admissions Office 

Cope Administration Building 208 

Middle Tennessee State University 

Murfreesboro, TN 371 32 

(615)898-5670 



TRAM - 898-2000 (9-898-2000 on campus) 

WebMT - http://www.mtsu.edu 

7 a.m.-l 1 p.m.i 7 days a week 

Registration Help line - (615) 898-5094 



For Help or Additional Information 




If you have questions, concerns, etc. with graduate or undergraduate admissions, 
records, registration, or your fee payments, please contact the following persons or offices 



Associate Vice President 
for Enrollment Management 

Cliff Gillespie, Associate Vice President for 

Enrollment Management 898-2828 

Donna Victory, Athletic Certification 898-5704 

Admissions 

Lynn Palmer, Director 898-21 1 1 

Freshmen 

(alphabetic breakdown by student's last name) 

A-Gn - Mary Evelyn Winsett, 

Admissions Clerk 898-5631 

Co-O - Shirley Whitmore, 

Admissions Clerk 898-2222 

P-Z- Lisa Johnson, 

Admissions Clerk 898-2199 

Transfer 

(alphabetic breakdown by student's last name) 

A-K - Darlene Waddeli, 

Admissions Clerk 898-2227 

L-Z - Andrea Moore, 

Admissions Clerk 898-2197 

Betty Pedigo, TSU Consortium/ 

Campus Tours 898-5670 

Janna Hill, Evaluation of 

Transfer Credit 898-5706 

Alice Hambrick, Evaluation of Transfer Credit 898-5974 

Sharon Thomas, Residency 

Classification 898-2235 

Tojuana Kendall, Military 

Service Credit 898-5484 

Whitney Rushlow, Admission 

Requirements Inquiries 898-2457 

Admission Requirements Inquiries, Transfer Issues .... 898-5684 
Jay Stallings, Admission Requirements, 

Residency Classification 898-2848 

Barbara Boswell, Academic Common 

Market 898-2239 

Records 

Sherian Huddleston, Director 898-2600 

Christi Farris, Enrollment 

Certification 898-2162 

Shirley Horton, Transcript Requests 898-5502 

Carolyn Holmes, Veteran's Affairs 898-2601 

Undergraduate Graduation 898-2600 

Scheduling 

Crickett Pimentel, Assistant Director 898-5800 

Connie Floyd, Drop/Adds 898-5800 

TRAM or WebMT questions 898-5094 



Graduate Studies 

Donald Curry, Dean 898-2840 

E. Ray Phillips, Associate Dean 898-2823 

Ronda Sullivan, Graduate Assistantships, 

Graduate Council 898-5897 

Karen Demonbreum, Scholarships and 

Faculty Research 898-2823 

Grace Prater, Liaison* for Accounting, 

Business Education, Economics and 

Finance, Management and Marketing, 

Computer Information Systems, 

Computer Science 898-284: 

Glenda Vandygrift, Liaison* for 

Biology, Chemistry, Engineering Technology 

and Industrial Studies, Mathematical Sciences, 

Vocational-Technical Education, Foreign Languages, 

History, Music, Sociology 898-549- 

Deborah Williams, Liaison* for Criminal Justice, 

HPERS, Human Sciences, Psychology 898-535: 

Kim Holder, Liaison* for Aerospace Education, 

Aviation Administration, Elementary and 

Special Education, Educational Leadership, 

English, Mass Communication 898-219 

Pansy Alexander, Receptionist 898-284 

'Graduate liaisons coordinate admissions, graduation, residenc 
etc. 

International Admissions 

Tech Wubneh, Director 898-223 

Mary Grace Rounion, Assistant Director 898-223 

Statement Questions 

If you think there is an error or if you have a question regai 
the charges or credits reflected on your statement, please co 
tact the appropriate department according to the listing belov 

Accounts Receivable 898-21( 

Athletics 898-24; 

Direct Deposit of Credit Balance 898-57 

Family Housing 898-28,' 

Financial Aid 898-28. 

Graduate Assistantships 898-58' 

Housing 898-29 

Optional Meal Plans 898-26 

Out-of-state Fees 898-22 

Parking Tickets 898-24 

RAIDER FUNDS 898-54 

Returned Checks 898-27 

Third Party 898-21 

Withdrawals 898-28 



10 



Enrolling at MTSU 

Becoming a student is a four-step process: 

1 . Admission or Readmission 

2. Academic Advising 

3. Class Selection by TRAM or WebMT 

4. Pay Fees or Confirm That You Will Attend 



Admission or 
Re-admission 



Jndergraduate 

rUDENTS IN RESIDENCE during Spring 1999 will be mailed 
PERSONAL DATA FORM (PDF) for registration for the summer 
:ademic term. 

DRMER STUDENTS who were not in attendance during Spring 
999 must complete a re-enrollment form. Registration infor- 
lation along with specific information concerning selection of 
asses will be mailed to those students re-entering Summer 1 999. 

LL NEW STUDENTS, including part-time students, must com- 
lete their admissions credentials and be accepted for ad- 
lission. General information, registration materials, and new 
udent registration information will be mailed to all accepted 
udents. Applications may be sent during registration, but large 
jmbers of last minute applications will cause processing delays. 



To better serve you... 

It is important that the Admissions Office personnel have 
sufficient time to process your application for admission to 
the University; therefore, persons applying for admission 
on May 10, 1999, or after may be requested to select 
classes during the late registration period. 



II first-time degree-seeking freshmen under age 21 must 
fesent official ACT scores prior to admission. The ACT exami- 
;»tion is available on the MTSU campus by contacting the Coun- 
fling and Testing Center, Keathley University Center 329, or by 
filing 898-2670. Additionally, ACT composite and mathematics 
|id English sub-scores will be used to identify students requiring 
pdemic Assessment and Placement Program (AAPP) assessment 
jr purposes of placement. Minimum requirements are that ap- 
icants under 21 years of age 

whose ACT composite score is 1 8 or lower must complete 
the AAPP Reading Comprehension test, 
whose ACT mathematics sub-score is 1 8 or lower must take 
the appropriate AAPP mathematics tests as determined by 
level of high school preparation in mathematics. 



3. whose ACT English sub-score is 1 8 or lower must complete 
the AAPP Writing Sample. 

First-time freshmen who are 21 years of age or older on May 1 1 
or transfer students without previous English or math course work 
will be required to participate in an additional testing program 
prior to registration. This additional testing program will help in 
course placement and may result in requiring some students to 
enroll in developmental courses as additions to their degree pro- 
grams. 

Students admitted with high school unit deficiencies in English 
and/or math must complete the appropriate AAPP test, be ad- 
vised by an academic advisor, and register to take appropriate 
course(s) upon enrollment to remove deficiencies. Developmen- 
tal Studies courses and courses taken to remove deficien- 
cies do not count toward the required hours to earn a de- 
gree. 

Questions concerning undergraduate residency should be 
directed to the Admissions Office in Cope Administration Build- 
ing 208 prior to registering for classes. 

Note to transient students: Registration at MTSU includes pre- 
requisite checking which may require validation of course 
completion. Students who are prevented from enrolling in a course 
due to a prerequisite, but have completed the prerequisite at 
another university, should present a transcript to the academic 
department of the requested course. 

Graduate 

A POST-BACCAIAUREATE STUDENT may receive graduate sta- 
tus by completing a graduate admissions application and submit- 
ting it to the College of Graduate Studies, 1 1 4 Cope Administra- 
tion Building. Once graduate status is declared (application en- 
tered on computer), a student is eligible to enroll in graduate 
courses at MTSU and registration materials will be mailed (per- 
sonal data form and schedule book). The granting of graduate 
status does not necessarily mean that one has been admitted to a 
graduate program. In most cases, the total number of graduate 
hours in which a student may register prior to admission into a 
graduate program is limited to 12 (6 in Elementary and Special 
Education). Curriculum and Instruction majors in Elementary Edu- 
cation must meet with an advisor prior to enrolling in graduate 
classes. Students pursuing an M.Ed, in Administration and Super- 
vision or an Ed.S. in Administration and Supervision or in Cur- 
riculum and Instruction in the Educational Leadership Depart- 



11 



merit must be admitted to the program prior to registration for 
course work. Students pursuing an M.Ed, in Curriculum and In- 
struction in the Educational Leadership Department must be ad- 
mitted to the program prior to the completion of 6 hours credit. 
Students applying to degree programs in Business Administra- 
tion, Accounting, or Information Systems who have not met ad- 
missions requirements cannot take graduate courses but may enroll 
in undergraduate prerequisites. 

A student must file a re-enrollment application if he/she breaks 
continuous enrollment (except summer term). If granted, the stu- 
dent may re-enroll for the identified term. 

For non-degree-seeking post-baccalaureate students, readmis- 
sion is generally routine and is granted by the dean of the Col- 
lege of Graduate Studies. For degree-seeking students, readmis- 
sion is not guaranteed. Each graduate program may have a spe- 
cific readmission policy; students should contact the appropriate 
department for information. Readmission requires the recom- 
mendation of a representative of the graduate program and ap- 
proval by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Some 
graduate programs regularly allow readmission if the "stop-out" 
period is no more than one year; others are more restrictive. 

AN ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY FORM must be filed 
and approved prior to completion of 24 credit hours or earlier if 
required by the graduate program (Criminal Justice 16 hours). 
Business majors must complete this form upon acceptance into 
the program. The candidacy form must be approved by the gradu- 
ate advisor and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 

Graduate residency questions should be directed to the Gradu- 
ate Office, Cope 1 1 4. See page 1 for the phone number of the 
graduate liaison for your program 



Academic 
Advising 



Undergraduate 

Students enrolled during the Spring Term 1999 should consult 
their advisors prior to registration. New students will receive their 
acceptance notification and a list of advisors who can help them 
select classes. 

Advisors are not required to sign the worksheets; however, all 
students should obtain their advice before scheduling classes. 



Graduate 

If you are a degree-seeking student not yet admitted to the 
graduate program of your choice, upon receiving graduate 
status you may register for classes. Please contaa an advisor prior 
to registration and submit all admissions materials as soon as pos- 
sible. If you have not been admitted to a graduate program, reg- 
istration will not be allowed once you reach the maximum hours 
allowed by the graduate program. (See above.) 

If you are a degree-seeking student admitted to a graduate 
program, please contact your assigned advisor prior to regis- 
tration. You must consult with your graduate advisor during your 
first semester to formulate your curriculum to be assured that the 
courses you take will apply to your program requirements. 



If you are a non-degree-seeking student, not all graduat 
courses are open to you. Non-degree-seeking students cannc 
enroll in graduate courses in the College of Business without pric 
approval by the director of Graduate Business Studies. Non-de 
gree-seeking students are blocked from enrolling in 700-leve 
courses. Consult with the department for specific information 




A Personal Data Form will be mailed to all students enrolled Sprir 
1999 prior to Summer 1999 registration. The PDF is mailed I 
the MTSU Post Office box for all full-time students and part-tin 
students who live on campus and have a box or to the perm, 
nent address for those who do not have a box. Your date an 
time to register is printed on the top right corner of yoi 
PDF. Current students who do not receive a PDF before Pr 
ority Registration should access TRAM or WebMT or cot 
tact the Scheduling Center. You cannot select classes if a di 
partment has placed a hold on your registration. Be sure to r 
solve that obligation before registration. Students who owe ar 
money to the University must clear debts before registr. 
tion will be allowed. 



Appointment Times 



Since all students cannot register at the same time, it is necessa 
to establish priorities in the assignment of registration times. F 
currently enrolled students, times are based on the number 
cumulative hours earned. Since registration occurs before tl 
end of the term, appointment times do not reflect hours attempU 
during the current term. If you attempt to register before yo 
assigned time, the registration system will remind you when 
register. 



Course Availability Informatio 



Open sections of courses and changes and additions are updal 
periodically on MTSU's web pages and take precedence ov 
information appearing in this schedule of classes. Consult t 
InfoMT kiosks and the web at http://www.mtsu.edu/-recorc 
schedule.html or via WebMT. 



Night and Off-Campus Classe 



Registration; It is not necessary to travel to the campus to reg 
ter for classes. Please select classes by calling TRAM at (61 5) 8^ 
2000 on any touch-tone telephone or by accessing our web n 
istration system at www.mtsu.edu. Refer to specific instructic 
for registration on page 7 of this book. 

Off-Campus Registration: Students taking MTSU courses tl 
do not meet on the MTSU campus should register by TRAM 
WebMT Fee payment deadlines and late registration fees zft 
ply to all students. (See Late Registration on page 14.) C t 
campus courses can be found on page 105. 



12 



Pay Fees/Confirm 
You Will Attend 



>e Payment information is also available at 
ttp://www.mtsu.edu/~bursarmt 




Important Changes 
for 
Summer 1999 Fee Payment 

and 
Financial Aid Disbursement 

Fee Payment Deadline: May 7, 1999 

Two options will be available for students to pay 
fees on May 7. 

• Business Office cashier windows, Cope 
Administration Building, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

• TRAM payment by credit card, 7 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Financial aid refund checks will be 
disbursed on Thursday, May 13. 

Refund checks will be disbursed beginning on the 
third day of class. Checks will be available for 
students enrolled in Session I classes on Thursday, 
May 1 3, at the Business Office in the Cope Adminis- 
tration Building from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Students can sign up to have their financial aid 
refund direct deposited to their bank checking or 
saving accounts. Direct deposits will be available 
beginning May 10-11 for students enrolled in 
Session I classes. (See Direct Deposit on page 16.) 

PC 191A students can register beginning April 21. 

See page 15. 



The Statement of Account should be reviewed carefully to make 
sure all information is correct. Any changes after the billing date 
on the statement will change the balance due. If there are ques- 
tions about your account balance, use the Determine Account 
Balance option on the TRAM Fee Payment/Confirmation Menu 
or access WebMT to determine your current balance before pay- 
ment is mailed. 

Students who pre-registered for Summer 1999 can pay fees by 
credit card or check card on TRAM or in person at the Busi- 
ness Office April 28-May 7. Payments can be made by cam- 
pus mail and drop box April 28-May 6. Mailed payments 
must be postmarked no later than May 4, 1999. 

If fees are paid in full by cash, check, or credit card, your regis- 
tration is finalized. It is not necessary to also confirm on TRAM. 
Your payment is your confirmation. 

Fees for all summer sessions must be paid in full before 4: 30 p.m. 
on Friday, May 7, or your schedule will be deleted from the 
computer. That means that if you want to take classes, you have 
to start the process of selecting courses all over again. You will be 
charged a $25 late registration fee if you register after classes 
begin. See page 14. The classes previously selected will not 
be reinstated. 

If your fees are paid in full by financial aid, third party, graduate 
assistantships, or other credits, you must complete the registra- 
tion process by confirming that you will be attending MTSU for 
Summer 1 999. To confirm/complete your registration, call 
TRAM or access WebMT and select the Confirm You Will A 
attend option in the Fee Payment/Confirmation Menu. See 
the menus in the back of this schedule book. Calling and 
listening to your classes does not complete registration; you 
MUST select the Confirm You Will Attend option. This will 
ensure that a code is entered in the computer to hold your 
classes. If your registration is not completed and a code 
entered in the computer before 4:30 p.m. on Friday, May 7, 
1999, your schedule will be deleted from the computer. 

All students who priority register for classes and decide not 
to attend MTSU should call TRAM or access WebMT by May 
10 at (615) 898-2000 to drop all classes from their record. 
Beginning May 1 1 , withdrawals (from all summer classes) must 
be processed by contacting the Office of the Associate Dean 
of Student Life. 



[>r Summer Priority Registrants: 

ee Payment Deadline for 

II Sessions Is Friday, May 7, 1999 

uring the last week of April 1 999, the Statement of Accounts/ 
ass Schedules for students who pre-register for Summer 1 999 
ill be mailed to the permanent addresses. 

udents who want their bills mailed to an address other than 
eir permanent addresses should come to the Business Office 
jfore April 1 5 to set up a special billing address. 

you have not received your bill by April 30, contact the Bursar's 
ffice at (61 5) 898-2761 or come by the Business Office, Cope 
[Jministration Building 103. Failure to receive a bill does not 
Jieve students of the obligation to pay fees by the due date. 



Fee Payment/Financial Aid 
Confirmation Options 

1. TRAM: April 28 -May 7, 1999 

Credit card or check card payment of registration fees 
by telephone. You can make either credit card or check 
card payments with Visa or MasterCard on TRAM. Most banks 
have check cards available through Visa or MasterCard which 
can be used on TRAM to pay registration fees. Call TRAM at 
(61 5) 898-2000 to pay registration fees by credit card or to 
use your bank check card to deduct the amount of your fees 
from your checking account. Try this TRAM feature for the 
most convenient payment method available. 



13 



2. TRAM or WebMT: April 28 -May 7, 1999 

Confirm registration. You must confirm you will attend if 
fees are paid in full by financial aid, third party, or other 
credits. Your balance after financial aid is credited must 
be ZERO or a credit balance to confirm your registra- 
tion. See the menus in the back of the book. Select the 
Confirm You Will Attend option. When you select this 
option, the system will enter a code in the computer to 
hold your classes and validate your registration. This 
option will be available through May 7 for students who 
pre-registered. It will also be available during all other 
registration fee payment periods during the summer. 

3. Mail-in payment: April 28 - May 4, 1999 

Payment for the exact amount of fees due must be accom- 
panied by the Business Office copy of the statement. Pay- 
ments must be mailed in time to be postmarked on or 
before May 4, 1999. 

4. CampusMail: April28-May6, 1999 

Payment can be mailed at the campus post office in Keathley 
University Center or at the blue Campus Mail Drop Box in 
the parking lot at the west end of the Cope Administration 
Building. Do not put payments in Campus Mail or the 
drop box on May 7. 

5. In person: April 28 - May 7, 1999 

Fees may be paid at the Business Office cashier windows in 
the Cope Administration Building by bringing the student 
ID and BOTH copies of the Statement of Account/Class 
Schedule. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 
Students must bring student IDs with them to pay registra- 
tion fees. 

Fee Payment/Confirmation Deadlines 

Course Selection 

April 5 - May 7 
May 8-1 2 
May 13 -June 3 
June 4 -July 7 



Late Registration Procedures 



Fee Payment/Confirmation Deadline 

May 7, 4:30 p.m. 
May 12, 5:30 p.m. 
June 3, 5:30 p.m. 
July 7, 5:30 p.m. 



Classes selected will be deleted from the computer unless 
registration fees are paid in full or registration confirmed 
by the fee payment deadlines stated above. 

You must make payment at the Business Office or call TRAM to 
make payment by credit card or check card before the fee pay- 
ment deadline. Mailed payments must be mailed in time to 
be received before the applicable deadline. Classes cannot 
be reinstated for payment received after the stated deadlines. 

Credit card or check card payment of registration fees can be 
made on TRAM from April 28 - July 7 anytime TRAM is opera- 
tional. TRAM is normally available seven days a week 7 a.m.-l 1 
p.m. except on stated fee payment deadlines and dates specified 
in the calendar on pages 4-5. 



Session 



Late 
Registration 



Fee Payment/ 
Confirmation 
Deadline 



I, V, VIII 

11,111 

IV 



May 11 
May 31 
July 6 



May12, 5:30p.nr 
June 3, 5:30 p.m. 
July 7, 5:30 p.m. 



Fees will be payable at the Business Office Cashier Win 
dows. Cope Administration Building, by the due dates show 
above. A $25 late fee vnll be charged if class selection is mad 
on or after the first day of class for that session. 

Graduate students who are not registered for the current terr 
and who wish to register after the deadline must receive ap 
proval from the department housing the program and the dea 
of the College of Graduate Studies. 



Deferred Payment Plan 



The deferred payment plan is not available during the summt 
term. This plan is only available during the spring and fal 



Payment Methods 



1 . Personal check or money order. Checb should be mad 
payable to Middle Tennessee State University and includ 
the student's social security number on the face of the checl 

2. Visa or MasterCard. Credit card or check card paymen 
can be made by telephone. Call TRAM at (61 5) 898-200 
(9-898-2000 on campus) to pay registration fees by cred 
card or to use your bank Visa or MasterCard check card 

3. Cash. Cash can be taken only at the Business Office CasI 
ier Windows, Cope Administration Building.' Do not ma 
cash. 

4. Financial Aid, Stafford or Direct Loan Credits, or Est 
mated (pending) Financial Aid. If your bill shows yoi \ 
fees will be paid in full by financial aid, you must confiri - 
you will attend before the fee payment deadline or yoi Id 
class schedule will be deleted. (See How Do I Confirm^ ,| 

5. Perkins or MTSU loan checks. If your loan is approved 
will show on your bill as estimated aid. All Perkins loa 
borrowers must come in person and sign promissoi 
notes before Perkins loan funds can be released. Coi if 

firm registration as soon as you get your bill, then come i •, 
sign notes and endorse checks at the Business Office (Cof i; 
1 01 ) on the first day you attend class. (1 

6. Loan checks - PLUS loans from banks and Stafford loar 
from banks that do not send funds by EFT. If your lendi 
sends loan funds in the form of a paper check, your lo< 
will not be available by the fee payment deadline on M; 
7. If you are scheduled to receive a PLUS or Stafford loi 
check that must be used to pay fees and your loan does n' 
show as estimated aid, go to the Financial Aid Office I 
May 5. You will need a deferment to hold your classes un 
your check is available. Refund checks will not be disburst 



14 



until the first day you attend class for that session. If your 
bill shows your fees will be paid by other aid and you 
can confirm your registration, wait until the first day 
you attend class to pick up your check. 

Employee Fee Waivers. PC 191 participants may register 
April 21 - May 7. Fee waiver forms will not be honored 
for classes selected before April 21. After class selection, 
completed fee waiver forms must be submitted in person 
to the Business Office {Cope Room 1 03) by May 7. Classes 
will be dropped if forms are not received by 4:30 p.m. 
on May 7. Students who register after May 7 must submit 
form by the next applicable fee payment deadline. 

Reduced Rate Registration (Senior Adult/Permanently 
Disabled). Under T.C.A. Section 49-7-113, a student 60 
years of age or older or permanently disabled may audit 
courses with no tuition charge. A student 65 years of age or 
older or permanently disabled may take classes for credit at 
a reduced rate of one-half the semester hour rate up to a 
maximum of $75.00. Registration under these programs is 
on a space-available basis. Therefore, senior/adult perma- 
nently disabled participants cannot priority register. 
Class selection under these programs should be processed 
on the first day of class for the session. After class selec- 
tion, authorization memos should be brought in person to 
the Business Office, Cope Administration Building 1 03, be- 
fore the fee payment deadline below. The late registration 
fee for these program participants will be waived. 

Summer 1999 
Senior Adult/Permanently Disabled Fee Waivers 



Summer 
Session 



IV 
V 
VIII 



Turn in Fee Waiver 
Class Selection Forms and Pay Fees by 



May 11 
May 31 
May 31 
July 6 
May 11 
May 11 



May 12, 5:30 p.m. 
June 3, 5:30 p.m. 
June 3, 5:30 p.m. 
July 7, 5:30 p.m. 
May 12, 5:30 p.m. 
May 12, 5:30 p.m. 



How Do I Confirm? 



f fees are paid by cash, check, or credit card, your registration is 
'alidated or finalized. It is not necessary to also confirm on 
■RAM or WebMT. Your payment is your confirmation. Stu- 
lents must either pay, confirm, get a deferment, or lose 
heir classes. 

f fees are paid in full by financial aid. Federal Stafford loans, 
ederal Direct loans, third party, or other credits, you must com- 
iilete the registration process by confirming that you will attend 
■ITSU for Summer 1999. To confirm you will attend MTSU 
his term and validate your registration, access TRAM or 
VebMT April 28-May 7, 1999, and do the following: 
On TRAM, select 3 for the Fee Payment Confirmation Menu; 
then select option 7 to Confirm Your Registration. 
On WebMT, select the Account Balance/Confirm Registra- 
tion menu, select Confirm Registration, then select Con- 
firm Summer 1999. 
ee the menus on page 1 09. Listening to or reviewing your classes 
oes not complete registration; you MUST select the Confirm 
our Registration option. When you select this option, the sys- 



tem will enter a code into the computer to hold your classes. 
If in doubt, try the process again, and the system will tell 
you if your registration has been confirmed. 

If your registration is not confirmed and a code entered in 
the computer before 4:30 p.m.. May 7, 1999, your class 
schedule will be deleted. Financial aid refunds cannot be 
processed until confirmation is completed. 

If you decide not to attend MTSU after confirming, you must 
withdraw from the University. See withdrawal information on 
page 1 9. 



Financial Aid/Loans 

Please read the following Instructions carefully if you have ap- 
plied for financial aid for Summer '99. If your financial aid has 
been approved. Estimated Aid (or pending aid) will show on 
your bill. (See detailed explanation below.) 

Estimated aid will not show for PLUS loans from banks or for Fed- 
eral Stafford loans from banks that are not an MTSU approved 
electronic fund transfer (EFT) lender. Note: If you choose a lender 
that is not an EFT lender, your bank will send loan funds in the 
form of a paper check. See No. 6 (Loan Checks) above. 

If your bill shows your fees will be paid in full by financial aid 
and/or Estimated Aid, you must confirm you will attend MTSU 
this term and finalize your registration before May 7, 1999, at 
4:30 p.m. or your class schedule will be deleted. (See How 
Do I Confirm^.) 

If fees will not be paid in full by the financial aid credits, the 
balance due on your bill must be paid before May 7, 1999, at 
4:30 p.m. You will be dropped from your classes if the bal- 
ance due is not paid. 

If you expect to receive financial aid for the term, but awards are 
not on your bill, contact the Financial Aid Office at (615) 898- 
2830 before May 5 so that problems can be resolved before the 
fee payment deadline. Financial Aid deferments can only be is- 
sued to students who have a Student Aid Report (SAR) with a 
valid Estimated Family Contribution (EFC)onfile. 

You may also call TRAM at (61 5) 898-2000 or access WebMT to 
check your account balance to determine If an award or loan has 
been credited to your account after your bill was printed. If your 
balance due is zero or a credit, you should confirm you will at- 
tend on TRAM or WebMT, (See How Do I Confirm?) 

What Is Estimated Aid? 

If financial aid credits show on your bill under Estimated Aid 
(pending aid), these are the amounts of Federal Stafford loans 
guaranteed, Direct Loans, Perkins Loans, scholarships, grants, or 
awards that have been approved for Summer 1999. The actual 
aid will not be credited to your account until immediately prior 
to the start of classes and/or until all required paperwork is 
completed. 

All Perkins Loan borrowers must come in person and sign prom- 
issory notes before Perkins Loan checks can be released. Con- 
firm registration as soon as you get your bill, then come to the 
Business Office, Cope 101, to sign notes on the first day you 
attend class. 



15 



Estimated Aid is for billing and confirmation purposes only. It 

is not actual aid. It has not been credited to your account. It is 
pending aid. If for some reason your actual aid is not pro- 
cessed after you are registered or if you withdraw or other- 
wise become ineligible before actual aid is applied to your ac- 
count, you will still be responsible for unpaid fees. Some of 
the reasons your actual aid may not be credited are that you do 
not sign your promissory note, you drop below the required num- 
ber of hours, you become academically ineligible, you do not 
make satisfactory academic progress, you do not complete all 
required paperwork, or you do not have your entrance inter- 
view. 

If you are a freshmen first-time borrower whose Stafford or Di- 
rect Loan has been approved, the Estimated Aid on your bill 
will include the amount of your loan disbursement that must be 
held for 30 days. 

If you have applied for a Summer-only Stafford or Direct Loan, 
the estimated aid will include the second disbursement. These 
funds will not be available until after the disbursement dates 
on the promissory note. Refund checks for the second disburse- 
ment will be available beginning July 9. 

LOANS— 

Federal Stafford, Federal Direct, 

PLUS, Perkins, and MTSU 

You must be registered at least half-time to be eligible to receive 
loan funds (6 undergraduate hours or 5 graduate hours). 

First-time borrowers and transfer students must have an en- 
trance interview before Federal Stafford and Federal Direct loan 
funds can be credited to your accounts. A feature available on 
TRAM will allow first-time loan borrowers and transfer students 
to complete their loan entrance interview by phone. (See the 
menus on page 109.) If you have not had an entrance interview, 
be sure to complete this requirement on TRAM to prevent your 
loan disbursement from being delayed. Do this as soon as pos- 
sible after you apply for your loan. 

If you are a freshmen receiving a Federal Stafford or Federal 
Direct loan for the first time, your loan funds must be held for 30 
days after you begin class. If your loan does not show on your bill 
as an Estimated Aid credit, you should make arrangements to 
pay your fees with either a check or credit card until the loan 
proceeds can be released. Freshmen should be prepared to 
buy books with their own funds. 

Bank Loans - Electronic Fund Transfer (EFT) 

Federal Stafford Loans from EdSouth, First American, First Ten- 
nessee Bank, First Union, and SunTrust are electronically trans- 
ferred directly to MTSU. Several other lenders send their loan 
funds electronically through Sallie Mae. 

Based on federal regulations, bank loan funds cannot be trans- 
ferred in time for the EFT loan credits to show on the bill you 
receive the last week in April. If you have returned your signed 
promissory note to your bank and your loan has been guaran- 
teed, your approved loan will show as Estimated Aid. 

When loan proceeds are received electronically from your bank, 
your loan will automatically be transferred to your student ac- 
count to pay Summer 1 999 registration fees, provided you are 
registered at least half-time, have had your entrance inter- 



view, have made satisfactory academic progress, have no fi- 
nancial aid holds, and are otherwise eligible to receive the 
loan. You must access TRAM or WebMT to confirm. 

Refund checks will be disbursed beginning the third da> 
you attend class for that session. Refunds will be availabU 
on May 13 only if you are registered in Session I, V, or VIII 
classes. 

How Do I Get My Financial Aid 
CREDIT BALANCE REFUND? 

If you have a credit balance due to financial aid, you must con- 
firm you will attend on TRAM or WebMT before your refunc 
can be direct deposited or your refund check can be processed 
Confirm as soon as possible after you receive your bill. (See Hon 
Do I Confirm?) 

Refunds should be direct deposited to your checking or saving; 
account. Direct deposit refunds for students enrolled in Session: 
I, V, or VIII who meet all other eligibility requirements and whose 
aid is credited to their accounts by May 7 will be available ir 
their bank accounts on May 1 or 1 1 . See below for dates fo 
other sessions. 

If you do not sign up to have your refund direct depositee 
to your checking account, you can pick up your refund checl I 
at the Business Office on May 1 3 if you are registered for Ses 
sion I, V, or VIII classes. See below for dates to pick up refunc ( 
checks for other sessions. 

Summer 1999 
Refund Disbursement Dates 

Refunds will be available for students enrolled in: 



Session 


Beginn 


ng Date 




Direct 


Refund 




Deposits 


Checks 




Available 


Available 


i,y VIII 


May 10-11 


May 13 


II, III 


May 31 


June 2 


IV 


July 6 


Julys 


Second disbursement 


July/ 


July 9 



NOTt: You must have an MTSU ID card to pick up any re 
fund check. NO EXCEPTIONS. If you do not have an ID, om 
can be made on the track level of Murphy Center. 

Direct Deposit of Financial Aid Credit 
Balance Refunds 

Avoid the lines! Save time! Get your refund two or 
three days before you can pick up a check! 
Use the form on page 108 to sign up now! 

Students who have a credit balance due to financial aid ma 
have the excess aid balance direct deposited into their checkin 
or savings accounts. If you apply for your financial aid early, mak 
satisfactory academic progress, have no financial aid holds, con 
firm your registration, and meet all other requirements, your re 
fund should be in your checking account two or three days be 
fore you can pick up a refund check. If you have a problem, yoi 
can still come and pick up your check in person. 

If financial aid has been credited to the student's account b 
May 7, the refund will be deposited into the student's bank acj 



16 



count and available for use on May 10 or 1 1 if the student is 
enrolled in a Session I, V, or VIII class and provided the student 
has met all financial aid eligibility requirements and has com- 
pleted all required paperwork. Students must confirm they 
will attend before their refunds can be direct deposited. 

Students must complete an authorization form at least 14 days 
prior to the day their first deposit is made. For the Summer term, 
the cut off date is April 29 for the refund to be available on May 
10 or 1 1 . Financial aid proceeds will not be transferred to the 
student's banking account without authorization. To obtain an 
authorization form, come by the Business Office in Cope Ad- 
ministration Building, Cashier Window 9, or Room 103, or call 
(61 5) 898-571 6. You can also obtain a Direct Deposit Authoriza- 
tion Form from the web at http://www.mtsu.edu/~bursarmt/ 
direct.html. Forms for Summer can be turned in anytime dur- 
ing the spring term prior to April 29. This authorization will re- 
main in effect until terminated by the student. 

Sign up for Direct Deposit and try the most convenient way to 
get your refund. 

Financial Aid Satisfactory 
Academic Progress Policy 

Middle Tennessee State University requires students receiving 
financial aid to make satisfactory academic progress toward 
completion of their degrees. Federal and state assistance pro- 
grams also have similar satisfactory academic progress require- 
ments. 

Satisfactory academic progress will be determined by the follow- 
ing criteria: 

1 . Students must pass sixty-six (66) percent of their attempted 
cumulative MTSU credit hours to remain eligible for finan- 
cial aid. Attempted hours include all courses for academic 
credit. A withdrawal from a course is considered as hours 
attempted if a student falls below full-time status. 

2. Students who withdraw from the University or who do not 
earn any credits during a semester will have their financial 
aid suspended immediately. 

3. Students are required to meet the following CPA standards: 

00-29.99 hours attempted 1 .5 GPA 

30.00-49.99 hours attempted 1.8 GPA 

; 50.00 or more hours attempted 2.0 GPA 

Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA. 
i. Maximum hour limitation on aid: 

a. Students may continue to receive aid through the at- 
tempting of 150 percent of the hours required for a 
degree. For undergraduates this is 1 98 and for gradu- 
ate students normally 45 hours. Students returning for 
a second bachelors degree must notify the Financial 
Aid Office of the hours required for the degree they 
seek. Students who attempt over 1 50 hours must com- 
plete a satisfactory progress appeals form each semes- 
ter letting the office know of their progress toward 
graduation. 

b. Credits transferred from other institutions will be in- 
cluded in the maximum hours attempted for a degree. 

c. MTSU will comply with all limitations on aid in the pro- 
grams it administers. 

>. Appeals. Students who do not meet the satisfactory progress 
criteria after two semesters are placed on financial aid pro- 
bation. During the probation period, a student is eligible to 
receive financial aid, but future financial aid will be held 



until all grades are posted for the probation semester. If sat- 
isfactory progress is not made while on probation, financial 
aid will be denied for one semester. However, an appeal 
can be made to the Financial Aid Office for extenuating cir- 
cumstances. Appeal forms are available in the Financial Aid 
Office. Students who return after being suspended from fi- 
nancial aid are placed on probation for subsequent semes- 
ters until they meet satisfactory progress requirements. When 
students fail to meet the requirements, they are suspended 
again until they file a satisfactory progress appeals form. The 
student is required to explain why satisfactory progress has 
not been maintained and what has changed to enable 
progress to be met. The form along with any documentation 
will be reviewed by the financial aid academic progress 
committee. Students who are suspended from financial aid 
will be sent a letter with the committee's decision. 



Third Party Sponsorship of Fees 

If you are a sponsored student (fees to be billed to an employer, 
government agency or foreign embassy, or paid through a gradu- 
ate assistantship), your account should reflect credits for the fees 
to be paid by your sponsor. If your statement does not show these 
credits, contact your sponsor to determine if authorization pa- 
perwork has been sent to the Business Office, or bring a fee 
authorization form to the Business Office during the early 
fee payment period. Payment, whether by check or by third 
party authorization, is required by the due date or your class 
schedule will be deleted. 

If your fees are PAID IN FULL BY THIRD PARTY or through a 
graduate assistantship (your balance is ZERO or a CREDIT BAL- 
ANCE on the statement you will receive), you MUST confirm 
that you will attend before the fee payment deadline or your 
class schedule will be deleted. (See How Do I Confirm?) 



Returned Checks 



Returned checks are subject to a $20.00 fine per check returned. 
Registration checks returned may result in a late registration fee 
of $25.00. The University does not redeposit returned checks. 
Any student who pays registration fees with a check which is 
subsequently dishonored by a bank will be administratively with- 
drawn and dropped from all classes if that check is not redeemed 
immediately with cash, money order, cashier's check, or certi- 
fied check. 

"NO MORE CHECKS"-"CASH ONLY" STATUS 

The privilege of making payments for fees and charges by per- 
sonal check and check-cashing privileges at Phillips Bookstore 
will be revoked for any student who has had more than one re- 
turned check within a twelve-month period for a period of one 
(1 ) year from the date the last check is redeemed. 

Any student who was previously coded "NO MORE CHECKS" 
and has another check returned will have all check writing privi- 
leges at the University permanently revoked. 

If your Statement of Account/Class Schedule says "CASH ONLY," 
send payment only with a certified check, money order, or 
credit card authorization. Do not pay your fees with a per- 



17 



sonal check. Your personal check will be returned to your post 
office box or permanent address, and your schedule will be 
deleted unless proper payment is received before the fee pay- 
ment deadline. 

A student paying in person will not be permitted to pay registra- 
tion fees by check if any previous check in payment of registra- 
tion fees has been returned. Students on a "NO MORE CHECKS"- 
"CASH ONLY" status should be prepared to pay registration fees 
with cash, cashier's check, certified check, or by authorized 
charge card draft. 



Registration and Other Fees 

NOTE: Fees are charged per hour for all classes. NO maxi- 
mum applies for summer registration fees. 

Summer 1999 Fees 
Sessions l-VIII 

The fee schedule below contains totals for registration and re- 
quired fees only. These totals do not include housing meals, 
books, etc. 





Undergrad. 


Undergrad. 


Grad. 


Grad. 




Tenn. 


Out-of-state 


Tenn. 


Out-of-state 


Hours 


Residents 


Residents 


Residents 


Residents 


1 


$117 


$328 


$161 


$372 


2 


$219 


$641 


$307 


$729 


3 


$321 


$954 


$453 


$1,086 


4 


$423 


$1,267 


$599 


$1,443 


5 


$525 


$1,580 


$745 


$1,800 


6 


$627 


$1,893 


$891 


$2,157 


7 


$729 


$2,206 


$1,037 


$2,514 


8 


$831 


$2,519 


$1,183 


$2,871 


9 


$933 


$2,832 


$1,329 


$3,228 


10 


$1,035 


$3,145 


$1,475 


$3,585 


11 


$1,137 


$3,458 


$1,621 


$3,942 


12 


$1,247 


$3,779 


$1,775 


$4,307 


13 


$1,347 


$4,090 


$1,919 


$4,662 


14 


$1,440 


$4,394 


$2,056 


$5,010 


15 


$1,533 


$4,698 


$2,193 


$5,358 


16 


$1,598 


$4,974 


$2,302 


$5,678 


17 


$1,683 


$5,270 


$2,431 


$6,018 


18 


$1,768 


$5,566 


$2,560 


$6,358 



Student Registration Fees 

In-state Residents 

Undergraduate 
Graduate 

Out-of-state Residents 

Undergraduate 
Graduate 

Debt Services Fee 
Technology Access Fee 
Student Activity Fee 



Per Hour 



$85.00 
$129.00 



$296.00 
$340.00 

$4.00/hr. 
$8.00/hr 
$5.00/hr. 



Charges for all course work will be assessed by course level. All 
fees are subject to change by the Tennessee Board of Regents. 



Postal Services Fee (non-refundable) $8.0(' 

(Required of all students registering for 1 2 hours or more) 



Recreation Activity Fee 

(Required of all students) 

ID Card Replacement 



$15.0( 



$10.0( "• 





Dorm Rent 




Housing 


Room 


Apartmen 


Sessions 1, II, III, IV, V 


$697.00 


$790.00 


Session 1 only 


$161.00 


$182.00 


Session ill 


$536.00 


$608.00 


Session II or IV 


$268.00 


$304.00 


Session 1 and II or IV 


$429.00 


$468.00 



Family Housing Rent (June and July) 

One-bedroom - $840.00 
Two-bedroom - $956.00 

Late Registration (non-refundable) 

Late registration fee of $25.00 will apply starting on the first da' | 
of class for each session: Session I, V, and VIII - May 1 1 ; Session 
Hand III -May 31; Session IV- July 6. 

Debt Service Fee 

This fee is a required part of registration fees. The money is ap 
plied to the retirement of bonds issued to build student servict^ 
buildings such as Murphy Center, Keathley University Center [^ 
and the Recreation Center. 



Technology Access Fee 

This is a required fee for support of additional technology serv 
ices for students such as computer labs and access to networl<s. 

Student Activity Fee 

This is a required fee to support the expansion and renovation o 
campus facilities. 

Recreation Activity Fee 

This is a required fee to support staffing and operating expense 
for the student recreation center 



Application Fees 

New Freshman and Transfer Students $15.0< 

(One-time non-refundable application fee must be submitted wit! 
initial undergraduate application to MTSU.) 

Re-enrollees 

(Application fee is not required for former students who apply t< 
re-enroll as undergraduate students.) 

Graduate Students $25.0( 

(One-time non-refundable application fee must be submitted wit! 
initial application for each graduate degree level.) 

International Students $30.0( 

(Graduate or undergraduate) 

Graduation Fees (non-refundable) 



Associate Degree 
Baccalaureate 
Master and Specialist 
Doctorate 



$25.0( 
$30.0( 
$35.0( 
$45.0( 



18 



'ost Office Boxes (non-refundable) 

'ost office boxes are required for all students registered for 12 
lours or more. After completing registration and fee payment, 

)art-time students may obtain a postal box upon payment of $8.00 
it the campus post office. A validated class schedule and fee pay- 
nent receipt indicating that you are a student must be presented 
fi order to obtain a box. 

tefunds on Course Work 

he amount refunded is determined by the date withdrawals are 
irepared by the Office of the Associate Dean of Student Life or 
he date Drop/Adds are processed. 

he amount of refund students will receive is as follows: 

A 1 00% refund to students who complete Priority Registra- 
tion by paying fees, but then withdraw through the Office of 
the Associate Dean of Student Life according to the sched- 
ule on page 8. 

A 75% refund to students who withdraw from school by 4 
p.m. or drop classes according to the schedule on page 8. 

A 25% refund to students who withdraw from school by 4 
p.m. or drop classes according to the schedule on page 8. 

lOTE: Refund for courses running for odd dates will be pro- 
ved per TBR policy. 

Withdrawals and drops must be processed on or before the dates 
iven on page 8 to be eligible for refunds. See the current un- 
ergraduate or graduate catalog for additional information. 

Withdrawals 

you do not plan to attend MTSU this term and wish to withdraw 
om ALL classes you selected, access TRAM at 898-2000 or 
WebMT. Withdrawals can be processed by TRAM or WebMT 
irough May 10. Beginning May 1 1, if you decide to withdraw 
om classes, contact the Office of the Associate Dean of Student 
ife at (615) 898-2808. Refund deadlines are listed on page 8 
nd in the calendar. Failure to comply will result in an automatic 
rade of F which will be recorded on the student's permanent 
;cord. 



General Information 



Auditing 

Students desiring to audit a class must designate Non-Credit when 
selecting classes. Otherwise enrollment will be for credit. Any 
request to change from audit to credit or credit to audit must be 
processed by the last day to add a class. Graduate students who 
request to change after the deadline must receive approval by 
the department chair and the dean, College of Graduate Studies. 

Bookstore Hours^ Summer 

The Phillips Bookstore (your University Bookstore) will extend its 
hours of operation for summer classes as follows: 

Session I, V May 11, 1999 7:45 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

May 12, 1999 7:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. 

Session II, III May 31, 1999 7:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. 

June1,1999 7:30 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

The Bookstore's regular summer hours are Monday-Friday 7:45 
a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Bookstore Refund Policy on Textbooks 

1 . A sales receipt is required for textbook refunds. 

2. Refunds on purchases for the Summer are indicated below: 
Summer I and V - by the end of the second day of class 
Session II - one calendar week from thefirstday of class 
Session III - two calendar weeks from the first day of class 
Session IV - one calendar week from the first day of class 

Change of Name or Address 

Students are responsible for keeping their names and addresses 
current on University records. Address changes may be made in 
the Records Office, Cope Administration Building 106, by call- 
ing 898-231 5, or via the web at www.mtsu.edu. A forwarding 
address should be left with the U.S. Post Office in addition to a 
change of address with the University. Important: All name and/ 
or address changes should be made early in the term to ensure 
they are processed in time to receive mail on a timely basis. 



Class Cancellations and Changes 

The University reserves the right to cancel any lower-division 
class enrolling fewer than fifteen, any upper-division or 500-level 
class enrolling fewer than ten, any 600-level class enrolling fewer 
than eight, and any 700-level class enrolling fewer than four stu- 
dents. It may be necessary for modifications to be made in the 
meeting times, locations, and listed teachers of courses. 

Class Cancellations Due to Weather 

To determine if classes are cancelled, students should listen to 
area radio and television stations; access the News and Public 
Affairs home page at http://www.mtsu.edu/~proffice (or click on 
"Events and News" from the MTSU home page at http:// 
www.mtsu.edu); or call the news line at 904-8215. A limited 
number of phone lines may make reaching the news line diffi- 
cult. Offices will be presumed open unless the announcement 
specifically states otherwise. 



19 



Confidentiality of Student Records 

Middle Tennessee State University regards a student's academic 
record as confidential. The release of information contained in 
the record is governed by Federal Law, known as the "Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act." Directory information such 
as the student's name, address, e-mail address, telephone listing, 
major fields of study, hours enrolled, participation in officially 
recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members 
of athletic teams, classification such as freshman or junior, dates 
of attendance, degrees, and awards received, and the most re- 
cent previous educational agency or institution attended by the 
student will be released unless the student has asked MTSU to with- 
hold such information. If you do not wish directory information 
released, you must notify the Records Office in writing. 

The law does provide for the release of information to autho- 
rized university personnel, other institutions engaged in research 
(provided information is not revealed to any other parties), and 
certain federal and state government officials. 

If you have any questions concerning the provisions of this act, 
please feel free to contact the director of records. 

Counseling and Testing Center 

The Counseling and Testing Center, Keathley University Center 
329, offers students help with career development through assis- 
tance in choosing a major. Other Center services include help 
with adjusting to college life, testing, and advising undeclared 
majors. 

Courses Required 

All students who took the Academic Assessment Placement Pro- 
gram (AAPP) test (or any portion of it) and who were placed into 
courses in the Developmental Studies Program must enroll in 
and complete the designated courses in sequence. Failure to enroll 
in the designated courses will result in the student's immediate 
withdrawal from the University. All full-time degree-seeking stu- 
dents should be enrolled in the appropriate general studies En- 
glish course and either six hours in general studies or three hours 
in general studies and three hours in their major until they have 
satisfied the University's general studies requirement. Juniors or 
seniors must have on file and follow a plan for major and minors. 
Students are permitted to take only one physical education ac- 
tivity course per term. 

Drop Policy 

To drop a class, access TRAM or WebMT and follow the instruc- 
tions. Students having a hold on their records may drop 
courses but may not add a course until the hold is cleared. 

Tennessee Board of Regents policy prohibits students from with- 
drawing from or dropping courses in the Developmental Studies 
Program. Under extenuating circumstances a course may be 
dropped with the approval of the Developmental Studies chai;. 
No student may drop a basic^developmental course without writ- 
ten approval of the Developmental Studies department chair- 
person. A student desiring to drop a course must contact his/her 
Developmental Studies advisor at 898-2339 (Peck Hall 102) to 
begin the process. Failure to comply will result in an automatic 
grade of R 

Students who stop attending a class but do not officially drop the 
class will be assigned a grade of F which will be recorded on the 
student's permanent record. 



Drop vs. Withdrawal 

Students who cease attendance but do not officially drop oi 

withdraw receive a grade of "F." 

To drop a course, a student must use TRAM or WebMT. The 
request can be processed if 

a. a student has completed a course in at least one session & 
the summer term 

OR 

b. a student will complete a course in at least one session o: 
the summer term. 

Students may drop all classes in all sessions by TRAM or WebMT 
and receive a 100% refund through May 10, 1999. Beginning 
May 11, students who wish to withdraw from all classes mus 
contaa the Office of the Associate Dean of Student Life, Keathley 
University Center, Room 1 30, 898-2808. See page 8 for othe 
drop and withdrawal refund deadlines. Students who withdrav 
do not have to reapply for admission to attend the next term. 

Grades by Phone or WebMT 

You do not have to wait for the mail to know your grades a 
MTSU. Call 898-2000 (9-898-2000 on campus) (TRAM) anc 
select the grade inquiry option to hear your grades for the cur 
rent term and previous two terms provided money is not owe( 
to the University. If you owe a student account balance whici 
prevents release of your grades, TRAM will provide an option t( 
allow you to pay your student account balance by credit card o 
check card (VISA or MasterCard) so that you can hear your grades 

Access WebMT at http://www.mtsu.edu and select Grade In 
quiry from the main menu. 

Grade reports are mailed only upon request. A printed cop' 
of the current term grade report may be requested by selectin; 
the appropriate option on TRAM or WebMT. This option is availa , 
ble for approximately ten days after final exams each term. One, 
the option to request a grade report is no longer available, in 
structions will be given for requesting a complete transcript. If .^ 
printed grade report is requested, it will be mailed to the perma 
nent address unless a different address has been designated fq, 
mailing grade reports. 

Graduate Courses 

Ordinarily only graduate students should register for courses num c 
bered 500 or above. However, any MTSU undergraduate stu'l 
dent having completed 98 semester hours of undergraduate cred k 
is eligible to take graduate courses. Students in Business Admin If 
istration. Accounting, and Information Systems are not eligible , 

Undergraduate students wishing to take graduate courses mu! 
obtain permission from the graduate program and the Office c ^ 
Graduate Studies, CAB 114. Permission is not guaranteed. Nc 
all graduate courses are offered to undergraduate students. 

Students may not enroll in 700-level courses in the department 
of Elementary and Special Education and Educational Leadershi 
unless they are seeking an Education Specialist or Doctor of Arl 
degree. Non-degree seeking students are not permitted to enro, 
in 700-level courses. j^. 

Graduation Requirement 

Notice to all Prospective August 1999 Graduates k 

Applications for graduation on August 7, 1 999, must be submi 
ted no later than June 1, 1999. The graduation list will beclosec * 



20 



hecked, and posted soon thereafter. Any or all undergraduate 
tudents may be required, as a prerequisite to graduation, to take 
ine or more tests designed to measure general education 
chievement and achievement in major areas for the purpose of 
valuating academic programs. Unless otherwise provided for 
n individual program, no minimum score or level of achieve- 
lent is required for graduation. Participation in testing may be 
squired of all students, of students in selected programs, and of 
tudents selected on a sample basis. 

1 order to comply with guidelines of the Tennessee Education 
Commission, the University requires all graduating seniors to take 

general education skills test, the ACT COMR The test is de- 
gned to measure a student's abilities in areas such as communi- 
ating, problem solving, and functioning within social institutions. 

is not designed to assess knowledge of a student's major field. 

he ACT COMP test will be given on June 1 and July 22, 1 999, in 
le Tennessee Room of the James Union Building. On each of 
lese dates, the test will be given three times: 8:30 a.m., 1 :00 
.m., and 6:00 p.m. Students are permitted to choose the date 
nd time which is most convenient. No pre-registration is neces- 
iry and pencils and test materials will be provided. 

D Cards 

he MTSU ID card identifies MTSU students, faculty, and staff for 
ccess to campus services and privileges. Use the MTSU ID card 
) check out books at the library; be admitted to the Student 
ecreation Center, campus computer labs, and residence halls; 
ish checks; buy tickets to campus events; receive student health 
!rvices; vote in student government elections; and pay for food 
a student meal plans. 

Du can also use the MTSU ID card as a debit card. Just deposit 
loney into a RAIDER FUND$ account (available through the 
ITSU Business Office). Then use your ID card rather than cash 
r checks for purchases at the campus bookstore, to pay registra- 
Dn fees, do laundry, buy a coke or snack, or to purchase meals 
; any of the food service locations on campus. To activate a 
AIDER FUNDS account, go by the cashier windows in Cope 
dministration Building. Contact the Business Office at 898-5443 
you have questions about RAIDER FUNDS. 

he ID office is located at Murphy Center, track level, northwest 
jrner. Hours at the ID office during non-registration times are 
londay through Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. (For evening stu- 
snts, ID cards are made in Peck Hall Room 101D. Call 898- 
511 for office hours.) 

lere is a $1 fee for replacement of lost or stolen IDs. If your 
ird breaks, bring the damaged card to the ID office and a re- 
acement will be made at no charge. 

leasles Immunization 

rfective July 1, 1998, the State of Tennessee requires stu- 
ents entering colleges, universities, and technical institutes 
ith enrollment of greater than 200 students to provide 
roof of two (2) doses of measles, mumps, and rubella 
liMR) vaccine on or after the first birthday, or proof of im- 
lunity to measles if date of birth is 1957 or after. 

)u will not be allowed to register for classes until an ac- 
'ptable form is on file in the Student Health Services Office. 

)r more information, contact McFarland Health Services, 898- 
}88. 



Parlcing Permits 

All motor vehicles operated on the campus of MTSU must be 
registered annually with the Parking Services Office. Any vehicle 
parked on campus must have a current valid parking permit dis- 
played in the vehicle. Beginning May 10, permits will be sold 
and vehicles will be registered at the Parking Services Office. 
Parking permits are also available after 4:30 p.m. in the Adult 
Services Office, KUC 320, or in the Evening School Office, Peck 
Hall 101D. To register your vehicle and purchase your parking 
permit, you must know your vehicle license tag number. For 
more information or clarification, refer to the Parking and Traffic 
Regulations. All permits will be valid through August 1 999. 

Placement and Student Employment 

Seniors and graduate students should establish permanent files 
with the Placement Center prior to graduation. Students seeking 
part-time employment should apply at the Center. Information 
and application forms are available in Keathley University Cen- 
ter 328. 



RAIDER FUND$— One Card That Does It All! 

A personal RAIDER FUNDS account, which is accessed through 
the student's colored ID card, is available to ail MTSU students. 
RAIDER FUNDS is a declining balance, money management pro- 
gram that allows students a convenient way to make campus pur- 
chases without the need to carry cash or the inconvenience of 
paying by check or credit card. 

The RAIDER FUNDS account can be activated by making a mini- 
mum deposit of SI 0.00 at the Business Office cashier windows. 
Additional information on the advantages and convenience of 
having a RAIDER FUNDS account may be obtained at the Busi- 
ness Office Cashier Window 1 1 in the Cope Administration Build- 
ing, by calling (615) 898-5443, or on the web at 
http://www.mtsu.edu/~bursarmt/raidreg.html. RAIDER 
FUNDS can be used to pay registration and other fees, buy meals 
directly or purchase meal plans, make copies in the library, oper- 
ate the washers and dryers in the residence hall laundries, get 
items from most campus vending machines, and purchase books 
and supplies at Phillips Bookstore. 

Retention Standards — Suspension of 
Students 

Undergraduate 

The minimum quality point average required to achieve the bac- 
calaureate or associate degree is 2.00 on all degree credit courses. 

A student failing to meet one of the following standards during 
any term will be placed on academic probation for the subse- 
quent term: 

1. attain a 2.00 CPA for current term, or 

2. meet one of the following retention standards: 
00-29.99 hours attempted 1 .50 
30-49.99 hours attempted 1.80 
50 or more hours attempted 2.00 

See current catalog for additional information regarding Devel- 
opmental Studies courses. 

Graduate 

The minimum grade point average (CPA) required to be eligible 
to receive a graduate degree is 3.00 for master's and specialist in 



21 



education students and 3.25 for doctoral students. A graduate 
student failing to meet the applicable minimum cumulative GPA 
retention standard as listed on the retention scale, page 30 of the 
Graduate Catalog, or whose cumulative graduate GPA is less than 
3.00 for three consecutive semesters will be placed on academic 
probation for the subsequent term. Probation in itself has no 
serious consequences other than to alert the student of potential 
academic problems and the requirement to (re)establish satisfac- 
tory academic status. Conversely, however, suspension is quite 
serious. Should a suspended student not be readmitted, it would 
result in termination of the student's graduate status. 

In addition to minimum GPA standards, degree-seeking students 
are expected to take appropriate graduate courses towards their 
degree objective, as determined by the graduate program. Non- 
degree seeking graduate students are expected to take graduate 
courses. In addition to the retention guidelines, the two-course 
repeat policy may result in a dramatically increased GPA. 

Six semester hours of C grade course work may be applied to- 
ward a master's or specialist's degree, but no courses with a C 
grade are acceptable toward the doctorate. Courses with a grade 
lower than C will not be applied toward any graduate degree 
requirements. 

Selective Service 

All male citizens of the United States of America born in 1 960 or 
thereafter must have completed Selective Service registration 
prior to registering for classes at MTSU. 

Student Load and Enrollment Status 

Undergraduate 

The maximum numberof hours credit for which an undergradu- 
ate student may enroll is 
Session I - 4 hours 
Session 11-8 hours 
Session III - 14 hours 
Session IV - 8 hours 
Session V - 8 hours 

Students who wish to enroll for credit hours in excess of these 
limitations must be granted approval by the appropriate dean as 
determined by the student's major Students may not take more 
tlian 18 iiours in the summer (total of all sessions). Violators 
of overload limits are subject to having course loads reduced. 

Graduate 

A normal full-time load for graduate students is 9 or more semes- 
ter hours; however, full-time status for students holding graduate 
assistantships is 6 semester hours. Graduate students are lim- 
ited to a maximum load of 12 graduate hours per term in- 
cluding summer. If an exception to this 12-hour limit is re- 
quested, overload forms must be signed by the graduate advisor 
and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 



Thesis/Dissertation Requirement 

Students enrolled in Thesis Research (664) and Dissertation Re- 
search (764) must sign up for at least one hour each semester 
(summer excluded) until the thesis/dissertation is complete. For 
master's students, a minimum of three hours is required for gradu- 
ation. (The Department of Sociology and Anthropology requires 



six hours). For doctoral students, a minimum of six hours is re-| 
quired for graduation. These courses are graded Satisfactory/Un- 
satisfactory (S/U). Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades are not used 
in determining the grade point average. However, they do count 
toward graduation requirements and are treated in every other 
respect as being equivalent to traditionally graded courses. 

Withdrawal from School 

See page 1 9. 



Statement of Community Standards 
of Civil Behavior 

Middle Tennessee State University is committed to sustain- 
ing an environment of tolerance for diversity among its stu- 
dents, staff, and faculty. In addition, the University acknowl- 
edges a responsibility for encouraging all members of the 
community to observe certain standards of civility in their 
interactions with one another The choice to associate one's 
self with this fellowship of scholars is freely made by each 
participant, but obligates those who do join to observe the 
following expectations for civilized conduct within the MTSU 
community: 

• the practice of personal honesty in all matters; 

• a positive regard for the dignity and value of each citi- 
zen in the community; 

• respect for the individual rights and possession of com- 
munity members; 

• disdain for bigotry and hatred expressed in any form or 
medium and directed toward identifiable groups or in- 
dividuals in the community; 

• tolerance for the convictions and opinions of others, 
even when not in agreement with one's own beliefs; 

• a recognition of community members' mutual needs 
and concerns and acceptance of a responsibility held 
in common to support the personal growth and efforts 
of each individual in furtherance of the well-being of 
the entire community. 



Schedule of Classes 
Code Abbreviations 



Class Meeting Days 

F - Friday 



M - Monday 
T - Tuesday 
W - Wednesday 
R - Thursday 



S - Saturday 

TR - Tuesday/Thursday 



22 



Academic Abbreviations 



African-American Studies 

Academic Success Program 

Actuarial Sciences 

Accounting 

Advertising 

Aerospace 

Agribusiness and Agriscience 

Anthropology 

Art 

Astronomy 

Athletic Coaching 

Athletic Training 

Business Administration 

Biology 

Business Law 

Business Education, Marketing Education, 

and Office Management 

Child Development and Family Studies 

Chemistry 

Criminal Justice Administration 

Construction Management 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Developmental Studies English 

Developmental Studies Math 

Developmental Studies Reading 

Developmental Studies Study Skills 

Economics 

Elementary Education 

English 

Environmental Science and Technology 

Engineering Technology 

Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 

Family and Consumer Sciences Education 

Finance 

Foreign Languages 

Foundations of Education 

French 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Graphic Communications 

Global Studies 

Human Sciences 

History 

Health 

Humanities 

Interior Design 

Industrial Education 



INFS 


Computer Information Systems 


ITAL 


Italian 


JAPA 


Japanese 


JOUR 


Journalism 


LATN 


Latin 


LS 


Library Service 


MATH 


Mathematics 


MC 


Mass Communication 


MCMT 


Management 


MKT 


Marketing 


MS 


Military Science 


MUSI 


Music 


NFS 


Nutrition and Food Science 


NURS 


Nursing 


PHED 


Physical Education 


PHIL 


Philosophy 


PHOT 


Photography 


PHY5 


Physics 


PLEC 


Paralegal Studies 


PR 


Public Relations 


PS 


Political Science 


PSY 


Psychology 


QM 


Quantitative Methods 


RATV 


Radio-Television 


READ 


Reading 


REC 


Recreation 


RIM 


Recording Industry 


RS 


Religious Studies 


RSE 


Basic Studies English 


RSM 


Basic Studies Math 


RSR 


Basic Studies Reading 


RUSS 


Russian 


S^FE 


Safety 


SCI 


Science 


SPED 


Special Education 


SOC 


Sociology 


SPAN 


Spanish 


SPEE 


Speech, Theatre, and Communication 


SPSE 


School Personnel Service Education 


STAT 


Statistics 


SW 


Social Work 


TRNS 


Transportation 


TXMD 


Textiles, Merchandising, and Design 


UH 


University Honors 


VTE 


Vocational-Technical Education 


WMS 


Women's Studies 


YOED 


Youth Education 


UNIV 


University 101 



Building Abbreviations 



Art Barn Annex 

Art Barn 

Airport 

Art Lab 

Alumni Memorial Gym 

Airport Teaching Facility 

Airway Science 

Business and Aerospace Building 

Boutwell Dramatic Arts 

Black House 

Cope Administration Building 

Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building 

Bragg Mass Communications Building 

Davis Science Building 

Ellington Human Sciences 

Ellington Human Sciences Annex 

Felder Hall 

Forrest Hall 

Horticulture Center 

Jim Cummlngs Hall 

Jones Hall 

James Union Building 



KUC Keathley University Center 

KOM Kirksey Old Main 

LRC McWherter Learning Resources Center 

LIB Todd Library 

MC Murphy Center 

MGB Midgett Business Building 

MTMC Middle Tennessee Medical Center 

PCS Pittard Campus School 

PHO Photography Building 

Pool Natatorium 

PH Peck Han 

ROTX ROTC Annex 

SAG Stark Agribusiness and Agriscience Center 

SFA Saunders Fine Arts 

TBA See Department Head 

TLC Tennessee Livestock Center 

VA Vocational Agriculture Building 

VH Vaughn House (Diagnostic Center) 

VIS Voorhies Industrial Studies complex 

WPS WIser-Patten Science Hall 

WMB Wright Music Building 



23 



Wha+ if... 



...I forget my Personal Access Code (PAC)? 
...my PAC number is not accepted? 
...I receive a message that "an error has occurred?" 
or "there is no matriculation for this record?" 

Contact the Scheduling Center at 898-5094. 

...a course is closed? 

Choose the course status option (4) on TRAM or access 
WebMT or CWIS (frank users) for open sections. If a 
section is closed, TRAM will indicate other sections of 
that course with the meeting time. If none exist, 
TRAM will indicate sections meeting at other times. 

...a course is restricted? 

Some course sections require departmental permission 
before registration. Contact the academic department 
for permission; then access TRAM or WebMT to 
register. Some courses require specific course prereq- 
uisites or have other registration controls which require 
that students have specific majors, classification, 
candidacy, etc. before registration can occur. Check 
the current catalog for prerequisite or other require- 
ments. If you have met the requirements and still have 
problems during registration, please contact the 
academic department of the course. 

...I need a call number for a course added after the 
schedule book was printed? 

View added sections on the web at 
http://www.mtsu.edu/~records/clasched.html under 
"Changes" or contact the academic department 
(phone numbers are with class listings in this schedule 
book). 

...I can't find an alternate course? 

Contact your academic advisor or the department of 
your major. 

...I choose courses with conflicting times? 

Normally TRAM and WebMT will not allow registra- 
tion for courses with time conflicts. To be allowed to 
register with a time conflict, bring written permission 
from the instructor of the conflicting class to the 
Scheduling Center to process the registration. 

...I enter an incorrect call number? 

Drop the incorrect course if you are enrolled and then 
enter the correct call number. 



...I need a printout of my schedule? 

Your schedule will be printed on your bill. You may 
verify your schedule on TRAM or WebMT; also, you 
can access the InfoMT kiosks in the library, KUC, BAS 
and the Rec Center. , 

...I get a continuous ring using TRAM? Or get 
disconnected? 

For constant rings, hang up and call again or contact 
the Scheduling Center at 898-5094. Do not use rediat 
For accidental or unexpected disconnections, try your 
call again. Courses you selected will not be lost unless 
you are a student taking Developmental Studies classe 
and you did not register for all required courses. 
Drops are not processed on TRAM if you hang up pric 
to TRAM listing the courses that have been dropped. 

I 

...I need to register for an overload of classes? 

Undergraduates - Obtain permission from the dean Ci 
the college of your major. After the dean's office 
updates your record, resume registration on TRAM or 
WebMT 

Graduates - Obtain signed overload form from your 
advisor and deliver to the dean of the College of 
Graduate Studies. After the Graduate office updates 
your record, resume registration on TRAM or WebMT 
Overloads will not allow entry into closed classes. 

...I have a hold preventing registration? 

Holds must be resolved before registration. TRAM/ 
WebMT will indicate which department has a hold on 
your record. After clearing the hold, resume registra- 
tion. 

...I have problems using WebMT? 

Call the registration help line at 898-5094 or report th' 
problem via e-mail on the WebMT Support Request 
Form at the following web address: 
http://www.mtsu.edu/~webepos/webmtfrm.html 

WebMT Help Suggestions are located at the end of th 
WebMT Support Request Form. Remember to click on 
"Continue" or "Submit Request" buttons to navigate 
through WebMT; do not hit "Enter" on the keyboard 
Remember to "Sign Off and Exit" when finished on 
WebMT 



24 



ITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID MRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Accounting 

Dr. W. Kenneth Harmon, Business and Aerospace Building N425C, 898-2558 

NOTE: Freshman and sophomore students should not enroll in 300- or 400-level Accounting courses. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

00207 BLAW-0499-01 

iession I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Iccounting - Undergraduate 

llTROD TO ACTG 

RIN OF ACTG I 

■flIN OF ACTG I 

RIN OF ACTG II 

jJRVEY OF ACCTG GEN BUS 

iljRVEY OF ACCTG GEN BUS 

JANAGERIAL ACTG 

teTG APPL FOR MICROS 



00019 


ACTG-0111-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S341 


HARPER P 


00020 


ACTG-0211-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S330 


HARMON W 


00021 


ACTG-0211-02 


3 


MTWR 


0540PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S330 


HARPER B 


00025 


ACTG-02 12-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S260 


FARMER L 


00029 


ACTG-0300-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S270 


WILSON H 


02269 


ACTG-0300-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0100PM 


0400PM 


BAS 


S260 


BURTON E 


00031 


ACTG-0302-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S301 


DAWKINS S 


00040 


ACTG-0401-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S308 


WOODROOF J 



usiness Law - Undergraduate 

igal environ of bus 
Commercial law 



00199 


BLAW-0340-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S316 


JOHNS H 


00203 


BLAW-0343-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S307 


rudley D 



iession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

ccounting - Undergraduate 



^IN OF ACTG I 
RIN OF ACTG II 
RIN OF ACTG II 
ANAGERIAL ACTG 
TERMEDIATE ACTG I 
DST ACCOUNTING 
DST ACCOUNTING 
:CTG SYSTEMS 
DERAL TAXES I 
TERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING 
^COUNTING THEORY 



00022 


ACTG-0211-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S330 


GRASTY W 


00026 


ACTG-02 12-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S260 


GRASTY W 


00027 


ACTG-02 12-03 


3 


MW 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S260 


HARPER B 


00032 


ACTG-0302-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S260 


REZAEE Z 


00034 


ACTG-0311-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S270 


HARRINGTON J 


00038 


ACTG-0331-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S270 


JONES H 


02277 


ACTG-0331-02 


3 


TR 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S260 


JONES H 


00045 


ACTG-0451-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S308 


WOODROOF J 


00046 


ACTG-0453-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S341 


HAMM J 


00049 


ACTG-0457-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S270 


HARRINGTON J 


00053 


ACTG-0465-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S301 


COLVARD R 



.usiness Law • Undergraduate 



EGAL ENVIRON OF BUS 
DMMERCIAL LAW 
VIFAIR TRADE PRAC 



00200 
02301 
00206 



BLAW-0340-02 3 
BLAW-0343-02 3 
BLAW-0345-01 3 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BAS S316 WOMACK L 

MTWR 0730AM 0950AM BAS S330 REYNOLDS D 

MTWR 1250PM 0310PM BAS S316 SHORT L 



accounting - Graduate 

^counting systems 
;deral taxes i 



00057 


ACTG-0551-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S308 


WOODROOF J 


00058 


ACTG-0553-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S341 


HAMM J 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W-Wadnatday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Coursaa nutnberad 0100-0499 ara undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0600 and above are open only to graduate students. 



25 



TITLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING 


00061 


ACTG-0557-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 0950AM 


BAS S270 


HARRINGTON J 


ACCOUNTING THEORY 


00064 


ACTG-0565-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 0310PM 


BAS S301 


COLVARD R 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Accounting - Undergraduate 



INTERMEDIATE ACTG 1 


00035 


ACTG-0311-02 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S270 


STAFF 


INTERMEDIATE ACTG II 


00036 


ACTG-0312-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S270 


THOMAS P B 


FEDERAL TAXES II 


00047 


ACTG-0454-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


HAMMJ 


AUDITING 1 


00050 


ACTG-0462-01 


3 


M 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


REZAEEZ 


AUDITING II 


00051 


ACTG-0463-01 


3 


R 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S330 


COLVARD R 



Business Law - Undergraduate 



LEGAL ENVIRON OF BUS 


00201 


BLAW-0340-03 


3 


M 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


8316 


REYNOLDS D 


INDEPENDENT STUDY 


00207 


BLAW-0499-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




BRANDON L 



Accounting - Graduate 

FEDERAL TAXES II 

AUDITING II 

ACTG & BUS DECISIONS 



00059 ACTG-0554-01 3 
00062 ACTG-0563-01 3 
00069 ACTG-0691-01 3 



T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


HAMMJ 


R 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S330 


COLVARD R 


W 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S274 


BUSH J 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Accounting - Undergraduate 



PRIN OF ACTG 1 


00024 


ACTG-0211-04 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S260 


STAFF 


PRIN OF ACTG II 


00028 


ACTG-02 12-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S260 


WARDT 


MANAGERIAL ACTG 


00033 


ACTG-0302-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S343 


BUSH J 


INTERMEDIATE ACTG II 


00037 


ACTG-0312-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S270 


THOMAS P B 


ADVANCED ACTG 1 


00041 


ACTG-0411-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S330 


WARDT 


FEDERAL TAXES 11 


00048 


ACTG-0454-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S341 


HAMMJ 



Business Law - Undergraduate 



LEGAL ENVIRON OF BUS 
COMMERCIAL LAW 

Accounting - Graduate 

FEDERAL TAXES II 



00202 BLAW-0340-04 3 
00205 BLAW-0343-03 3 



00060 ACTG-0554-02 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 



Accounting - Undergraduate 



PRIN OF ACTG I 



02295 ACTG-02 11 -05 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 
MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



0600PM 0830PM 



BAS S316 
BAS S316 



BRANDON L 
BRANDON L 



BAS S341 HAMM J 



BAS S316 HARPER P 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W- Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and above are open only to graduate students. 



26 



ITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Aerospace 



Dr. Ronald Ferrara, Business and Aerospace Building S21 1C, 898-2788 
NOTE: Cooperative Education and Aerospace internships offered for Pass/Fail only. 
Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00073 AERO-0293-01 

00079 AERO-0398-01 

00097 AERO-200A-01 

00100 AERO-300C-01 



00074 AERO-0294-01 

00093 AERO-06t0-01 

00098 AERO-300A-01 

00101 AERO-300D-01 



00078 AERO-0397-01 
02031 AERO-0670-01 
00099 AERO-300B-01 



session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

.erospace - Undergraduate 

ERG VEHICLE SYS 00080 AERO-0401-01 



erospace - Graduate 

ERG VEHICLE SYS 



00087 AERO-0501-01 



MTWR 0800AM 1200PM 



MTWR 0800AM 1200PM 



BAS S213 FERRARA R 



BAS S213 FERRARA R 



lession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

erospace - Undergraduate 



RGPULSIGN FUNDS 


00075 


AERO-0303-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S118 


DORRIST 


PACE 


02028 


AERO-0450-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S118 


ZLGTKY G 



erospace - Graduate 



PACE 02029 AERO-0550-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BAS S118 ZLGTKY G 

yiATIGN WORKSHOP 00093 AERG-0610-01 4 MTWR F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S128 FERRARA R 

NOTE: AERO 0610-01 is an Aerospace Workshop meeting June 7-25. Contact Aerospace Department for details. 
DV AVIATION WORKSHOP 02031 AERG-0670-01 4 MTWRF 0800AM 0500PM BAS 8128 FERRARA R 

NOTE: AERO 0670-01 is an advanced Aerospace Workshop meeting June 7-25. Contact Aerospace Department for details. 

lession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

erospace • Undergraduate 



RIVATE PILOT FLT LAB 


00097 


AERO-200A-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


ATF 


104 


CRAIG P 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00073 


AERG-0293-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




GOSSETT S 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00074 


AERO-0294-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




GOSSETT S 


ISTR FLT LAB 


00098 


AERG-300A-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


ATF 


104 


CRAIG P 


ISTR FLT LAB 


00099 


AERO-300B-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


ATF 


104 


CRAIG P 


DMM FLT LAB 


00100 


AERO-300C-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


ATF 


104 


CRAIG P 


DNVENTIONAL GEAR LAB 


00101 


AERO-300D-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




CRAIG P 


DGPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00078 


AERO-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




GOSSETT S 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00079 


AERO-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




GOSSETT S 


ERG INTERNSHIP 1 


00081 


AERO-0405-01 


3 


MW 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


ERG INTERNSHIP II 


00082 


AERO-0406-01 


3 


MW 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


MOSLEMS IN AERO 


00083 


AERO-0407-01 


1 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


ROBLEMS IN AERO 


00084 


AERO-0407-02 


2 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


ROBLEMS IN AERO 


00085 


AERO-0407-03 


3 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 



27 



TITLE 

Aerospace • Graduate 

AERO INTERNSHIP I 
PROB IN AEROSPACE 
PROB IN AEROSPACE 
PROB IN AEROSPACE 
INTRO TO AERO RES 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



00088 AERO-0505-01 3 

00089 AERO-0507-01 1 

00090 AERO-0507-02 2 

00091 AERO-0507-03 3 
00095 AERO-0661-01 3 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Aerospace - Undergraduate 

AVIA FLT SIMULATION 00076 AERO-0305-01 3 



MW 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


S208 


GOSSETT S 


TR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


BAS 


8208 


GOSSETT S 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1210PM 


BAS 


S307 


CRAIG P 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BAS S208 CROWDER D 



African-American Studies 

Dr. Bonnie Shipp, Peck Hall 346, 898-2655 
Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

00002 AAS-0460-01 00003 AAS-0499-01 

Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Interdisciplinary 

AAS INDEPENDENT STUDY 



00003 AAS-0499-01 



TBA TBA 



TBA 



SHIPP B 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Departmental 



SPECIAL PROJECTS 02200 S W-0480-01 6 MTWR 0800AM 0430PM PH 309 SHAW-McEWEN 

NOTE: S W 0480-01 topic is "Using the 'Nquzo Saba' (Principles of Blackness) in our Community: Theory and Practice." 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

interdisciplinary 



SEM IN AFRI-AM STUDIES 

Departmental 

STUDY ABROAD IN AFRICA 



00002 AAS-0460-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: AAS 0460-01 will be taught in Africa; permission required to enroll. 



00771 HIST-0399-01 6 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: HIST 0399-01 will be taught in Africa; permission required to enroll. 



BAKARI A 



BAKARI A 



Agribusiness and Agriscience 

Dr. Harley Foutch, Stark Agribusiness and Agriscience Center 100, 898-2523 

Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Agribusiness and Agriscience • Undergraduate 

MICROCOMPUTER APP AG 00006 ABAS-0410-01 3 



MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 



SAG 211 



JOHNSTON T 



28 



ITLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS TIME 

gribusiness and Agriscience • Graduate 

ICROCOMPUTER APP AG 00015 ABAS-0510-01 3 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 

ession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

gribusiness and Agriscience • Graduate 

^OB: TECH/FORESTRY & AGRI 02034 ABAS-645E-01 3 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



TBA 



TBA 



SAG 211 



HC 101 



ession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

gribusiness and Agriscience - Undergraduate 



TRO AG ENGINEERING 



TERN-AGRIBUS 
)IL SURV & LAND USE 
TERNSHIP ANIMAL SCI 
TERN-P & S SCI 



00004 ABAS-0221-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: ABAS 0221-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

00007 ABAS-0418-01 6 TBA TBA 

00011 ABAS-0435-01 3 MW 0600PM 0810PM 

00012 ABAS-0443-01 6 TBA TBA 

00013 ABAS-0468-01 6 TBA TBA 



TBA 



SAG 
SAG 
SAG 
SAG 



109 
206 
108 
100 



JOHNSTON T 



RICKETTS S 



JOHNSTON T 



RAWLINS N 
ANDERSON W 
GARRIGUS R 
FOUTCH H 



gribusiness and Agriscience - Graduate 

)IL SURV & LAND USE 00016 ABAS-0535-01 3 

ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

gribusiness and Agriscience - Graduate 

^OB: TECH/PLANT SCIENCE 00017 ABAS-645B-01 3 

«0B: TECH/AGRIBUSINESS 02033 ABAS-645D-01 3 



TBA 
TBA 



0600PM 0810PM 



TBA 
TBA 



SAG 206 



VA 
HC 



100 
101 



ANDERSON W 



RICKETTS S 
RICKETTS 8 



Art 

Mr. Carlyle Johnson, Art Barn 115, 898-2455 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00125 ART-0400-01 

00126 ART-0400-04 

00129 ART-0500-01 

00130 ART-0500-04 



02239 ART-0400-02 

02240 ART-0400-05 

02258 ART-0500-02 

02259 ART-0500-05 



00127 ART-0400-03 

00128 ART-0464-01 

00131 ART-0500-03 

00132 ART-0564-01 



ession I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

t - Undergraduate 



IT ACT/APP ELEM SCH 


00119 


ART-0221-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


ABA 


100 


CASON N 


T EDUC FOR TCHRS 


00122 


ART-0320-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1035AM 


SAG 


208 


NUELL L 


DRKSHOP 


00125 


ART-0400-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


AB 


113 


TERRY V 



NOTE: ART 0400-01 title is "Sculpture - Installation. 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W- Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered OSOO and above are open only to graduate students. 



29 



TITLE 

WORKSHOP 

WORKSHOP 
WORKSHOP 
FILM AS ART 

Art - Graduate 

WORKSHOP 
WORKSHOP 
WORKSHOP 
WORKSHOP 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



02239 



TIME 



ART-0400-02 3 MTWRF 0100PM 0500PM 

NOTE: ART 0400-02 title is "Figure Drawing." 
00127 ART-0400-03 3 MTWRF 0400PM 0800PM 

NOTE: ART 0400-03 title is "Raku." 
00126 ART-0400-04 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: ART 0400-04 students will study abroad in Italy. 
00133 ART-494G-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



00129 ART-0500-01 3 MTWRF 0800AM 1200PM 
NOTE: ART 0500-01 title is "Sculpture - Installation." 

02258 ART-0500-02 3 MTWRF 0100PM 0500PM 

NOTE: ART 0500-02 title is "Figure Drawing." 
00131 ART-0500-03 3 MTWRF 0400PM 0800PM 

NOTE: ART 0500-03 title is "Raku." 

00130 ART-0500-04 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: ART 0500-04 students will study abroad in Italy. 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Art - Undergraduate 



ADVANCED ART PROB 

Art - Graduate 

WORKSHOP 

ADV ART PROBLEMS 



LOCA 


TION 


INSTRUCTOR 


AB 


201 


STURGES N 


AB 


105 


RECCHIA M 


TBA 




JOHNSON C 


SFA 


208 


O'HARA B 



AB 


113 


TERRY V 


AB 


201 


STURGES N 


AB 


105 


RECCHIA M 


TBA 




JOHNSON C 



ORIENTATION TO ART 


00124 


ART-0390-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


SAG 


208 


ORIENTATION TO ART 


02252 


ART-0390-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




WORKSHOP 


02240 


ART-0400-05 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


SFA 


303 



NOTE: ART 0400-05 title is "Graphic Design." 
00128 ART-0464-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: ART 0464-01 students will study abroad in Italy. 



02259 ART-0500-05 3 MTWR 0800AM 1200PM SFA 303 

NOTE: ART 0500-05 title is "Graphic Design." 
00132 ART-0564-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: ART 0564-01 students will study abroad in Italy. 



Biology 

Dr. George Murphy, Davis Science Building 128, 898-2847 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 

Biology - Undergraduate 

TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 
TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 
TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 
TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 
MICROBIOLOGY 

MICROBIOLOGY 

LIFE SCI FOR ELEM TCHGS 
LIFE SCI FOR ELEM TCHGS 



28 



KALLENBERGEF 
NUELL E 
FANCHER O 

JOHNSON C 



FANCHER O 
JOHNSON C 



00153 


BIOL-01 00-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


307 


BARLOW S 


00154 


BIOL-01 00-02 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


311 


MURPHY G 


00155 


BIOL-01 00-03 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


312 


WELLS M 


00156 


BIOL-01 00-04 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


309 


BLUMK 


00164 


BIOL-0216-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


131 


DE LOS REYES 








MTWRF 


1000AM 


1220PM 


DSB 


101 




00165 


BIOL-0216-02 


4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1220PM 


DSB 


131 


ROSING W 








MTWRF 


0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


101 




00168 


BIOL-0300-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0130PM 


WPS 


313 


STAFF 


00169 


BIOL-0300-02 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0130PM 


DSB 


124 


RUTLEDGE M 



30 



FLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


M ENVIRONMNTL PROB 


00172 


BIOL-0307-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 1200PM 


DSB 130 


DOYLE P 


DTECHNOLOGY 


02035 


BIOL-0455-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 0115PM 


DSB 102 


FARONE A 


ology • Graduate 
















3TECHN0L0GY 


02036 


BIOL-0555-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 0115PM 


DSB 102 


FARONE A 



ession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

ology - Undergraduate 

iPICS IN BIOLOGY 



iPICS IN BIOLOGY 

•neral biology 

;netics 

crobiology 

•E SCI FOR ELEM TCHGS 
lATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY 

IMAN A & P I 

IMAN A & P I 

•N PHYSIOLOGY 

LNERAL ECOLOGY 

=NERAL ECOLOGY 

DME ANALYSIS 

ology • Graduate 

lOLOGY 

;OLOGY 

3ME ANALYSIS 

UN OF PHYSIOLOGY 



00158 


BIOL-01 00-05 


4 


MTWRF 


0845AM 


1025AM 


DSB 


135 


MC GHEE C 








MTWR 


1115AM 


1245PM 


WPS 


307 




00157 


BIOL-01 00-06 


4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


121 


HEMMERLY T 








MTWR 


0100PM 


0230PM 


WPS 


312 




00160 


BIOL-0111-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


WPS 


309 


MILLER B 








MTWR 


1000AM 


1200PM 


WPS 


309 




00162 


BIOL-0212-01 


4 


MTWR 


0845AM 


1155AM 


DSB 


124 


SWAIN S 








F 


0845AM 


1025AM 


DSB 


124 




00166 


BIOL-0216-03 


4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


131 


WRIGHT S 








MTWR 


0730AM 


0900AM 


DSB 


101 




00170 


BIOL-0300-03 


4 


MTWR 


0200PM 


0630PM 


COLUMBIA 


RUTLEDGE M 


00174 


BIOL-0308-01 


3 


MTWR 


0845AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


120 


BUTLER W 








MTW 


1000AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


313 




00175 


BIOL-0313-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


DSB 


130 


MILLS A 








MTWR 


0930AM 


1100AM 


WPS 


300 




00176 


BIOL-0313-02 


4 


MTWRF 


0920AM 


1100AM 


DSB 


130 


JETTON A 








MTWR 


0730AM 


0900AM 


WPS 


300 




02058 


BIOL-0411-01 


4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


120 


ERVIN M 






1 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0930AM 


DSB 


116 




00181 


BIOL-0424-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0835AM 


WPS 


310 


MULLEN D 








MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


310 




00182 


BIOL-0424-02 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


1110AM 


DSB 


137 


HOWARD R 








F 


0730AM 


0910AM 


DSB 


137 




00196 


BIOL-433E-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




KELLY J 



00186 BIOL-0524-01 4 

00187 BIOL-0524-02 4 



00197 BIOL-533E-01 3 
02059 BIOL-0633-01 4 



MTWRF 


0730AM 


0835AM 


WPS 


310 


MULLEN D 


MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


310 




MTWR 


0730AM 


1110AM 


DSB 


137 


HOWARD R 


F 


0730AM 


0910AM 


DSB 


137 




TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




KELLY J 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


120 


ERVIN M 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0930AM 


DSB 


116 





ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

ology - Undergraduate 



PICS IN BIOLOGY 
iNERAL BIOLOGY 
■NETICS 



00159 BIOL-01 00-07 4 
00161 BIOL-01 12-01 4 

00163 BIOL-0212-02 4 



MTWRF 


0730AM 


0835AM 


DSB 


131 


WELLS M 


MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


307 




MTWR 


0730AM 


0930AM 


WPS 


309 


DUBOIS J 


MTWRF 


1 000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


131 




MTWR 


0845AM 


1155AM 


DSB 


124 


MATH IS P 


F 


0845AM 


1025AM 


DSB 


124 





31 



TITLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


MICROBIOLOGY 


00167 


BIOL-0216-04 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


DSB 


121 


ZAMORA J 










MTWR 


1000AM 


1130AM 


DSB 


101 




HUMAN A & P 11 


00177 


BIOL-0314-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0845AM 


1030AM 


DSB 


130 


STEWART W 










MTWR 


1045AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


300 




HUMAN A & P II 


00178 


BIOL-0314-02 


4 


MTWRF 


0920AM 


1105AM 


DSB 


121 


STAFF 










MTWR 


0730AM 


0905AM 


WPS 


300 





Business Education^ Marketing 
Education^ and Office Management 

Dr. Linda McGrew, Business and Aerospace Building N429A, 898-2902 

NOTE: Freshman and sophomore students should not enroll in 300- or 400-level BMOM courses. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

00221 BMOM-0520-01 



00216 
00225 



BMOM-0420-01 
BMOM-0581-01 



00220 
00228 



BMOM-0481-01 
BMOM-0678-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

BMOM - Undergraduate 



BUS COMMUNICATION 


00212 


BMOM-0351-01 


3 


MTWR 


0900AM 


1210PM 


BAS 


S343 


SMITH V 


ORGANIZATIONAL COMM 


02183 


BMOM-0466-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0910PM 


BAS 


S130A 


STEWARD J 


BMOM - Graduate 




















ORGANIZATIONAL COMM 


02185 


BMOM-0566-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0910PM 


BAS 


S130A 


STEWARD J 


PROB IN BE/MEA/OE 


00228 


BMOM-0678-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




MC GREW L 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

BMOM - Undergraduate 



WORD PROCESS CONCEPT 
BUS COMMUNICATION 
BUS REPORT WRITING 

BMOM - Graduate 

BUS REPORT WRITING 
RECENT DEVEL IN OFF TECH 



00210 BMOM-0233-01 
00213 BMOM-0351-02 
00218 BMOM-0451-01 



00223 BMOM-0551-01 
00229 BMOM-0683-01 

NOTE: BMOM 0683-01 meets June 7-28 inclusive. 



3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S315 


SMITH V 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S343 


LEWIS S 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S343 


SMITH M 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S343 


SMITH M 


3 


MTWRF 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S314 


SMITH M 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

BMOM - Undergraduate 



KEYBOARDING 


00208 


OFFICE MANAGEMENT 


00211 


BUS COMMUNICATION 


00214 


PROB IN BE/ME/OM 


00216 


WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 


00220 



BMOM-0131-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

BMOM-0301-01 3 TR 0530PM 0920PM 

NOTE: BMOM 0301-01 meets June 8-July 8 inclusive. 

BMOM-0351-03 3 T 0530PM 0930PM 

BMOM-0420-01 3 TBA TBA 

BMOM-0481-01 3 TBA TBA 



BAS 


S314 


SAWYER J 


BAS 


S324 


SAWYER J 


BAS 


S343 


PRICE R 


TBA 




STAFF 


TBA 




STAFF 



32 



ITLE 


CALL NO 


. COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


(MOM - Graduate 




















'ROB IN BE/ME/OM 


00221 


BMOM-0520-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


kfORK-STUDY PROGRAM 


00225 


BMOM-0581-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


lESEARCH IN BUS/MAR ED 


00226 


BMOM-0662-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S130A 


LEWIS S 


lEAS/EVAL IN BE/ME 


00227 


BMOM-0672-01 


3 


F 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S315 


MC GREW L 










S 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S315 





NOTE: BMOM 0672-01 will meet on Fridays 4:00-8:00 p.m. on June 11, June 25, and July 16 
and on Saturdays 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on June 12, June 26, and July 17. 



iession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

iMOM - Undergraduate 



US COMMUNICATION 
ROB IN OFFICE MGMT 

;M0M - Graduate 

ROBS IN OFF MGT 



00215 
00219 



BMOM-0351-04 3 
BMOM-0464-01 3 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
TR 0530PM 0920PM 



00224 BMOM-0564-01 



TR 



0530PM 0920PM 



BAS S324 
BAS S338 



BAS S338 



FORD W 
FORDW 



Chemistry 



Dr. Earl F. Pearson, Davis Science Building 239, 898-2956 

NOTE: Cooperative Education courses offered for Pass/Fail only. 

The Area IV General Studies Requirement SC1 100 can be satisfied by taking Topics in Physical Science 100. 

Students enrolling in CHEM 01 1 1, 01 12, 0121, and 0122 must enroll in a lecture and lab section concurrently. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00242 


CHEM-0293-01 


00243 


CHEM-0294-01 


00248 


CHEM-0397-01 


00249 


CHEM-0398-01 


02060 


CHEM-0450-01 


02061 


CHEM-0450-02 


00253 


CHEM-0662-01 


02054 


CHEM-0662-03 


00256 


CHEM-0664-01 


00257 


CHEM-0664-02 


00258 


CHEM-0664-03 


00259 


CHEM-0664-04 


00260 


CHEM-0664-05 


00261 


CHEM-0664-06 


00272 


CHEM-0760-01 


02045 


CHEM-0761-01 


00273 


CHEM-0764-01 


00274 


CHEM-0764-02 


00275 


CHEM-0764-03 


00276 


CHEM-0764-04 


00277 


CHEM-0764-05 


00278 


CHEM-0764-06 


01639 


SCI-0400-01 







session I Classes: May 11-28 

hysical Science - Undergraduate 



OPICS IN PHYS SCI 
OPICS IN PHYS SCI 



NOTE: Meet time for SCI 0100 sections include lecture and lab. 

01634 SCI-01 00-01 4 MTWRF 0730AM 1220PM DSB 

01635 SCI-01 00-02 4 MTWRF 0800AM 1250PM DSB 



100 
104 



TODD A 
COOK J 



Chemistry - Undergraduate 



'JTRO GEN CHEMISTRY 00237 CHEM-0111-01 4 MTWRF 0730AM 0100PM WPS 102 WILSON L 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 0111 (lecture) section must enroll in a CHEM 111L (lab) section. 
IITRO GEN CHEMISTRY-LAB 00281 CHEM-111L-01 TBA TBA WPS 111 WILSON L 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 111L (lab) section must enroll in a CHEM 0111 (lecture) section. 



33 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session II Classes: May 31 ■ July 2 

Physical Science - Undergraduate 



NOTE: Meet time for SCI 0100 sections include lecture and lab. 



01636 


SCI-01 00-03 


4 


MTWR 


0845AM 


1220PM 


DSB 


104 


DIVINCENZO J 


01637 


SCI-01 00-04 


4 


MTWR 


0530PM 


0855PM 


DSB 


104 


DEVENDORF Q 


01639 


SCI-0400-01 


4 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


02038 


SCI-0442-01 


4 


MTWR 


1000AM 


0230PM 


WPS 


200 


PATTERSON P 



TOPICS IN PHYS SCI 
TOPICS IN PHYS SCI 
PROBLEMS IN PHYS SCI 
EXP PHYS SCI 



Chemistry - Undergraduate 

INTRO GEN CHEMISTRY 00238 CHEM-0111-02 4 MTWRF 0845AM 1220PM WPS 102 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 0111 (lecture) section must enroll in a CHEM 111L (lab) section. 
INTRO GEN CHEMISTRY-LAB 00282 CHEM-111L-02 TBA TBA WPS 111 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 111L (lab) section must enroll in a CHEM 0111 (lecture) section. 
GENERAL CHEMISTRY 00240 CHEM-0121-01 4 MTWR 1200PM 0430PM DSB 120 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 0121 (lecture) section must enroll in a CHEM 121L (lab) section. 
GEN CHEMISTRY-LAB 00284 CHEM-121L-01 TBA TBA WPS 110 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CHEM 121L (lab) section must enroll in a CHEM 121 (lecture) section. 
ELEM OF ORG CHEM 00244 CHEM-0303-01 4 MTWRF 0845AM 1220PM DSB 106 

NOTE: CHEM 0303 meet times include lecture and lab. 
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 00245 CHEM-0321-01 4 MTWRF 0730AM 1105AM DSB 100 

\Orf; CHEM 0321 meet times include lecture and lab. 
RESEARCH 02060 CHEM-0450-01 4 TBA TBA TBA 



Physical Science - Graduate 

EXP PHYS SCI 01641 

Chemistry - Graduate 



SCI-0542-01 



MTWR 1000AM 0230PM 



WPS 200 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Chemistry - Undergraduate 

NOTE: See Dr. Wayne Rollins, director, Cooperative Education, JH 155, phone 898-2225, 
for CHEM 0293, CHEM 0294, CHEM 0397, and CHEM 0398. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00242 CHEM-0293-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00243 CHEM-0294-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00248 CHEM-0397-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00249 CHEM-0398-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

Chemistry - Graduate 



CLARK G 



CLARK G 



ILSLEY W 



ILSLEY W 



KLINE P 



TODD A 



STAFF 



PATTERSON P 



TOPICS IN INORG CHEM 


00250 


CHEM-0622-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


121 


GROSS J 


TOPICS THEORY CHEM 


00269 


CHEM-0711-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


121 


GROSS J 



STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 



CHEM RESEARCH 


00253 


CHEM-0662-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00256 


CHEM-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


SXAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00257 


CHEM-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00258 


CHEM-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00259 


CHEM-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00260 


CHEM-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00261 


CHEM-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP 


00272 


CHEM-0760-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP 


02045 


CHEM-0761-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 



34 



TLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00273 


CHEM-0764-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00274 


CHEM-0764-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00275 


CHEM-0764-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00276 


CHEM-0764-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00277 


CHEM-0764-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 


SSERTATION RESEARCH 


00278 


CHEM-0764-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


STAFF 



ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

liysicai Science - Undergraduate 



)PICS IN PHYS SCI 



NOTE: Meet time for SCI 0100 sections include lecture and lab. 

02056 SCI-01 00-05 4 MTWR 0845AM 1220PM 



DSB 104 



hemistry - Undergraduate 



TROD GEN CHEMISTRY 

NOTE: 
TRO GEN CHEM-LAB 

NOTE: 
ENERAL CHEMISTRY 

NOTE: 
N CHEMISTRY-LAB 

NOTE: 
^GANIC CHEMISTRY 

»IN OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

ESEARCH 

hemistry - Graduate 

)PICS IN ANAL CHEM 

HEM RESEARCH 

<0B MOD LAB PROCED 



00239 CHEM-01 12-01 4 MTWRF 0845AM 1220PM WPS 102 

Students enrolling in a CHEM 0112 (lecture) section must enroll in a CHEM 112L (lab) section. 

00283 CHEM-112L-01 TBA TBA WPS 111 

Students enrolling in a CHEM 112L (lab) section must enroll in a CHEM 0112 (lecture) section. 

00241 CHEM-0122-01 4 MTWR 1200PM 0430PM DSB 100 

Students enrolling in a CHEM 0122 (lecture) section must enroll in a CHEM 122L (lab) section. 

00285 CHEM-122L-01 TBA TBA WPS 110 

Students enrolling in a CHEM 122L (lab) section must enroll in a CHEM 0122 (lecture) section. 

00246 CHEM-0322-01 4 MTWRF 0730AM 1105AM DSB 100 
NOTE: CHEM 0322 meet times include lecture and lab. 

00247 CHEM-0325-01 4 MTWRF 0845AM 1220PM DSB 106 
NOTE: CHEM 0325 meet times include lecture and lab. 

02061 CHEM-0450-02 4 TBA TBA TBA 



LEET 

HOWARD J 
HOWARD J 
WHITE G 
WHITE G 
STAFF 
WAKIM J 
STAFF 



00251 


CHEM-0623-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


120 


CHONG N 


02054 


CHEM-0662-03 


3 


TBA TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


02055 


CHEM-0713-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


120 


CHONG N 



Computer Information Systems 

Dr. Lee Maier, Business and Aerospace Building N333A, 898-2362 
OTE: Freshman and sophomore students should not enroll in 300- or 400-level Computer Information Systems courses. 
Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00899 


INFS-0399-01 


00901 


INFS-0442-01 


00905 


INFS-0499-01 


00911 


INFS-0698-01 


00912 


INFS-699A-01 


00914 


INFS-699B-01 



ession I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

iformation Systems - Undergraduate 



TRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 
TRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 
UN OF MIS 
)IN OF MIS 



00882 INFS-0220-01 

00883 INFS-0220-02 

00889 INFS-0310-01 

00890 INFS-0310-02 



3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S304 


HOLMES J 


3 


MTWRF 


0100PM 


0400PM 


BAS 


S304 


MAIER J 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S305 


WYATT J 


3 


MTWRF 


0100PM 


0400PM 


BAS 


S305 


HOLMES J 



35 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



Quantitative Methods - Undergraduate 



STATISTICAL METH I 
STATISTICAL METH I 
STATISTICAL METH II 
STATISTICAL METH II 



01465 QM-0261-01 

01466 QM-0261-02 

01468 Q M-0362-01 

01469 Q M-0362-02 



3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

3 MTWRF 0100PM 0400PM 

3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

3 MTWRF 0100PM 0400PM 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



BAS S339 FREEMAN G 

BAS S339 LEE J 

BAS S272 GOBER R 

BAS S272 ADAMS C 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Information Systems - Undergraduate 



INTRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 
INTRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 
COBOL APPLICATIONS 
PRIN OF MIS 
PRIN OF MIS 
PRIN OF MIS 
BUS APPL MICROCOMP 
INTRO TO SYS ANALYSIS 
INFO RESOURCE MGMT S 



Quantitative Methods - Undergraduate 

STATISTICAL METH I 
STATISTICAL METH I 
STATISTICAL METH II 
STATISTICAL METH II 
STATISTICAL METH II 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Information Systems • Undergraduate 



00884 


INFS-0220-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S304 


GAMBILL S 


00885 


INFS-0220-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S304 


CLARK W 


00888 


INFS-0272-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S272 


GAMBILL S 


00891 


INFS-0310-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S305 


HOLMES J 


00892 


INFS-0310-04 


3 


TR 


1250PM 


0510PM 


BAS 


S339 


CLARK C 


00893 


INFS-0310-05 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S305 


WYATT J 


00897 


INFS-0320-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


CLARK W 


02217 


INFS-0370-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


CLARK C 


00903 


INFS-0474-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S305 


WYATT J 



02218 


Q M-0261-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S275 


FARRAR P 


01467 


Q M-0261-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S275 


LEE J 


01470 


Q M-0362-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S272 


FREEMAN G 


01471 


Q M-0362-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S278 


ADAMS C 


01472 


M-0362-05 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S275 


LEE J 



INDEPEND STUDY IN IS 


00899 


INFS-0399-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


INF SYSTEMS INTERN 


00901 


INFS-0442-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


IND STUDY IN INF SYS 


00905 


INFS-0499-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



Information Systems - Graduate 



IND RES IN INF SYS 


00912 


INFS-699A-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


IND RES IN INF SYS 


00914 


INFS-699B-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



BAS N333C MAIER J 
BAS N333C MAIER J 
BAS N333C MAIER J 



BAS N333C MAIER J 
BAS N333C MAIER J 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Information Systems - Undergraduate 



INTRO TO COMPUTERS 


02220 


INFS-01 00-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S137E 


STAFF 


INTRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 


00886 


INFS-0220-05 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S304 


HUGHES C 


INTRO TO MICROCOMPUTING 


00887 


INFS-0220-06 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S304 


JONES C 


PRIN OF MIS 


00894 


INFS-0310-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S305 


AGGARWAL R 


PRIN OF MIS 


00895 


INFS-0310-07 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S305 


AGGARWAL R 


PRIN OF MIS - 


00896 


INFS-0310-08 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S305 


JONES C 


DEC SUPPORT SYS 


00898 


INFS-0350-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S305 


AGGARWAL R 


NEW TECH IN INFO SYS 


00902 


INFS-0450-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S339 


HUGHES C 


ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 


00904 


INFS-0476-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


MAIER J 



36 



riTLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

Quantitative Methods - Undergraduate 



TIME 



STATISTICAL METH I 
STATISTICAL METH II 
STATISTICAL METH II 



02219 Q M-0261-05 

01473 QM-0362-06 

01474 QM-0362-07 



3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 

3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



BAS S272 EFF A 
BAS S272 GOBER R 
BAS S272 GOBER R 



Information Systems - Graduate 



\DVANCED PROGRAMMING 


00907 


INFS-0576-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


MAIER J 


3EM IN GLOBAL INFS 


00910 


INFS-0675-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


HUGHES C 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

Quantitative Methods • Undergraduate 

DECISION SCI TECH 

Information Systems - Graduate 



NFS MGMT & APPL 
NFORMATION SYSTEMS PRACT 



Quantitative Methods - Graduate 

3UAN METH SURVEY 



01475 


Q M-0401-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


ate 

00908 


INFS-0661-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0840PM 


00911 


INFS-0698-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


uate 

01476 


Q M-0600-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 



BAS S272 FREEMAN G 



BAS S305 GAMBILL S 
BAS S278 CLARK W 



BAS S275 ADAMS C 



Computer Science 



Dr. Richard Detmer, Kirksey Old Main 306, 898-2397 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

00331 CSCI-0397-01 



00328 
00332 



CSCI-0293-01 
CSCI-0398-01 



00329 
00336 



CSCI-0294-01 
CSCI-0491-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Computer Science - Undergraduate 



;OMPUTER LITERACY 
;OMPUTER LITERACY 
iOMPUTER LITERACY 
;OMPUTER LITERACY 
;SCI ORIENT 



00314 CSCI-0100-01 1 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 
NOTE: CSCI 0100-01 meets May 11-17 inclusive. 

00315 CSCI-01 00-02 1 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 
NOTC: CSCI 0100-02 meets May ia-24 inclusive. 

00316 CSCI-0100-03 1 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 
NOTE: CSCI 0100-03 meets May 24-28 inclusive. 

00317 CSCI-01 00-04 1 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 
NOTE: CSCI 0100-04 meets May 11-17 inclusive. 

00323 CSCI-0115-01 3 MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Computer Science • Undergraduate 



COMPUTER LITERACY 



COMPUTER LITERACY 



COMPUTER LITERACY 



00318 CSCI-01 00-05 1 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: CSCI 0100-05 meets June 1-9 inclusive. 

00319 CSCI-01 00-06 1 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 
NOTE: CSCI 0100-06 meets June 10-21 inclusive. 

00320 CSCI-01 00-07 1 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 
NOTE: CSCI 0100-07 meets June 22-30 inclusive. 



KOM 307 



KOM 307 



KOM 307 



KOM 321 



KOM 323 



KOM 323 



KOM 321 



KOM 321 



YOO J 



YOO J 



YOO J 



CRIPPS A 



PARKER B 



PARKER 8 



CHEATHAM T 



CHEATHAM T 



37 



TITLE 

COMPUTER LITERACY 

CSCI ORIENT 

INTRO ASSEMBLY LANG 

SELECTED TOPICS IN CSCI 



CALL NO. COURSE 10 

00321 



HRS DAYS 



TIME 



00324 
00330 
02190 



Computer Science - Graduate 

SELECTED TOPICS IN CSCI 021 91 



CSCI-01 00-08 1 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: CSCI 0100-00 meets June 1-9 inclusive. 
CSCI-0115-02 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

CSCI-0316-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

CSCI-0490-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: CSCI 0490-01 topic is "Windows NT." 



CSCI-0590-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: CSCI 0590-01 topic is "Windows NT." 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Computer Science - Undergraduate 



COMPUTER SCIENCE I 



COMPUTER SCIENCE II 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COMP SCI INTERNSHIP 



00326 CSCI-01 17-01 4 MTWR 1010AM 1120AM 

TR 0840AM 1010AM 

NOTE: CSCI 0117-01 meets May 31-Jufy 29 inclusive. 

00327 CSCI-0217-01 4 MTWR 1125AM 1235PM 

MW 1235PM 0205PM 

NOTE: CSCI 0217-01 meets May 31-July 29 inclusive. 



00328 
00329 
00331 
00332 
00336 



CSCI-0293-01 
CSCI-0294-01 
CSCI-0397-01 
CSCI-0398-01 
CSCI-0491-01 



TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Computer Science - Undergraduate 



COMPUTER LITERACY 



CSCI ORIENT 



00322 CSCI-01 00-09 1 MTWR 0730 AM 0950AM 

NOTE: CSCI 0100-09 meets July 6-15 inclusive. 

00325 CSCI-01 15-03 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



Computer Science - Graduate 

SELECTED TOPICS IN CS 00340 CSCI-0660-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: CSCI 0660-01 topic is "Agent Programming." 



Cooperative Education 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

KOM 321 CHEATHAM T 

KOM 321 CHEATHAM T 

KOM 307 DETMER R 

KOM 323 YOOS J 



KOM 323 



KOM 307 
KOM 350 



KOM 307 
KOM 350 

TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



KOM 307 
KOM 321 



KOM 321 



YOOS 



THWEATT J 



UNTCH R 



THWEATT J 
THWEATT J 
THWEATT J 
THWEATT J 
THWEATT J 



THWEATT J 
HANKINS J 



WRAYR 



Dr. Wayne Rollins, Jones Hall 155, 898-2225 

NOTE: Cooperative Education courses (except Computer Science) offered for Pass/Fail only. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in any Cooperative Education class(es). 

Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Interdisciplinary 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00310 COED-0293-01 3 TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00311 COED-0294-01 3 TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00312 COED-0397-01 3 TBA TBA 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00313 COED-0398-01 3 TBA TBA 



JH 


155 


ROLLINS M 


JH 


155 


ROLLINS M 


JH 


155 


ROLLINS M 


JH 


155 


ROLLINS M 



38 



riTLE 

departmental 
Aerospace 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



00073 AERO-0293-01 3 TBA 

00074 AERO-0294-01 3 TBA 

00078 AERO-0397-01 3 TBA 

00079 AERO-0398-01 3 TBA 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



TBA 


GOSSETT S 


TBA 


GOSSETT S 


TBA 


GOSSETT S 


TBA 


GOSSETT S 



"hemistry 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



00242 CHEM-0293-01 3 TBA TBA 

00243 CHEM-0294-01 3 TBA TBA 

00248 CHEM-0397-01 3 TBA TBA 

00249 CHEM-0398-01 3 TBA TBA 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



ilomputer Science 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



00328 CSCI-0293-01 3 

00329 CSCI-0294-01 3 

00331 CSCI-0397-01 3 

00332 CSCI-0398-01 3 



TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


THWEATT J 


TBA 


THWEATT J 


TBA 


THWEATT J 


TBA 


THWEATT J 



iconomics and Finance 

lOOPERATlVE EDUCATION 
;OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
;OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
lOOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



00374 ECON-0397-01 3 

00375 ECON-0398-01 3 

00623 FIN-0397-01 3 

00624 FIN-0398-01 3 



TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


KITTRELL F 


TBA 


KITTRELL F 


TBA 


KITTRELL F 


TBA 


KITTRELL F 



ingineering Technology and Industrial Studies 

;OOPEDUCEXPI 00577 ETIS-0293-01 3 

;00P EDUC EXP II 00578 ETIS-0294-01 3 

;OOP EDUC EXP III 00583 ETIS-0397-01 3 

;OOP EDUC EXP IV 00584 ETIS-0398-01 3 



TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



Human Sciences 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



00872 


IDES-0293-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00873 


IDES-0294-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00876 


IDES-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00877 


IDES-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01967 


TXMD-0293-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01968 


TXMD-0294-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01969 


TXMD-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01970 


TXMD-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


KELLEY N 



Vtanagement and Marketing 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
JOOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



01050 MGMT-0397-01 3 

01051 MGMT-0398-01 3 

01083 MKT-0397-01 3 

01084 MKT-0398-01 3 



TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 



BAS N116 

BAS N116 

BAS N114 

BAS Nil 6 



PETERS M 
PETERS M 
MOSER H 
MOSER H 



39 



TITLE 

Mathematical Sciences 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

02270 MATH-0293-01 3 TBA TBA 
02273 MATH-0294-01 3 TBA TBA 

02271 MATH-0397-01 3 TBA TBA 

02272 MATH-0398-01 3 TBA TBA 



TIME LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

KOM 203D BALCH J 

KOM 203D BALCH J 

KOM 203D BALCH J 

KOM 203D BALCH J 



Criminal Justice Administration 

Dr. Frank Lee, 1421 E. Main, 898-2630 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00289 CJA-0290-01 
00300 CJA-0590-01 
00304 CJA-0664-03 



00294 
00301 



CJA-0430-01 
CJA-0625-01 



00296 
00302 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Criminal Justice Administration - Undergraduate 



COM BASE TREAT OFFEN 
SPEC ISSUE-LAW ENFOR 



00290 CJA-0363-01 
02160 CJA-0426-01 



Criminal Justice Administration - Graduate 

SPEC ISSUE-LAW ENFOR 02161 CJA-0526-01 

Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Criminal Justice Administration - Undergraduate 



PREV & CONTROL CRIME 
COMM REL & MIN PROBS 



00288 CJA-0220-01 
02162 CJA-0422-01 



Criminal Justice Administration - Graduate 

COMM REL & MIN PROBS 02163 CJA-0522-01 3 

Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Criminal Justice Administration - Undergraduate 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 
MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 
MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



INTRO TO CJA 



PRACT IN LAW ENFORCE 
WOMEN, CRIME & JUST ADM 



COMM REL & MIN PROBS 



LAW ENFOR INTERNSHIP 
JUVENILE JUSTICE SYS 



READINGS IN CJA 



00287 CJA-01 10-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: CJA 0110-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
00289 CJA-0290-01 6 TBA TBA 

02418 CJA-0370-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: CJA 0370-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
00292 CJA-0422-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: CJA 0422-02 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
00294 CJA-0430-01 9 TBA TBA 

02419 CJA-0450-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: CJA 0450-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
00296 CJA-0490-01 3 TBA TBA 



CJA-0490-01 
CJA-0664-01 



PH 312 ROGERS R 

PH 103B SELVAL 



PH 103B SELVA L 



PH 312 HALLETTM 

PH 103B POWELL D 



PH 103B POWELL D 



TBA 




BERRETTA B 


VH 


006 


LEEF 


TBA 




BERRETTA B 


TBA 




BERRETTA B 


VH 


006 


LEEF 


TBA 




BERRETTA B 



VH 006 



LEEF 



40 



ITLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 




TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRL 


Iriminal Justice Admin 


istration - Graduate 














EADINGS IN CJA 


00300 


CJA-0590-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




VH 006 


LEEF 


RIM JUST INTERNSHIP 


00301 


CJA-0625-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


LEEF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00302 


CJA-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




VH 006 


LEEF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00304 


CJA-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


LEEF 



session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Criminal Justice Administration - Undergraduate 

;riminal investigatn 00295 cjA-0433-01 3 

Criminal Justice Administration - Graduate 

;riminal investigatn 00299 cjA-0533-01 3 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



Developmental Studies 

Dr. Carol Bader, Peck Hall 217, 898-2568 

NOTE: All students who took the AAPP test (or any portion of it) and who were placed into courses in the 

Developmental Studies program must enroll in and complete the designated courses in sequence. 

Failure to enroll in designated courses will result in the student's immediate withdrawal from the University. 

Developmental courses cannot be used for graduation. 

Tennessee Board of Regents policy prohibits students from withdrawing from courses in the 

Developmental Studies program. Under extenuating circumstances a course may be dropped with the 

approval of the director of Developmental Studies. 

I// Developmental Studies courses will meet Monday through Friday, May 31 -July 22. Final exams will be given July 23. 

session 111 Classes: May 31 - August 7 

developmental Studies English 



EVELOP'L WRITING 



EVELOP'L WRITING 



00351 DSE-0080-01 3 MTWRF 0850AM 0955AM PH 306 HUNT C 
NOTE: DSE 0080-01 will meet with RSE 0070-01. 

00352 DSE-0080-02 3 MTWRF 1010AM 1115AM PH 306 HUNT C 



developmental Studies Math 

LEMEN ALGEBRA 
EMEN ALGEBRA 
ITERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 
ITERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 
ITERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 
TERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 



evelopmental Studies Reading 

iVELOP'L READING 



00353 


DSM-0080-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


0955AM 


KOM 


120 


ANTON H 


00354 


DSM-0080-02 


3 


MTWRF 


1010AM 


1115AM 


KOM 


120 


DOOLEY J 


00355 


DSM-0085-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0835AM 


KOM 


159 


ALLEY V 


00356 


DSM-0085-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


0955AM 


KOM 


159 


DAWSON C 


00357 


DSM-0085-03 


3 


MTWRF 


1010AM 


1115AM 


KOM 


159 


WILLIAMS A 


00358 


DSM-0085-04 


3 


MTWRF 


1130AM 


1235PM 


KOM 


159 


OTTSD 


Jing 


















00359 


DSR-0080-01 


3 


MTWRF 


1130AM 


0105PM 


KOM 


124 


BADER C 



NOTE: DSR 0080-01 will meet with RSR 0070-01. 



evelopmental Study Skills 



EV STUDY SKILLS 



00360 DSS-0080-01 



MTWRF 0730AM 0835AM 



KOM 161 



OTTOS 



41 



TITLE 

Basic English 

BASIC WRITING 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



01614 RSE-0070-01 3 MTWRF 0850AM 0955AM PH 306 HUNT C 

NOTE: RSE 0070-01 will meet with DSE 0080-01. 
NOTE: Students registering for RSE-0070 must sign up for two hours of lab each week to be arranged. 



Basic Math 

BASIC MATHEMATICS 

Basic Reading 

BASIC READING 



01615 RSM-0070-01 



MTWRF 1010AM 1115AM PH 314B ANTON H 



01616 RSR-0070-01 3 MTWRF 1130AM 0105PM KOM 124 BADER C 

NOTE: RSR 0070-01 will meet with DSR 0080-01. 



Distance Learning Classes 

NOTE: A comprehensive listing of Distance Learning courses can be found beginning on pagfi 97. 



Economics and Finance 

Dr. John T. Lee, Business and Aerospace Building N329C, 898-2520 

NOTE: Freshman and sophomore students should not enroll in 300- or 400-level Economics and Finance courses. 

Cooperative Education courses offered for Pass/Fail only. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following classics): 



00374 


ECON-0397-01 


00375 


ECON-0398-01 


02278 


ECON-0499-01 


00381 


ECON-0499-02 


02282 


ECON-0599-01 


00387 


ECON-0599-02 


00393 


ECON-0644-01 


02288 


ECON-712A-01 


00623 


FIN-0397-01 


00624 


FIN-0398-01 


02279 


FIN-0499-01 


00632 


FIN-0499-02 


00633 


FIN-0499-03 


02281 


FIN-0599-01 


00638 


FIN-0599-02 


00639 


FIN-0599-03 


00640 


FIN-0644-01 







Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Economics - Undergraduate 



PRIN OF ECONOMICS 
PRIN OF ECONOMICS 
FIN SYSTEM & ECONOMY 

Finance - Undergraduate 

BUS FIN 
INVESTMENTS 
INSURANCE CO OPER 

Finance - Graduate 

INSURANCE CO OPER 



00361 ECON-0241-01 
00365 ECON-0242-01 
00369 ECON-0321-01 



00615 FIN-0301-01 
00620 FIN-0381-01 
00628 FIN-0473-01 



00635 FIN-0573-01 



3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S336 


ZIETZJ 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S334 


FAYISSA B 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


SI 28 


FORDW 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S328 


KITTRELL F 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S279 


FELLER J 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S274 


HOLLMAN K 


3 


MTWRF 


0850AM 


1150AM 


BAS 


S274 


HOLLMAN K 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Economics - Undergraduate 



PRIN OF ECONOMICS 
PRIN OF ECONOMICS 
FIN SYSTEM & ECONOMY 



00362 


ECON-0241-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S279 


CORCORAN B 


00366 


ECON-0242-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S279 


EVANS B 


00370 


ECON-0321-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S336 


OEMEM 



42 



riTLE 

>ROB IN GOV FINANCE 
'ROB IN ECONOMICS 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



E 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


1230PM 


BAS S336 


CORCORAN B 




TBA 


KAWAHITO K 



00376 ECON-0431-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 

02278 ECON-0499-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: ECON 0499-01 topic is "Japanese Culture and Economy." 
This is an international field study which will involve a trip to Japan. The course requires approval of instructor. 



-inance - Undergraduate 

'ER FIN PLANNING 

'RIN FIN MGMT 
lUS FIN 

MANAGERIAL FINANCE 
'ROB IN GOV FINANCE 
'ORT THEORY & MGT 
'ROBLEMS IN FINANCE 



00614 


FIN-0201-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S334 


LEE J 




NOTE: FIN 0201-01 meets May 31- 


fu/y 1 inclusive. 








02285 


FIN-0300-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S337 


STAFF 


00616 


FIN-0301-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S328 


STAFF 


00625 


FIN-0411-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S334 


KITTRELL F 


00627 


FIN-0431-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S336 


CORCORAN B 


00629 


FIN-0481-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S274 


HOMAIFAR G 


02279 


FIN-0499-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




KAWAHITO K 



NOTE: FIN 0499-01 topic is "Japanese Culture and Economy." 



This is an international field study which will involve a trip to Japan. The course requires approval of instructor. 



Economics - Graduate 

ROB IN GOV FINANCE 
ROB IN ECON 



00382 ECON-0531-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BAS 

02282 ECON-0599-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: ECON 0599-01 topic is "Japanese Culture and Economy." 



S336 



CORCORAN B 
KAWAHITO K 



This is an international field study which will involve a trip to Japan. The course requires approval of instructor. 



inance • Graduate 



ROB IN GOV FINANCE 
ROBLEMS IN FINANCE 



1230PM 



BAS 
TBA 



S336 



00634 FIN-0531-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 

02281 FIN-0599-01 3 TBA TBA 

\Orf; FIN 0599-01 topic is "Japanese Culture and Economy" 
This is an international field study which will invohfe a trip to Japan. The course requires approval of instructor. 



CORCORAN B 
KAWAHITO K 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

conomics • Undergraduate 



RlN OF ECONOMICS 


00363 


ECON-0241-03 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S334 


STAFF 


RIN OF ECONOMICS 


00367 


ECON-0242-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S336 


STAFF 


N SYSTEM & ECONOMY 


00371 


ECON-0321-03 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S279 


GRADDY D 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00374 


ECON-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




KITTRELL F 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00375 


ECON-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




KITTRELL F 


ROB IN ECONOMICS 


00381 


ECON-0499-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 



NOTE: ECON 0499-02 is an independent study course which requires permission of the instructor. 



inance - Undergraduate 



us FIN 


00617 


FIN-0301-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 0810PM BAS S334 


STAFF 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00623 


FIN-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA TBA 


KITTRELL F 


OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 


00624 


FIN-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA TBA 


KITTRELL F 


ROBLEMS IN FINANCE 


00632 


FIN-0499-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA BAS S274 


TIMMONS J 


/voir: 


FIN 0499-02 is an independent study 


course which 


requires permission of the instructor. 




ROBLEMS IN FINANCE 


00633 


FIN-0499-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA TBA 


STAFF 



NOTE: FIN 0499-03 is an independent study course which requires permission of the instructor. 



43 



TITLE 

Economics - Graduate 

PROS IN ECON 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



STAFF 



00387 ECON-0599-02 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: ECON 0599-02 is an independent study course which requires permission of the instructor. 

READINGS ECON 00393 ECON-0644-01 3 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 

TOPICS/ADV MICROECON 02288 ECON-712A-01 3 T TBA BAS S274 EFF E 



Finance - Graduate 



PROBLEMS IN FINANCE 



00638 FIN-0599-02 



BAS S274 TIMMONS J 



NOTE: FIN 0599-02 is an independent study course which requires permission of the instructor. 



PROBLEMS IN FINANCE 



00639 FIN-0599-03 



READINGS IN FIN 



NOTE: FIN 0599-03 is an independent study course which requires permission of the instructor. 

00640 FIN-0644-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Economics - Undergraduate 



STAFF 



PRIN OF ECONOMICS 


00364 


ECON-0241-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S336 


KAWAHITO K 


PRIN OF ECONOMICS 


00368 


ECON-0242-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S274 


STAFF 


FIN SYSTEM & ECONOMY 


00372 


ECON-0321-04 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S334 


DEPRINCE A 


COMPUTER APPL IN E&F 


00373 


ECON-0391-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S302 


NGUYEN N 



Finance - Undergraduate 

BUS FIN 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
COMPUTER APPL IN E&F 
MANAGERIAL FINANCE 



00618 FIN-0301-04 

00619 FIN-0361-01 
00622 FIN-0391-01 
00626 FIN-0411-02 



3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S279 


ZIETZ E 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S337 


HOLLMAN K 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S302 


NGUYEN N 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S334 


MICHELLO F 



Economics - Graduate 

SEMINAR ON FIN MKTS 



00394 ECON-0646-01 



0600PM 1020PM 



BAS S279 DEPRINCE A 



Finance - Graduate 

SEMINAR ON FIN MKTS 



00641 FIN-0646-01 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 



MW 



0600PM 1020PM 



BAS S279 DEPRINCE A 



Economics - Graduate 

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 00388 ECON-0600-01 3 MW 0600PM 0830PM BAS S279 FAYISSA B 

NOTE: ECON 0643 sections 1 and 2 are Distance Learning courses taught through Video Data Conference. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 00389 ECON-0643-01 3 TR 0600PM 0830PM KOM 126 GRADDY D 

SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 02308 ECON-0643-02 3 TR 0600PM 0830PM FRANKLIN GRADDY D 



Finance • Graduate 

INT'L FIN MGMT 



02406 FIN-0686-01 



0600PM 0830PM 



STAFF 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W- Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and above are open only to graduate students. 



44 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



Educational Leadership 

Dr. Nancy Keese, Jones Hall 323, 898-2855 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



02428 FOED-761B-01 



01814 SPSE-0643-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Foundations of Education - Undergraduate 



02005 YOED-0610-01 



EDUCATION AS PROFESSION 
'SY HUM DEV & LEARN 



00644 


FOED-0111-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


KOM 


158 


BULLEN R 


00647 


FOED-0211-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


LRC 


241 


HAYES J 



.ibrary Science - Undergraduate 

JKS & MEDIA FOR CHLD 00932 LS-0415-01 3 MTWR 0800AM 1200PM 



LIB 001 



CRAIG D 



School Personnel Service Education • Undergraduate 



ECHNOLOGY IN TEACHING 



01801 SPSE-0322-01 



MTWR 0800AM 1200PM 



SANDERS J 



fouth Education - Undergraduate 



^GN CLSRM INSTRUCTION 



02001 YOED-0400-01 



MTWR 0800AM 1200PM 



KOM 160 



YOUNG B 



oundations of Education - Graduate 

CHL COMUTY RELTNS 
kNA & APP OF ED RESEARCH 

DUC TESTS & MEASURE 
)IR IND ED RES 



00653 


FOED-0603-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


00657 


FOED-0661-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


00659 


FOED-0663-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


02428 


FOED-761B-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 





KOM 160 

LIB 003 

LRC 241 
TBA 



PEYTON M 
GRIMES P 
KEESE N 
KEESE N 



ibrary Science - Graduate 



IKS & MEDIA FOR CHLD 
REP/USE INST MATRLS 



00934 
00941 



LS-0515-01 
L S-0696-01 



MTWR 0800AM 
MTWR 0430PM 



1200PM 
0830PM 



LIB 
LIB 



001 
001 



CRAIG D 
STAFF 



ichool Personnel Service Education • Graduate 

■.UPERV OF INSTR 
STUDIES IN LEADERSHP 
'REP/USE INST MATRLS 
ITUDIES IN LEADERSHI 

session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

oundations of Education - Undergraduate 

DUCATION AS PROFESSION 
■SY HUM DEV & LEARN 

.ibrary Science • Undergraduate 



01805 


SPSE-0604-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


158 


HUFFMAN J 


01808 


SPSE-0608-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


162 


EAKER R 


01870 


SPSE-0696-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LIB 


001 


STAFF 


01875 


SPSE-0708-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


162 


EAKER R 



00645 


FOED-0111-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


158 


BULLEN R 


00648 


FOED-0211-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


162 


LANGSTER J 



IKS & MEDIA FOR CHLD 



00933 LS-04 15-02 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



LIB 001 HAYES J 



chool Personnel Service Education - Undergraduate 

ECHNOLOGY IN TEACHING 01802 SPSE-0322-02 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



LRC 101B PEYTON M 



45 



TITLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS TIME 

Youth Education - Undergraduate 

ANALYSIS OF EFFECT TEACH 01999 YOED-0305-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

Foundations of Education - Graduate 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



KOM 162 



LANGSTER J 



EDUC FOUNDATIONS 


00650 


FOED-0602-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


158 


WOMACK B 


ANA & APP OF ED RESEARCH 


00658 


FOED-0661-02 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


LRC 


241 


GRIMES P 


SEMINAR IN ED FOUND 


00660 


FOED-0706-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


162 


STAFF 


PROB OF EVAL HI ED 


00663 


FOED-0752-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


LIB 


001 


WOMACK B 


SEM IN COLLEGE TEACH 


00664 


FOED-0756-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


LRC 


241 


HAYES J 



Library Science - Graduate 

BKS & MEDIA FOR CHLD 00935 L S-0515-02 

School Personnel Service Education ■ Graduate 



ORGN/ADM PUB SCHLS 
INSTRUCT LEADERSHIP 
TEACH LDR FOR SCH IMP 
SCHOOL FINANCE 
SECONDARY SCH ADMIN 
INTRO CURRIC DEVELOP 



01803 
01807 
01809 
01811 
02297 
01814 



SPSE-0601-01 
SPSE-0605-01 
SPSE-0614-01 
SPSE-0634-01 
SPSE-0638-01 
SPSE-0643-01 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM LIB 001 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 



0730AM 
1010AM 
0730AM 
1250PM 
1010AM 



MTWRF 0800AM 



0950AM 
1230PM 
0950AM 
0310PM 
1230PM 
0500PM 



KOM 158 

LIB 001 

LRC 241 

KOM 160 

LIB 003 

BAS S128 



HAYES J 



BULLEN R 
HUFFMAN J 
WEEKS T 
EMBRY D 
GRIMES P 
MOSELEY A 



NOTE: SPSE 0643-01 is an Aerospace Workshop meeting June 7-25. Contact Aerospace Department for deUils. 

INTRO CURRIC DEVELOP 01815 SPSE-0643-02 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM KOM 160 MOSELEY A 

ELEM/MID-SCHL CURRIC 02289 SPSE-0645-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM KOM 160 WEEKS T 

STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02390 SPSE-0652-04 1 R 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 STAFF 

F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-04 is a workshop meeting June 3-4. Tide is "Books and Related Activities for Pre-School and Primary Grades. " 
STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02391 SPSE-0652-05 1 R 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 STAFF 

F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-05 is a workshop meeting June 10-11. Title is "Building Attitudes Toward Self and Learning.' 



STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 



02392 SPSE-0652-06 1 



R 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-06 is a workshop meeting June 17-18. Title is "Storytelling. 



ADM OF HIGHER ED 01842 SPSE-0653-01 

MICROCOMP IN ED ADM 01864 SPSE-0660-01 

JUNIOR-COMMUNITY COL 02420 SPSE-0710-01 

ADM OF HIGHER ED 01902 SPSE-0753-01 

Youth Education - Graduate 

AVIATION WORKSHOP 02005 YOED-0610-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 



0430PM 
1250PM 
0430PM 
0430PM 



0650PM 
0310PM 
0650PM 
0650PM 



KOM 160 

LRC 101B 

KOM 158 

KOM 160 



STAFF 



EMBRY D 
PEYTON M 
STAFF 
EMBRY D 



MTWRF 0800AM 0500PM BAS SI 28 FERRARA R 



NOTE: YOED 0610-01 is an Aerospace Workshop meeting June 7-25. Contact Aerospace Department for details. 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Foundations of Education - Undergraduate 



EDUCATION AS PROFESSION 


00646 


FOED-0111-03 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


158 


STAFF 


PSY HUM DEV & LEARN 


00649 


FOED-0211-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


LRC 


241 


SANDERS J 



Youth Education • Undergraduate 



METH STRAT FOR TCHNG 
MGN CLSRM INSTRUCTION 



02000 
02302 



YOED-0310-01 
YOED-0400-02 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 



LRC 241 
KOM 160 



CRAIG D 
YOUNG B 



46 



TITLE 


CALL NO. COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


Foundations of Education 


■ Graduate 












EDUC FOUNDATIONS 


00651 FOED-0602-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 0310PM 


LIB 001 


WILLIAMS J 


CONTR OF PSY TO ED 


00661 FOED-0708-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 1230PM 


KOM 160 


YOUNG B 



Library Science - Graduate 

CLASS & CATL MED/MAT 
PRINCIPLES LIBRARIANSHIP 



00936 


LS-0612-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


LIB 


001 


STAFF 


00937 


LS-0613-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


LIB 


001 


STAFF 



School Personnel Service Education - Graduate 



3RGN/ADM PUB SCHLS 


01804 


SPSE-0601-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


160 


EAKER R 


SUPERV OF INSTR 


01806 


SPSE-0604-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


163 


HUFFMAN J 


ELEM/MID SCHL PRNCPL 


02300 


SPSE-0633-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


LIB 


003 


STAFF 


5CHOOL LAW 


01813 


SPSE-0639-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


LIB 


003 


EMBRY D 


NTRO CURRIC DEVELOP 


01816 


SPSE-0643-03 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


162 


MOSELEY A 


STUDIES IN EDUC ADM 


02395 


SPSE-0650-07 


1 


F 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S338 


STAFF 










8 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S338 





NOTE: SPSE 0650-07 is a workshop meeting July 9-10. Title is "Current Legal Issues for Teachers." 
STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02396 SPSE-0652-10 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-10 is a workshop meeting July 16-17. Title is "Search Skill Development and Using the Net for 

STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02397 SPSE-0652-11 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-11 is a workshop meeting August 6-7. Title is "Creative Thinking Skills." 
i«ICROCOMP K-12 SETNG 01866 SPSE-0664-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM LRC 101B 

•D RES METHODOLOGY 01874 SPSE-0701-01 3 MTWR 0430PM 0650PM LRC 241 

;URR STRUCT & FUNCT 02294 SPSE-0713-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM KOM 162 

)VERVIEW HIGHER ED 01903 SPSE-0754-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM KOM 158 

NST DEV IN HIGH EDU 01904 SPSE-0755-01 3 MTWR 0430PM 0650PM KOM 160 



STAFF 



Instruction. 

STAFF 



SANDERS J 
CRAIG D 
EAKER R 
WOMACK B 
WILLIAMS J 



Elementary and Special Education 

Dr. Race Bergman, Jones Hall 223, 898-2680 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00419 


ELED-0431-01 


00421 


ELED-0431-02 


00420 


ELED-0431-03 


00422 


ELED-0431-04 


00426 


ELED-0531-01 


02368 


ELED-0531-02 


00427 


ELED-0531-03 


02380 


ELED-0531-04 


00461 


ELED-626R-01 


01507 


READ-0675-01 


01714 


SPED-0680-01 


01720 


SPED-0695-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Elementary Education - Undergraduate 

■DUC TECH IN THE ELEM SCHOOL 02367 

«ETH & MAT EL L ARTS 02365 

dETH & MAT EL L ARTS 02366 

dETH MAT EL SCH MATH 00441 

■LEM CURR (K-4) 02378 

C1NDERGARTEN PRACT 00419 

KINDERGARTEN PRACT 00421 



ELED-0225-01 


2 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1030AM 


LRC 


101A 


MEANS H 


ELED-311A-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


KOM 


123 


CREWS N 


ELED-311A-02 


3 


MTWR 


0900AM 


0100PM 


COLUMBIA 


GOWER D 


ELED-311D-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


KOM 


104 


BERGMAN R 


ELED-0325-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


LIB 


003 


BERTRAND N 


ELED-0431-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


PCS 


TBA 


BABBH 


ELED-0431-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


TBA 


TBA 


RINGT 



47 



TITLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

Special Education - Undergraduate 



TIME 



SURVEY OF EXC CHILD 
SURVEY OF EXC CHILD 



01694 
01695 



SPED-0301-01 
SPED-0301-02 



MTWR 0800AM 
MTWR 1230PM 



Elementary Education - Graduate 



1200PM 
0430PM 



KINDERGARTEN PRACT 


00426 


ELED-0531-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


KINDERGARTEN PRACT 


02368 


ELED-0531-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


TEACHING WRITING 


00428 


ELED-0600-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


SEM INNOV TRENDS EL 


00434 


ELED-0621-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


SEM EARLY CHILDHOOD 


02379 


ELED-0622-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



KOM 163 CALDERJ 

KOM 160 WALDROP P 



PCS TBA BABB H 

TBA TBA RING T 

KOM 105 SOLLEY B 

PH 312 JONES C 

JH 138 GLASCOTT K 



Reading - Graduate 

READ EARLY CHLDHD ED 



01508 READ-0676-01 



Special Education - Graduate 

OVERVIEW SPEC ED 01699 SPED-0602-01 3 

Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Elementary Education - Undergraduate 



MTWR 0430PM 0830PM 



MTWR 0430PM 0830PM 



PH 213 



KOM 163 



Reading - Undergraduate 

CORRECT READ EL SCH 01499 READ-0413-01 3 

METH MAT TCH READ 01500 READ-0425-01 4 

METH MAT TCH READ 02372 READ-0425-02 4 

TCH RED CONTENT AREA 02373 READ-0446-01 3 

Special Education • Undergraduate 



SURVEY OF EXC CHILD 



02369 SPED-0301-03 



MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 



Elementary Education • Graduate 

KINDERGARTEN PRACT 
KINDERGARTEN PRACT 
ISS & TR IN TCH L A 
STRAT TEACH SCI ELEM 
INDIV INSTR ELEM SCH 

Reading - Graduate 

CORRECT READ EL SCH 
METH MAT TCH READ 
METH MAT TCH READ 



01503 READ-0513-01 3 

01504 READ-0525-01 4 

01505 READ-0525-02 4 



CREWS N 



HIGDON B 



METH & MAT EL L ARTS 


00438 


ELED-311A-03 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


104 


SOLLEY B 


METH & MAT EL L ARTS 


00440 


ELED-311A-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


104 


CREWS N 


METH & MAT EL L ARTS 


00439 


ELED-311A-05 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


104 


BERTRAND N 


METH MAT EL SCH MATH 


00443 


ELED-311D-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


123 


GOWER D 


ELEM CURR (K-4) 


00413 


ELED-0325-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


163 


GLASCOTT K 


ELEM CURR (5-8) 


00415 


ELED-0327-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


123 


JONES C 


KINDERGARTEN PROG 


00418 


ELED-0430-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


213 


GLASCOTT K 


KINDERGARTEN PRACT 


00420 


ELED-0431-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1130AM 


PCS 


TBA 


RINGT 


KINDERGARTEN PRACT 


00422 


ELED-0431-04 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




RINGT 



MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 200 


POOLE J 


MTWR 


1010AM 


0120PM 


PH 312 


POOLE J 


MTWR 


TBA 




COLUMBIA 


STAFF 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 163 


CREWS N 



CAMPBELL A 



00427 


ELED-0531-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1130AM 


PCS 


TBA 


RINGT 


02380 


ELED-0531-04 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




RINGT 


02371 


ELED-0613-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


163 


SOLLEY B 


00432 


ELED-0619-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


123 


JONES C 


00433 


ELED-0620-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


FH 


203 


GOWER D 



MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 200 


POOLE J 


MTWR 


1010AM 


0120PM 


PH 312 


POOLE J 


MTWR 


TBA 




COLUMBIA 


STAFF 



48 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



TCH READ CONTENT AREAS 
ISS & TR IN READ INS 



02385 
01506 



READ-0546-01 
READ-0612-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 



0730AM 
1010AM 



0950AM 
1230PM 



Special Education - Graduate 



THEO PERSP M/M DISABL 



ISS IN ASSES M/M DIS 



ANATOMY OF THE EYE 



BEGINNING BRAILLE 



ADVANCED BRAILLE 



BEGINNING PROCEDURES 



ADVANCED PROCEDURES 



ORIENT & MOBILITY 



(NATURE/NEEDS OF VI 



EXCEPT CHILD & YOUTH 
LAB EXP I 



KOM 
BAS 



FH 



163 
8339 



01701 SPED-0630-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 1110AM 

NOTE: SPED 630-01 meets June 7-25 inclusive. 

01702 SPED-0631-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0420PM LIB 
\Orf: SPED 0631-01 meets June 7-25 inclusive. 

01705 SPED-0650-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0650-01 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01706 SPED-0651-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0651-01 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01707 SPED-0652-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0652-0 1 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01708 SPED-0653-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0653-0 1 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01709 SPED-0654-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0654-0 1 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01710 SPED-0655-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0655-0 1 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25. 

01711 SPED-0656-01 3 MTWRF TBA TBA 
NOTE: SPED 0656-01 is part of the Vision Institute and meets June 7-25 

01714 SPED-0680-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM FH 

01719 SPED-0692-01 3 MTWRF 0730AM 1130AM KOM 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Special Education - Graduate 

IPRACTICUM 01712 SPED-0657-01 3 TBA TBA 

Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Elementary Education - Undergraduate 

EDUC TECH IN THE ELEM SCHOOL 00411 

£DUC TECH IN THE ELEM SCHOOL 00412 

EFFECT INSTR (K-4) 00416 

EFFECT INSTR (5-8) 00417 



TBA 



IReading - Undergraduate 

IMETH MAT TCH READ 



01501 READ-0425-03 



MTWR 1010AM 0120PM 



Special Education • Undergraduate 



SURVEY OF EXC CHILD 
METH/TECH BEHAV MAN 



01696 SPED-0301-04 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

01697 SPED-0424-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0430PM 

NOTE: SPED 0424-01 meets July 12-29. 



103B 



COLUMBIA 
PH 227 



CREWS N 
BERTRAND N 



204 


CALDER J 


001 


CALDER J 




STAFF 




STAFF 




STAFF 




TRENT S 




DePRIEST L 




STAFF 




TRENT S 


201 


CAMPBELL A 


105 


STAFF 



STAFF 



ELED-0225-02 


2 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0920AM 


LIB 


003 


MEANS H 


ELED-0225-03 


2 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0240PM 


KOM 


105 


MEANS H 


ELED-0405-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


104 


MEANS H 


ELED-0407-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


104 


BERGMAN R 



POOLE J 



MORICE H 
WALDROP P 



Elementary Education - Graduate 

£FFECT INSTR (K-4) 
STRAT TEACH MATH ELE 
SEM EARLY CHILDHOOD 
READING PROGRAM 
=VAL IN ELEM SCH 



00423 


ELED-0505-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


104 


MEANS H 


00431 


ELED-0618-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


158 


STAFF 


00435 


ELED-0622-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


123 


STAFF 


00461 


ELED-626R-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




WALDROP P 


02374 


ELED-0662-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


123 


BABBC 



49 



TITLE 

Reading - Graduate 

METH MAT TCH READ 
RESEARCH SEM IN READ 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



02381 
01507 



Special Education - Graduate 



METH TECH BEH MAN 



THEO OF INST M/M DIS 



PRACTICUM 



AFF ED IN CLASS 



ISS SPECIAL ED 



LAB EXP I 



02376 



02375 



02377 



01720 



READ-0525-03 
READ-0675-01 



MTWR 1010AM 
MTWR 1250PM 



SPED-0524-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 

NOTE: SPED 0524-01 meets July 12-29. 
SPED-0633-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 

NOTE: SPED 0633-01 meets July 12-29. 
SPED-0657-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: SPED 0657-02 meets July 6-30. 
SPED-0674-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: SPED 0674-01 meets July 12-29. 
SPED-0678-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 

NOTE: SPED 0678-01 meets July 12-29. 
SPED-0695-01 3 TBA TBA 



0120PM 
0310PM 



0430PM 



1110AM 



0430PM 



PH 1038 
KOM 162 



PH 



KOM 163 



TBA 



TBA 



FN 201 



POOLE J 

STAFF 



WALDROP P 



STAFF 



STAFF 



STAFF 



STAFF 



STAFF 



Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 

Dr. Jim Lorenz, Voorhies Industrial Studies 143, 898-2776 
Please contact department office for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00309 


CM-0332-01 


00572 


ET-480D-01 


02188 


ET-480E-01 


02387 


ET-480E-02 


02388 


ET-480E-03 


00573 


ET-480E-04 


00574 


ET-480E-05 


00576 


ET-480M-01 


00577 


ETIS-0293-01 


00578 


ETIS-0294-01 


00579 


ETtS-0392-01 


00581 


ETIS-0393-01 


00583 


ETIS-0397-01 


00584 


ETIS-0398-01 


00585 


ETIS-0479-01 


00587 


ETIS-0479-02 


00588 


ETIS-0479-03 


00591 


ETIS-0651-01 


00594 


ETIS-0652-01 


00597 


ETIS-0664-01 


00598 


ETIS-0664-02 


00599 


ETIS-0664-03 


00600 


ETIS-0664-04 


00601 


ETIS-0664-05 


00602 


ETIS-0664-06 


00604 


ETIS-0691-01 


00605 


ETIS-0692-01 


01978 


VTE-0641-01 


01979 


VTE-0641-02 


01981 


VTE-0651-01 


01982 


VTE-0651-02 


01984 


VTE-0664-01 


01985 


VTE-0664-02 


01986 


VTE-0664-03 


01987 


VTE-0664-04 


01988 


VTE-0664-05 


01989 


VTE-0664-06 


01990 


VTE-0664-07 


01991 


VTE-0664-08 


01992 


VTE-0664-09 


01993 


VTE-0664-10 


01994 


VTE-0664-11 


01995 


VTE-0664-12 











Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Construction Management - Undergraduate 



CONSTR & MATLS 

ARCH COMP-AID DFT/DES 



00308 
00309 



CM-0315-01 
CM-0332-01 



4 MTWR 0730AM 0220PM 

4 MTWR 0730AM 0220PM 



VIS 115 
AMG 116 



Engineering Technology - Undergraduate 



HATFIELD D 
CARTER A 



CADDI 


00556 


ET-0231-01 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0220PM 


AMG 


116 


CARTER A 


CADD II 


00558 


ET-0336-01 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0220PM 


AMG 


116 


CARTER A 


STATICS 


00560 


ET-0383-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


VIS 


242 


SRIDHARA B 


INTROD TO IND MGMT 


00562 


ET-0391-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


VIS 


243 


WALLS 


PROG LOGIC CONTR 


00566 


ET-0460-01 


2 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


VIS 


169 


SBENATY S 


DES ENGR TECH 


00572 


ET-480D-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




SRIDHARA B 


Engineering Technology 


and Industrial Studies 


■ Undergraduate 










SHOP PROBLEMS 


00585 


ETIS-0479-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 



50 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Construction Management - Graduate 

kpCH COMP/AIDED DRAFTING 02426 CM-0532-01 

ngineering Technology - Graduate 



00571 ET-0560-01 



>ROG LOGIC CONTR 

Session II Classes: 

Engineering Technology • 

Iengineering fund 
intro to elec/elec 
Dynamics 
industrial safety 
|-und comp inte mfg 

i^LEC/MECH ENGR TECH 
;LEC/MECH ENGR TECH 
■ILEC/MECH ENGR TECH 



ingineering Technology and Industrial Studies - Undergraduate 



MTWR 0730AM 0220PM 



MTWR 0100PM 0500PM 



AMG 116 CARTER A 



VIS 169 SBENATY S 



May 31 - July 


2 














Undergraduate 
















00555 


ET-0 184-01 




3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


VIS 243 


FOROUDASTAN S 


00559 


ET-0361-01 




4 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0550PM 


VIS 176 


CHENC 


00561 


ET-0384-01 




3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


VIS 243 


NASAB A 


00565 


ET-0442-01 




3 


TR 


0430PM 


0840PM 


VIS 242 


MATHIS M 


02250 


ET-0459-01 




3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITTR 


02188 


ET-480E-01 




1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


02387 


ET-480E-02 




2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


02388 


ET-480E-03 




3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 



IHOP PROBLEMS 



00587 ETIS-0479-02 



TBA 



industrial Education - Undergraduate 



SRS DEV OCCUP TECH ED 



00879 IED-0403-01 



TBA 



0730AM 1130AM 



TBA 



STAFF 



VIS 243 LORENZ J 



Engineering Technology - Graduate 



00570 


ET-0542-01 


3 


TR 


0430PM 


0840PM 


VIS 242 


MATHIS M 


02251 


ET-0559-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITT R 



MDUSTRIAL SAFETY 
UND COMP INTE MFG 



Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies • Graduate 

)ESIGN FOR ECON PROD 02195 ETIS-0611-01 3 TR 

ndustrial Education - Graduate 

RS DEV OCC/TECH ED 02189 IED-0503-01 3 MW 

Session III Classes: May 31 • August 7 

ngineering Technology • Undergraduate 



0600PM 0945PM 



0730AM 1130AM 



VIS 115 MC BRIDE R 



VIS 243 LORENZ J 



NJDUSTRIAL SEMINAR 


00567 


ET-0471-01 


1 


TR 


0230PM 


0400PM 


SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


NDUSTRIAL SEMINAR 


00568 


ET -0471 -02 


1 


TR 


0500PM 


0630PM 


SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


;LEC/MECH ENGR TECH 


00573 


ET-480E-04 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


;LEC/MECH ENGR TECH 


00574 


ET-480E-05 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


^ANUFAC ENGR TECH 


00576 


ET-480M-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


WALL B 


ilETHODS & WORK MEAS 

ngineering Technology 


02196 


ET-0494-01 


3 


TR 


0540PM 


0820PM 


SMYRNA 


WALL B 


and Industrial Studies • 


Undergraduate 








;OOP EDUC EXP 1 


00577 


■ETIS-0293-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


tOOP EDUC EXP II 


00578 


ETIS-0294-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


4D INTERNSHIP 1 


00579 


ETIS-0392-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


4D INTERNSHIP II 


00581 


ETIS-0393-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


!OOP EDUC EXP III 


00583 


ETIS-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 



51 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



COOP EDUC EXP IV 


00584 


ETIS-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


SHOP PROBLEMS 


00588 


ETIS-0479-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


Engineering Technology 


and Industrial Studies 


Graduate 




PROB IN IND STUDIES 


00591 


ETIS-0651-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


PROB IN IND STUDIES 


00594 


ETIS-0652-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00597 


ETIS-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00598 


ETIS-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00599 


ETIS-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00600 


ETIS-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00601 


ETIS-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


00602 


ETIS-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


PROBS IN PROD MGMT 


00604 


ETIS-0691-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


PROBS IN PROD MGMT 


00605 


ETIS-0692-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



Vocational-Technical Education - Graduate 



VOC-TECH ED CURR SYS 


02194 


VTE-0632-01 


3 


M 


0450PM 


0900PM 


VA 


100 


RICKETTS S 


VOC-TECH ED INTRNSHIP 


01978 


VTE-0641-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




RICKETTS S 


PROBS IN VOC-TECH 


01981 


VTE-0651-01 


3 


R 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


METHODS OF RESEARCH 


01983 


VTE-0662-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S130A 


LEWIS S 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01984 


VTE-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01985 


VTE-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01986 


VTE-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01987 


VTE-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01988 


VTE-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01989 


VTE-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies - Graduate 

COMP INTE DES & MFG 02249 ETIS-0637-01 3 TR 



0600PM 0945PM 



VIS 242 



REDDITT R 



Vocational-Technical Education - Graduate 



VOC-TECH ED INTRNSHIP 


01979 


VTE-0641-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


PROBS IN VOC-TECH 


01982 


VTE-0651-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01990 


VTE-0664-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01991 


VTE-0664-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01992 


VTE-0664-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01993 


VTE-0664-10 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01994 


VTE-0664-11 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01995 


VTE-0664-12 


6 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


RICKETTS S 


TBA 


LORENZ J 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 1 



English 



Dr. William Connelly, Peck Hall 302, 898-2573 

NOTE: All students will complete the required 12 semester hours of English General Studies bypassing the 
following courses in the sequence in which they are listed: ENGL 111; ENGL 112; ENGL 211; ENGL 221, 223, or 224. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00513 


ENGL-0355-01 


00530 


ENGL-0662-01 


00531 


ENGL-0664-01 


00532 


ENGL-0664-02 


00533 


ENGL-0664-03 


00534 


ENGL-0664-04 


00535 


ENGL-0664-05 


00536 


ENGL-0664-06 


00541 


ENGL-0760-01 



52 



riTLE 





CALL NO. 


COURSE ID HRS DAYS 


TIME 




LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 


00542 


ENGL-0761-01 


00543 ENGL-0762-01 




00544 


ENGL-0764-01 


00545 


ENGL-0764-02 


00546 ENGL-0764-03 




00547 


ENGL-0764-04 


00548 


ENGL-0764-05 


00549 ENGL-0764-06 









Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

inglish • Undergraduate 



XPERIENCEOFLIT 




00473 


ENGL-0211-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


307 


HOLTZCLAW R 


XPERIENCEOFLIT 




00474 


ENGL-0211-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




SHIPP B 


NOTE: ENCL 0211-02 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students 


enrolling 


in this telecourse are 


REQUIRED 




to attend orientation on Tuesday, May 1 1, 


in Room 103A Peck Hall from 4:00-6:00 p.m 










For more details, refer to Distance Learning on page 97. 








VESTERN AMERICAN LITERATURE 


00490 


ENGL-0223-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


308 


DONOVAN E 


,ONTEMPORARY SHORT STORY 


00491 


ENGL-0223-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


311 


CAIN J 


OUTHERN DRAMA AND FILM 


00492 


ENGL-0223-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0100PM 


0400PM 


PH 


308 


BRANTLEY W 


CI FICT & FANTASY 




00500 


ENGL-0305-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


305 


WOLFE C 


OUTHERN LITERATURE 




00503 


ENGL-0333-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


300A 


JACKSON J 


>EV SHORT STORY 




02078 


ENGL-0335-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


314A 


HIBBARD A 


OLK/FAIRY TALES 




02079 


ENGL-0359-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


322 


ORDOUBADIAN M 


URVEY OF MOD SATIRE 




00519 


ENGL-0375-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


304A 


GENTRY W 


NG DRAMA: 1580- 1642 




02077 


ENGL-0436-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


315 


DONOVAN K 


UNIOR INTER SEMINAR 




01971 


U H-350H-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


108 


HAGUE A 



lOTE: U H 350H topic is "The UFO Debate." 

tudents enrolling in U H 350H-01 may receive three hours upper division credit from the English Department. 



session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

inglish - Undergraduate 



OMPOSITION 


00464 


ENGL-0111-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


305 


LUTZA 


XPERIENCE OF LIT 


00475 


ENGL-0211-03 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


322 


DEANC 


XPERIENCE OF LIT 


00476 


ENGL-0211-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


322 


LAVERY D 


XPERIENCEOFLIT 


00477 


ENGL-0211-05 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


322 


DEANC 


XPERIENCE OF LIT 


00478 


ENGL-0211-06 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


307 


NETHM 


XPERIENCE OF LIT 


00479 


ENGL-0211-07 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


322 


THERRIEN K 


XPERIENCE OF LIT 


00480 


ENGL-0211-08 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




CLAYTON M 



NOTE: ENCL 0211-08 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Monday, May 31, in Room 103A in Peck Hall from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to Distance Learning on page 97. 

lAJ THEMES IN AM LIT 

|lAJ THEMES IN AM LIT 

I/OMEN IN LITERATURE 
ONTEMPORARY SHORT STORY 
ONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FIC 
ONTEMPORARY SHORT STORY 
ONTEM DRAMA AND FILM 
ONTEM WORLD IN LITERATURE 

NOTE: ENCL 0223-09 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 
to attend orientation on Monday, May 31, in Room 103A in Peck Hall from 4:00-6:00 p.m. 
For more details, refer to Distance Learning on page 97. 
fOMEN WRITERS 20TH C 02080 ENGL-0310-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM JH 238 BARNETT C 

NGL LIT: 1790-1850 00501 ENGL-0322-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM PH 315 NETHM 

JTH CENT AMER LIT 00502 ENGL-0332-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM PH 300A JACKSON J 

OUTHERN LITERATURE 02125 ENGL-0333-02 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM PH 311 HERRING R 



00485 


ENGL-0221-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


307 


JARMON L 


00486 


ENGL-0221-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


307 


HERRING R 


00493 


ENGL-0223-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


300A 


CANTRELL B 


00494 


ENGL-0223-05 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


311 


DURHAM C 


00495 


ENGL-0223-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


308 


MAPPL 


00496 


ENGL-0223-07 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


308 


BARNETT C 


00497 


ENGL-0223-08 


3 


TWR 


0500PM 


0800PM 


PH 


308 


BRANTLEY W 


00498 


ENGL-0223-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




SHIPP B 



53 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 

ADV COMPOSITION 

ADV COMPOSITION 

FOLK/FAIRY TALES 

LITERATURE AND FILM 

BRITISH POP CULTURE 

TRAGEDIES SHAKESPEARE 

MOD ENGLISH GRAMMAR & USAGE 

FILM THEORY & CRIT 



English • Graduate 

MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR 
MAJ AMER WRITER 



00508 
00510 
00511 
02081 
00516 
00518 
00522 
00523 
02083 



ENGL-0339-01 
ENGL-0350-01 
ENGL-0350-02 
ENGL-0359-02 
ENGL-0365-01 
ENGL-0370-01 
ENGL-0434-01 
ENGL-0451-01 
ENGL-0465-01 



MTWR 

MTWR 

TWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 



1010AM 
1010AM 
1000AM 
0730AM 
1250PM 
1250PM 
1250PM 
1250PM 
0330PM 



1230PM 
1230PM 
0100PM 
0950AM 
0310PM 
0310PM 
0310PM 
0310PM 
0550PM 



PH 304A 
PH 305 
COLUMBIA 
PH 308 



PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 



311 

314A 

300A 

305 

218 



HAGUE A 
COXB 
KINGR 

ORDOUBADIAN M j[ 
HARRIS T 
HAGUE A 
CANTRELL B 
COXB 
HOLTZCLAW R 



NOTE: ENCL 0465-01 topic Is "Documentary Film.' 



MAJ AMER WRITERS 



AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT 
COMPUTERS AND WRITING 



MAJ AMER WRITERS 
MAJ AMER WRITERS 



AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT 
COMPUTERS AND WRITING 



00525 ENGL-0551-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

02123 ENGL-633A-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

NOTE: ENCL 633A-01 topic is "Wallace Stevens." 
02119 ENGL-633B-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

NOTE: ENCL 633B-01 topic is "Wallace Stevens." 
00527 ENGL-0634-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

00529 ENGL-0658-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: ENCL 0658-01 is a computer-assisted instruction course. 

02111 ENGL-733A-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 
NOTE: ENCL 733A-01 topic is "Wallace Stevens." 

02112 ENGL-733B-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 
\Orf: ENCL 733B-01 topic is "Wallace Stevens." 

00538 ENGL-0734-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

00540 ENGL-0758-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: ENCL 0758-01 is a computer-assisted instruction course. 



PH 


305 


COXB 


PH 


301 


LAVERY D 


PH 


301 


LAVERY D 


PH 


301 


JARMON L 


PH 


327 


MAPPL 


PH 


301 


LAVERY D 


PH 


301 


LAVERY D 



PH 301 JARMON L 

PH 327 MAPP L 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

English • Undergraduate 



COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 
COMPOSITION 

English - Graduate 

DIR READING-RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
INTRNSHP/EXTRNSHP 
INTRNSHP/EXTRNSHP 
DIR READING-RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 



00465 


ENGL-0111-02 


3 


MW 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


304A 


KATES R 


00466 


ENGL-0111-03 


3 


MW 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


300B 


KIRKMAN K 


00469 


ENGL-0112-01 


3 


MW 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


305 


TORMEY W 


00470 


ENGL-01 12-02 


3 


MW 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


31 4A 


TORMEY W 


00471 


ENGL-01 12-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


300A 


KIRKMAN K 


00472 


ENGL-01 12-04 


3 


TR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


31 4A 


LLOYD M 


02120 


ENGL-0112-05 


3 


TR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


31 4A 


LLOYD M 



00530 


ENGL-0662-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00531 


ENGL-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


00532 


ENGL-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


00533 


ENGL-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00534 


ENGL-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


00535 


ENGL-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


00536 


ENGL-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


00541 


ENGL-0760-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00542 


ENGL-0761-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00543 


ENGL-0762-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00544 


ENGL-0764-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


00545 


ENGL-0764-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 
CONNELLY W 



54 



mE 

)ISSERTATION RESEARCH 
>ISSERTATION RESEARCH 
)ISSERTATION RESEARCH 
)ISSERTATION RESEARCH 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



00546 


ENGL-0764-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


00547 


ENGL-0764-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


00548 


ENGL-0764-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


00549 


ENGL-0764-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 



session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

inglish - Undergraduate 

;OMPOSITION 



02221 ENGL-0111-04 3 MTWR 0500PM 0720PM 

NOTE: ENGL 0111-04 is a computer-assisted instruction course. 



XPERIENCE OF LIT 
XPERIENCE OF LIT 
XPERIENCE OF LIT 
lAJ THEMES IN AM LIT 
1AJ THEMES IN AM LIT 
ANTASY LITERATURE 
lONTEMPORARY SHORT FICTION 
PORTS IN LITERATURE 
/OMEN & LITERATURE 
;ONTEM WORLD IN LITERATURE 



00481 
00482 
00483 
00488 
00489 
00499 
02102 
02103 
02416 
02127 



ENGL-0211-09 
ENGL-0211-10 
ENGL-0211-11 
ENGL-0221-03 
ENGL-0221-04 
ENGL-0223-10 
ENGL-0223-11 
ENGL-0223-12 
ENGL-0223-13 
ENGL-0223-14 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
TBA 



0730AM 
1010AM 
1250PM 
1250PM 
0600PM 
0730AM 
1010AM 
1010AM 
1010AM 
TBA 



0950AM 
1230PM 
0310PM 
0310PM 
0840PM 
0950AM 
1230PM 
1230PM 
1230PM 



LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


TBA 


CONNELLY W 


TBA 


CONNELLY W 


TBA 


CONNELLY W 


TBA 


CONNELLY W 



PH 

PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
TBA 



307 

307 

307 

308 

322 

308 

322 

304A 

308 



BROOKHART C 

JOHNSON N 
DUNNE S 
KOSTKOWSKA J 
BREWER G 
THERRIEN K 
SHERMAN T 
PETERSEN R 
KATES R 
KOSTKOWSKA J 
CLAYTON M 



NOTE: ENGL 0223-14 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Tuesday, July 6, in Room 103A in Peck Hall from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to Distance Learning on page 97. 



/OMEN IN FILM 


02104 


ENGL-0308-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


218 


DUNNE S 


DV COMPOSITION 


02105 


ENGL-0350-03 


3 


MTWF 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


300A 


LEVINE W 


OETRY WRITING 


00513 


ENGL-0355-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


300A 


BREWER G 


URVEY POP CULTURE 


02106 


ENGL-0361-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


322 


DUNNE M 


KDDERN POETRY 


02107 


ENGL-0445-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


305 


PETERSEN R 


OD ENGLISH GRAMMAR & USAGE 02108 


ENGL-0451-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


311 


JOHNSON N 


1ST OF ENG LANG 


00524 


ENGL-0453-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


305 


SHERMAN T 



nglish - Graduate 

lODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR 
lAJ AMER WRITER 



lAJ AMER WRITERS 

ATIRE 

EOWULF 

lAJ AMER WRITERS 

AJ AMER WRITERS 

ATIRE 



02109 ENGL-0551-02 3 
02124 ENGL-633A-02 3 

NOTE: ENGL 633A-02 topic 
02126 ENGL-633B-02 3 

NOTE: ENGL 633B-02 topic 

02110 ENGL-0637-01 3 
02348 ENGL-0702-01 3 

02222 ENGL-733A-02 3 
NOTE: ENGL 733A-02 topic 

02223 ENGL-733B-02 3 
NOTE: ENGL 733B-02 topic 

02113 ENGL-0737-01 3 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
is "Nathaniel Hawthorne." 

MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
is "Nathaniel Hawthorne." 

MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

TBA TBA 

MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
is "Nathaniel Hawthorne." 

MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
is "Nathaniel Hawthorne." 

MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



PH 


311 


JOHNSON N 


PH 


301 


DUNNE M 


PH 


301 


DUNNE M 


PH 


301 


GENTRY W 


TBA 




SHERMAN T 


PH 


301 


DUNNE M 


PH 


301 


DUNNE M 


PH 


301 


GENTRY W 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W - Wednesday R- Thursday F - Friday S- Saturday TR • Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and above are open only to graduate students. 



55 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Environmental Science and Technology 

Dr. Kathy Mathis, Midgett Business Building 204, 898-2113 
Note: Please see the Biology and Chemistry departmental listing for 100 level courses. 

Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Biology 



MICROBIOLOGY 



MICROBIOLOGY 



00164 BIOL-0216-01 



00165 BIOL-0216-02 



Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 



CADDI 
STATICS 



00556 ET -0231 -01 
00560 ET-0383-01 



4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


131 


DE LOS REYES 




MTWRF 


1000AM 


1220PM 


DSB 


101 




4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1220PM 


DSB 


131 


ROSING W 




MTWRF 


0730AM 


0950AM 


DSB 


101 




4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0220PM 


AMG 


116 


CARTER A 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


VIS 


242 


SRIDHARA B 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Biology 



MICROBIOLOGY 
GENERAL ECOLOGY 
GENERAL ECOLOGY 



00166 


BIOL-0216-03 


4 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1140AM 


DSB 


131 


WRIGHT S 








MTWR 


0730AM 


0900AM 


DSB 


101 




00181 


BIOL-0424-01 


4 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0835AM 


WPS 


310 


MULLEN D 








MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


WPS 


310 




00182 


BIOL-0424-02 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


1110AM 


DSB 


137 


HOWARD R 








F 


0730AM 


0910AM 


DSB 


137 





\ 



Chemistry 

ELEM OF ORG CHEM 



00244 CHEM-0303-01 4 MTWRF 0845AM 1220PM 

NOTE: CH£M 0303 meet times include lecture and lab. 



Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 



DSB 106 



Physics and Astronomy 



NOTE: Students enrolling in PHYS 0231 or 235 lecture should enroll in a PHYS 0233 lab section. 



KLINE P 



ENGINEERING FUND 


00555 


ET-01 84-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


VIS 


243 


FOROUDASTAN J 


INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 


00565 


ET -0442-01 


3 


TR 


0430PM 


0840PM 


VIS 


242 


MATHIS M 


Geography and Geology 




















PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 


02146 


GEOL-0201-01 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


300 


BORDINE B 










MTR 


1010AM 


1210PM 


KOM 


320 





COLLEGE PHYSICS 1 


01316 


PHYS-0231-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


WPS 


220 


MOODY T 


COLLEGE PHYSICS 1 


01317 


PHYS-0231-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


220 


CARLTON R 


INTRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01319 


PHYS-0233-01 


1 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


WPS 


211 


CARLTON R 


INTRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01320 


PHYS-0233-02 


1 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


211 


MOODY T 


INTRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01321 


PHYS-0233-03 


1 


MWR 


1120AM 


0200PM 


WPS 


211 


WELLER M 


UNIVERSITY PHYSICS 1 


01324 


PHYS-0235-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


213 


WELLER M 



56 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 



Agribusiness and Agriscience 

SOIL SURV & LAND USE 00011 ABAS-0435-01 3 MW 0600PM 0810PM SAG 206 ANDERSON W 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 



Biology 

MICROBIOLOGY 



00167 BIOL-0216-04 4 MTWRF 0730AM 0910AM DSB 121 ZAMORA J 

MTWR 1000AM 1130AM DSB 101 



Physics and Astronomy 

COLLEGE PHYSICS II 01318 PHYS-0232-01 3 MTWRF 0730AM 0910AM WPS 213 HENDERSON R 

NOTE: Students enrolling in PHYS 0232 or PHYS 0236 lecture should enroll in a PHYS 0234 lab section. 

INTRO PHYSICS LAB II 01322 PHYS-0234-01 1 MTWRF 0730AM 0910AM WPS 212 MONTEMAYOR V 

INTRO PHYSICS LAB II 01323 PHYS-0234-02 1 MTWRF 0925AM 1105AM WPS 212 HENDERSON R 

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II 01325 PHYS-0236-01 3 MTWRF 0925AM 1105AM WPS 213 MONTEMAYOR V 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a PHYS 0236 lecture section should enroll in a PHYS 0234 lab section. 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Dr. Judith Rusciolelli, Boutwell Dramatic Arts 301, 898-2981 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

f rench - Undergraduate 

TOPICS IN FREN FILM 02184 FREN-0415-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM BDA 303B MC CASH J 



French - Graduate 

TOPICS IN FREN FILM 



02187 FREN-0515-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM BDA 303B MC CASH J 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

French • Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY FRENCH 00666 FREN-0111-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BDA 307 MC CASH J 

German - Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN 00707 GERM-0111-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BDA 305 HARPER A 



Spanish - Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY SPANISH 
ELEMENTARY SPANISH 



INTEN CONVERSATNL SP 



01687 SPAN-0111-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

01689 SPAN-0112-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: Prerequisite for SPAN 0112 is SPAN 0111 or equivalent. 
01691 SPAN-0305-01 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: SPAN 0305-01 is a study abroad class in Spain. 



BDA 


314 


CONLEY P 


BDA 
TBA 


307 


DIAZO 
NOVELLA N 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W- Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR -Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and at>ove are open only to graduate students. 



57 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

French - Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY FRENCH 
FRENCH: STUDY ABROAD 

German - Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

Spanish - Undergraduate 

ELEMENTARY SPANISH 
ELEMENTARY SPANISH 



00667 FREN-0112-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: Prerequisite for FREN 0112 is FREN 0111 or equivalent. 

02017 FREN-0390-01 3 TBA TBA 



00708 GERM-01 12-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: Prerequisite for CERM 0112 is CERM 0111 or equivalent. 



BDA 314 



TBA 



BDA 305 



STAFF 



KEWR 



HARPER A 



BDA 
BDA 



309 
307 



01688 SPAN-0111-02 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

01690 SPAN-01 12-02 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: Prerequisite for SPAN 0112 is SPAN 0111 or equivalent. 

Geography and Geology 

Dr. Ronald L. Zawislak, Kirksey Old Main 325B, 898-2726 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(e5). 



RUSCIOLELLI J 
MORRIS R 



00690 


GEOG-340A-01 


02213 


GEOG-340B-01 


00692 


GEOG-540A-01 


02214 


GEOG-540B-01 


02147 


GEOL-0409-01 


02148 


GEOL-0409-02 


02149 


GEOL-0409-03 


02151 


GEOL-0509-01 


02152 


GEOL-0509-02 


02153 


GEOL-0509-03 


02145 


GEOL-340C-01 


02150 


GEOL-540C-01 



Session I Classes: May 11-28 



Geography - Undergraduate 



FIELD COURSE 



00690 GEOG-340A-01 4 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



HEFFINGTON J 



Geology - Undergraduate 



NOTE: Students enrolling in CEOL 0100 in summer lecture section must enroll in the same CEOL 100L lab section. 
No repeats without taking CEOL 100L concurrently. 
INTRO EARTH SCI 00695 GEOL-0100-01 3 MTWRF 0840AM 1140AM 

INTRO EARTH SCI 00696 GEOL-0100-02 3 MTWRF 1150AM 0250PM 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CEOL 100L lab section must enroll in the same CEOL 0100 lecture section. 
No repeats in summer without taking CEOL 0100 concurrently. 
INTRO EARTH SCI LAB 00702 GEOL-100L-01 1 MTWR 0900AM 1100AM 

INTRO EARTH SCI LAB 00701 GEOL-100L-02 1 MTWR 1230PM 0230PM 

FIELD COURSE 02145 GEOL-340C-01 4 TBA TBA 



Geography - Graduate 



FIELD COURSE 
FIELD COURSE 



00692 
02150 



GEOG-540A-01 
GEOL-540C-01 



TBA 
TBA 



TBA 
TBA 



KOM 300 


ZAWISLAK H 


KOM 300 


OGDEN A 


> lecture section. 




KOM 320 


OGDEN A 


KOM 320 


ZAWISLAK R 


TBA 


CRIBB J 


TBA 


HEFFINGTON J 


TBA 


CRIBB J 



Session 11 Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Geography - Undergraduate 



INTRO REGIONAL GEOG 
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 
FIELD COURSE 



00673 


PEOG-0200-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 326 


HENRY J 


02212 


GEOG-0233-01 


4 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0410PM 


KOM 326 


HENRY J 


02213 


GEOG-340B-01 


4 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


GARBHARRAN H 



58 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Geology - Undergraduate 

NTRO EARTH SCI 00697 GEOL-01 00-03 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM KOM 300 BORDINE B 

NOTE: Students enrolling in CBOL 0100 in summer lecture section must enroll in the SMne CEOL 100L lab section. 
No repeats without taking CEOL 100L concurrently. 
NTRO EARTH SCI LAB 00703 GEOL-100L-03 1 MTR 0330PM 0530PM KOM 320 ZAWISLAK R 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CEOL 100L lab section must enroll in the same CEOL 0100 lecture section. 
No repeats in summer without taking CEOL 0100 concurrently. 
'HYSICAL GEOLOGY 02146 GEOL-0201-01 4 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM KOM 300 BORDINE B 

MTR 1010AM 1210PM KOM 320 



jeography - Graduate 

lELD COURSE 



02214 GEOG-540B-01 



TEA 



GARBHARRAN H 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 



jeography - Undergraduate 

'OLITICAL GEOG 00684 GEOG-0433-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM KOM 324 O FARRELL P 



jeology - Undergraduate 



•ROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY 


02147 


GEOL-0409-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


>ROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY 


02148 


GEOL-0409-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


>ROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY 


02149 


GEOL-0409-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



jeography - Graduate 

OLITICAL GEOG 



02386 GEOG-0533-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



KOM 324 



O FARRELL P 



jeology • Graduate 

'ROB IN GEOL 
'ROB IN GEOL 
'ROB IN GEOL 



02151 GEOL-0509-01 1 TBA TBA 

02152 GEOL-0509-02 2 TBA TBA 

02153 GEOL-0509-03 3 TBA TBA 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 



jeography - Undergraduate 

MTRO REGIONAL GEOG 00674 GEOG-0200-02 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM KOM 326 



HEFFINGTON J 



jeology - Undergraduate 

NOTE: Students enrolling in CEOL 0100 in summer lecture section must enroll in the same CEOL 100L lab section. 
No repeats without taking CEOL 100L concurrently. 

*JTRO EARTH SCI 00698 GEOL-0100-04 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM KOM 300 HARRIS C 

>4TR0 EARTH SCI 00699 GEOL-01 00-05 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM KOM 300 CRIBB J 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a CEOL 100L lab section must enroll in the same CEOL 0100 lecture section. 
No repeats in summer without taking CEOL 0100 concurrently. 

>JTRO EARTH SCI LAB 00704 GEOL-100L-04 1 MTR 1010AM 1210PM KOM 320 HARRIS C 

vlTRO EARTH SCI LAB 00705 GEOL-100L-05 1 MTR 1250PM 0250PM KOM 320 CRIBB J 



M - Monday T - Tuesday W - Wednesday R • Thursday F - Friday S - Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and above are open only to graduate students. 



59 



TITLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS TIME LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

Global Studies 

Dr. Anne Sloan, Peck Hall 252, 898-5091 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

00672 GS-0301-01 

Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

FIELD EXPERIENCES 00672 G S-0301-01 3 TBA TBA TBA SLOAN A 

Healthy Physical Education^ Recreation^ and Safety 

Dr. Martha Whaley, Murphy Center 111, 898-281 1 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00143 


ATHT-0443-01 


00144 


ATHT-0561-01 


00839 


HLTH-0492-01 


00840 


HLTH-0492-02 


00841 


HLTH-0492-03 


00842 


HLTH-0492-04 


00843 


HLTH-0492-05 


00844 


HLTH-0492-06 


00845 


HLTH-0492-07 


00846 


HLTH-0492-08 


00847 


HLTH-0492-09 


00850 


HLTH-0664-01 


00851 


HLTH-0664-02 


00852 


HLTH-0664-03 


00853 


HLTH-0664-04 


00854 


HLTH-0664-05 


00855 


HLTH-0664-06 


00858 


HLTH-0691-01 


00859 


HLTH-0691-02 


00860 


HLTH-0691-03 


00861 


HLTH-0691-04 


00862 


HLTH-0691-05 


00863 


HLTH-0691-06 


00864 


HLTH-0691-07 


00865 


HLTH-0691-08 


00866 


HLTH-0691-09 


00867 


HLTH-0691-10 


00868 


HLTH-0691-11 


00869 


HLTH-0691-12 


02334 


PHED-0425-01 


01245 


PHED-0492-01 


01244 


PHED-0492-02 


01246 


PHED-0492-03 


01247 


PHED-0492-04 


01248 


PHED-0492-05 


01249 


PHED-0492-06 


01250 


PHED-0492-07 


01251 


PHED-0492-08 


01252 


PHED-0492-09 


01259 


PHED-0664-01 


01260 


PHED-0664-02 


01261 


PHED-0664-03 


01262 


PHED-0664-04 


01263 


PHED-0664-05 


01264 


PHED-0664-06 


02335 


PHED-0688-01 


02336 


PHED-0688-02 


01270 


PHED-0691-01 


01271 


PHED-0691-02 


01272 


PHED-0691-03 


01273 


PHED-0691-04 


01274 


PHED-0691-05 


01275 


PHED-0691-06 


01276 


PHED-0691-07 


01277 


PHED-0691-08 


01278 


PHED-0691-09 


01279 


PHED-0691-10 


01280 


PHED-0691-11 


01281 


PHED-0691-12 


01286 


PHED-0706-01 


01287 


PHED-0706-02 


01288 


PHED-0706-03 


02425 


PHED-0760-01 


01295 


PHED-0761-01 


01296 


PHED-0761-02 


01298 


PHED-0764-01 


01299 


PHED-0764-02 


01300 


PHED-0764-03 


01301 


PHED-0764-04 


01302 


PHED-0764-05 


01303 


PHED-0764-06 


01510 


REC-0356-01 


01516 


REC-0492-01 


01517 


REC-0492-02 


01518 


REC-0492-03 


01519 


REC-0492-04 


01520 


REC-0492-05 


01521 


REC-0492-06 


01522 


REC-0492-07 


01523 


REC-0492-08 


01524 


REC-0492-09 


01528 


REC-0556-01 


01533 


REC-0664-01 


01534 


REC-0664-02 


01535 


REC-0664-03 


01536 


REC-0664-04 


01537 


REC-0664-05 


01538 


REC-0664-06 


01540 


REC-0691-01 


01541 


REC-0691-02 


01542 


REC-0691-03 


01543 


REC-0691-04 


01544 


REC-0691-05 


01545 


REC-0691-06 


01546 


REC-0691-07 


01547 


REC-0691-08 


01548 


REC-0691-09 


01549 


REC-0691-10 


01550 


REC-0691-11 


01551 


REC-0691-12 


01552 


REC-490A-01 


01553 


REC-490A-02 


01554 


REC-490B-01 


01555 


REC-490B-02 


01556 


REC-490C-01 


01557 


REC-490C-02 


01626 


SAFE-0432-01 


01627 


SAFE-0435-01 


01628 


SAFE-0485-01 


01629 


SAFE-0487-01 


01630 


SAFE-0532-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Athletic Coaching - Undergraduate 



SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 


00134 


ATHC-0406-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


104 


SOLOMON A 


ADV COACH FOOTBALL 


02412 


ATHC-0460-01 


2 


MTWR 


0400PM 


0620PM 


MC 


100B 


FIVEASH T i 


ADM H S COLLEGI ATHL 


02411 


ATHC-0480-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


101 


COLCLOUGH S | 



60 



riTLE CAIL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

\thletic Training - Undergraduate 

rOPICS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 00142 ATHT-0259-01 



TIME 



MTWR 0800AM 1020AM 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



AMG 219 



WHITEHILL W 



Health - Undergraduate 

EFFECTIVE LIVING 
EFFECTIVE LIVING 
EFFECTIVE LIVING 
EFFECTIVE LIVING 



00814 


HLTH-0310-01 


2 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1020AM 


MC 


105 


NEALS 


00815 


HLTH-0310-02 


2 


MTW 


0900AM 


1215PM 


MC 


103 


WHALEY M 


00816 


HLTH-0310-03 


2 


MTW 


0600PM 


0915PM 


MC 


101 


MAC BETH J 


00817 


HLTH-0310-04 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




MAC BETH J 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-04 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Tuesday, May 1 1, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



EFFECTIVE LIVING 



02303 HLTH-0310-05 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



BARTLEY D 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-05 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Wednesday, May 12, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



=ST AID SAFETY ED 


00828 


HLTH-0330-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1030AM 


AMG 


210 


HAYES D 


=ST AID SAFETY ED 


00829 


HLTH-0330-02 


3 


MTWRF 


1030AM 


0230PM 


AMG 


210 


GINANNI M 


rHE SCH HEALTH PROG 


00831 


HLTH-0430-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100B 


WILCOX S 


WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 


00835 


HLTH-0434-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 


rCH HUMAN SEXUALITY 


02355 


HLTH-0436-01 


3 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0500PM 


MC 


102 


ELLIS C 


=IRST AID FOR CHILDREN 


00837 


HLTH-0437-01 


2 


MTWR 


1030AM 


1250PM 


AMG 


219 


NEALS 


5PECIAL PROBLEMS 


00839 


HLTH-0492-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


00840 


HLTH-0492-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


00841 


HLTH-0492-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



Physical Education • Undergraduate 



SOCIAL DANCE 


01193 


PHED-0102-01 


1 


MTWR 


1000AM 


1200PM 


MC 


DS-A 


HOLLAND A 


FENNIS (BEGINNERS) 


01194 


PHED-0104-01 


1 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


0950AM 


MC 


AR-N 


NANCE A 


■ENNIS (BEGINNERS) 


01195 


PHED-01 04-02 


1 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1150AM 


MC 


AR-N 


NANCE A 


JOWLING 


01199 


PHED-0108-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0320PM 


MC 


AR-B 


NANCE A 


NOTE: PHED 0108-01 has a fee of $30 required by 


second meeting 


which includes 30 games 


shoes. 


and practices. 




Classes meet at Bowling 


Lanes on second class meeting. 








)EG AEROBICS 


01203 


PHED-0118-01 


1 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


AR-A 


HOLLAND A 


lEG AEROBICS 


01204 


PHED-01 18-02 


1 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


MC 


AR-A 


ALLSBROOK L 


AEROBIC DANCE 


01206 


PHED-0119-01 


1 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0640PM 


MC 


DS-A 


STAFF 


NTERMEDIATE BICYCLING 


01208 


PHED-01 26-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0330PM 


MC 


100B 


MC FARLIN M 


NOTE: All PHED 0202 classes have a 


fee of approximately $30 which includes green fees, range balls, and practice 


facilities. 


iOLF 


01209 


PHED-0202-01 


1 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


AMG 


ARENA 


SCARLETT J 


50LF 


01210 


PHED-0202-02 


1 


MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


AMG 


ARENA 


SCARLETT J 


JOLF 


01213 


PHED-0202-03 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0320PM 


AMG 


ARENA 


STAFF 


IWIMMING (BEGINNERS) 


01215 


PHED-0204-01 


1 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0320PM 


POOL 


100 


COLLIER G 


•.CUBA DIVING 


01217 


PHED-0212-01 


2 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


POOL 


100 


NUNLEYJ 


NOTE: All PHED 02 12 classes must provide 


own 


masks, snorkels, Hns, and boots - approxima 


ely $75. 






Swimsuits are required the first day of class for testing. 








lASIC LIFEGUARDING 


01220 


PHED-0214-01 


1 


MTWR 


1000AM 


1220PM 


POOL 


100 


COLLIER G 


»/ORKSHOPS IN WELLNESS 


01221 


PHED-0325-01 


3 


MTWR 


0900AM 


0100PM 


AMG 


119 


WINBORN J 


IRST AID SAFETY ED 


02304 


PHED-0330-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


1030AM 


AMG 


210 


HAYES D 


IRST AID SAFETY ED 


02306 


PHED-0330-02 


3 


MTWRF 


1030AM 


0230PM 


AMG 


210 


GINANNI M 


iA-GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 


01222 


PHED-0343-01 


2 


MTWR 


1230PM 


0250PM 


MC 


DS-A 


HOLLAND A 


i-T: TCH IND-DUAL SP 


02356 


PHED-0374-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


GYM2 


CHAMBERS K 


;URRICULUM IN P E 


01230 


PHED-0378-01 


2 


MTWR 


0100PM 


0320PM 


MC 


103 


ALLSBROOK L 


RIN EX PRESC/ASSESS 


01236 


PHED-0424-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


AMG 


153 


MICHAEL T 



61 



TITLE 

WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 
MEAS & EVAL 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

Recreation - Undergraduate 



CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


01238 


PHED-0434-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 


01240 


PHED-0481-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


AMG 


103 


MC CLELLAN P 


01245 


PHED-0492-01 


2 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1020AM 


JH 


133 


WHALEY M 


01244 


PHED-0492-02 


,1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01246 


PHED-0492-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 







NOTE: A $50 lab fee 


is required for REC 0357. 








WILDERNESS SKILLS 


01511 


REC-0357-01 


3 


MTWR 


0830AM 


1230PM 


AMG 


122 


CUNNINGHAM P 


WILDERNESS SKILLS 


02421 


REC-0357-02 


3 


MTWR 


0830AM 


1230PM 


JH 


234 


FRAUMAN E 


WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 


01512 


REC-0434-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 


RECREATIONAL THERAPY TECH 


01513 


REC-0448-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


MC 


102 


SHELAR V 


OUTDOOR REC WORKSHOP 


01514 


REC-0457-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


113 


PATTERSON L 


INTERNSHIP IN THER REC 


01552 


REC-490A-01 


9 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


116 


SHELAR V 


INTERNSHIP OUTDOOR REC 


01554 


REC-490B-01 


9 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


113 


LALANCE R 


INTERNSHIP IN RECREATION 


01556 


REC-490C-01 


9 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


116 


SHELAR V 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01516 


REC-0492-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01517 


REC-0492-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01518 


REC-0492-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



Athletic Coaching - Graduate 

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 
ADV COACH FOOTBALL 
ADM H S COLLEGI ATHL 



00139 


ATHC-0506-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


02414 


ATHC-0560-01 


2 


MTWR 


0400PM 


0620PM 


MC 


02413 


ATHC-0580-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 



104 SOLOMON A 

100B FIVEASH T 
101 COLCLOUGHS 



Health - Graduate 

WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 



00848 HLTH-0534-01 3 

00858 HLTH-0691-01 1 

00859 HLTH-0691-02 2 

00860 HLTH-0691-03 3 



MTWR 0800AM 1200PM MC 100A LALANCE R 

TBA TBA MC 111 WHALEY M 

TBA TBA MC 111 WHALEY M 

TBA TBA MC 111 WHALEY M 



Physical Education - Graduate 



PRIN EX PRESC/ASSESS 


01253 


PHED-0524-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


AMG 


153 


MICHAEL T 


WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 


01254 


PHED-0534-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01270 


PHED-0691-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01271 


PHED-0691-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01272 


PHED-0691-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



Recreation - Graduate 



WELL-HLTH LIFESTYLES 


01525 


REC-0534-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 


REC THERAPY TECHNIQUES 


01526 


REC-0548-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


MC 


102 


SHELAR V 


OUTDOOR REC WORKSHOP 


01529 


REC-0557-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


113 


PATTERSON L 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01540 


REC-0691-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01541 


REC-0691-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


INDEP STUDY HPER 


01542 


REC-0691-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Athletic Coaching - Undergraduate 



SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 
PSY OF COACHING 



02422 
00137 



ATHC-0406-02 
ATHC-0469-01 



MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 
MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



PH 
MC 



206 

104 



WHITESIDE H 
SOLOMON A 



62 



rrriE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



3ance - Undergraduate 



5-T: TCH RHYTH ACT 



Health • Undergraduate 



02357 DANC-0470-01 3 MTWRF 1250PM 0310PM 

NOTE: DANC 0470-01 meets May 31-fune 30 inclusive. 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



MC DS-A HOLLAND A 



;OMM & PUBLIC HEALTH 


02309 


HLTH-0231-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


100B 


WALKER J 


TFECTIVE LIVING 


00818 


HLTH-0310-06 


2 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1140AM 


MC 


103 


NEALS 


FFECTIVE LIVING 


00819 


HLTH-0310-07 


2 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1140AM 


MC 


100B 


NANCE A 


FFECTIVE LIVING 


00820 


HLTH-0310-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




MAC BETH J 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-08 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Monday, May 31, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



IFFECTIVE LIVING 



00821 HLTH-0310-09 



TBA 



TBA 



WALKER J 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-09 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Tuesday, June 1, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



ERSONAL HEALTH 


00827 


HLTH-0311-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


103 


NEAl. S 


ST AID SAFETY ED 


00830 


HLTH-0330-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0550PM 


0810PM 


AMG 


210 


GINANNI M 






NOTE: HLTH 0330-03 meets 


May 31 -June 30 inclusive. 








HE SCH HEALTH PROG 


00833 


HLTH-0430-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


AMG 


103 


WINBORN J 


HE SCH HEALTH PROG 


00834 


HLTH-0430-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


101 


ELLIS C 


RUG & VIOLENCE ED 


02359 


HLTH-0440-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


AMG 


103 


WINBORN J 


PECIAL PROBLEMS 


00842 


HLTH-0492-04 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


PECIAL PROBLEMS 


00843 


HLTH-0492-05 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


PECIAL PROBLEMS 


00844 


HLTH-0492-06 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



'hysical Education • Undergraduate 



OCIAL DANCE 



HOLLAND A 



02310 PHED-0102-02 1 MTWRF 1010AM 1140AM MC DS-A 
NOTE: PHED 0102-02 meets May 31 -June 30 inclusive. The dance is primarily swing. 

ENNIS (BEGINNERS) 01196 PHED-0104-03 1 MTWR 1250PM 0220PM MC AR-N NANCE A 

OWLING 01200 PHED-0108-02 1 MTW 0330PM 0520PM MC AR-B ALLSBROOK L 

NOTE: PHED 0108-02 has a fee of $30 required by second class meeting which includes thirty games, shoes, and practice. 
Classes meet at Bowling Lanes on second class meeting. 
ACQUETBALL 01202 PHED-01 17-01 1 MTWR 1250PM 0220PM 

EG AEROBICS 02424 PHED-0118-03 1 MTWRF 0730AM 0900AM 

NOTE: PHED 0118-03 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 
EROBIC DANCE 01207 PHED-01 19-02 1 MTWR 0500PM 0630PM 

OLF 01211 PHED-0202-04 1 MTWR 0730AM 0900AM 

NOTE: All PHED 0202 classes have a fee of approximately $30 which includes green fees, range balls, and practice facilities. 
WIMMING (BEGINNERS) 01216 PHED-0204-02 1 MTWR 1010AM 1140AM POOL 100 COLLIER G 

CUBA DIVING 01218 PHED-0212-02 2 MTWR 0330PM 0500PM POOL 100 

NOTE: All PHED 0212 classes must provide own masks, snorkels, fins, and boots - approximately $75. 
Swimsuits are required the first day of class for testing. 

02311 PHED-0330-03 3 MTWRF 0550PM 0810PM 
\Orf: PHED 0330-03 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 



MC 


HBCT 


STAFF 


MC 


AR-N 


HOLLAND A 


MC 


DS-B 


STAFF 


AMG 


ARENA 


STAFF 



RST AID SAFETY ED 



AMG 210 



NUNLEYJ 



GINANNI M 



A-GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 
•T TCH FITNESS ACT 
•T TCH TEAM GAMES 
URRICULUM IN P E 
DUNDATIONS OF P E 

DAPTIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 



01223 
01225 
02312 
01231 
01234 



PHED-0343-02 
PHED-0372-01 
PHED-0375-01 
PHED-0378-02 
PHED-0385-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 



1010AM 
1010AM 
0730AM 
1250PM 



MTWRF 1250PM 



1140AM 
1230PM 
0950AM 
0220PM 
0310PM 



MC 
AMG 
MC 
MC 

MC 



NOTE: PHED 0385-01 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 

01235 PHED-0395-01 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 



GYM2 

210 

GYM2 

102 

100B 

103 



CHAMBERS K 
ALLSBROOK L 
CHAMBERS K 
ALLSBROOK L 
PATTERSON L 

COLCLOUGH S 



63 



TITLE 

S-T:TCH RHYTH ACT 

MEAS & EVAL 
KINESIOLOGY 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

Recreation - Undergraduate 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



01239 PHED-0470-01 3 MTWRF 1250PM 0310PM 
NOTE: PHED 0470-01 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 

01241 PHED-0481-02 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

01243 PHED-0491-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

01247 PHED-0492-04 1 TBA TBA 

01248 PHED-0492-05 2 TBA TBA 

01249 PHED-0492-06 3 TBA TBA 



0310PM 



PROG PLAN REC & PRKS 


02315 


REC-0353-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01519 


REC-0492-04 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01520 


REC-0492-05 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01521 


REC-0492-06 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

MC DS-A HOLLAND A 

MC 102 MCCLELLANP 

MC 101 MAC BETH J 

MC 111 WHALEY M 

MC 111 WHALEY M 

MC 111 WHALEY M 



MC 105 FRAUMAN E 

MC 111 WHALEY M 

MC 111 WHALEY M 

MC 111 WHALEY M 



Athletic Coaching - Graduate 



SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 


02423 


ATHC-0506-02 


3 


MTWR 1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


206 


WHITESIDE H 


PSY OF COACHING 


00140 


ATHC-0569-01 


3 


MTWR 1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


104 


SOLOMON A 


Dance - Graduate 


















S-T:TCH RHYTH ACT 


02358 


DANC-0570-01 


3 


MTWRF 1250PM 


0310PM 


MC 


DS-A 


HOLLAND A 



NOTE: DANC 0570-01 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 



Health - Graduate 

INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
PRIN/PHIL SCH HLTH 

Physical Education - Graduate 

S-T:TCH RHYTH ACT 

KINESIOLOGY 
ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL ED 
ADM & SUPERV P E 

MEAS EXERCISE/SPORT 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
RESSEM IN HP 
HIST OF PHY EDU 
FIELD WORK & LAB EXP 
TCH PRAC HP 

Recreation - Graduate 

OUTDOOR ENVIRON EDUC 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 



00861 


HLTH-0691-04 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


00862 


HLTH-0691-05 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


00863 


HLTH-0691-06 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


02360 


HLTH-0693-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


MC 


101 


ELLIS C 



01255 


PHED-0570-01 


3 


MTWRF 


1250PM 


0310PM 


MC 


DS-A 


HOLLAND A 




NOTE: PHED 0570-01 meet 


May 31-June 30 inclusive. 








01256 


PHED-0591-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


101 


MAC BETH J 


01257 


PHED-0595-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


MC 


103 


COLCLOUGH S 


01266 


PHED-0682-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


100A 


LALANCE R 




NOTE: PHED 0682-01 meets May 31-June 30 inclusive. 








01267 


PHED-0683-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


AMG 


153 


MC CLELLAN P 


01273 


PHED-0691-04 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01274 


PHED-0691-05 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01275 


PHED-0691-06 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


02313 


PHED-0703-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


104 


SOLOMON A 


02314 


PHED-0704-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


102 


COLCLOUGH S 


01286 


PHED-0706-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01295 


PHED-0761-01 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


114 


WILCOX S 



02337 


REC-0655-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


AMG 


119 


FRAUMAN E 


01543 


REC-0691-04 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01544 


REC-0691-05 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01545 


REC-0691-06 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



64 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Athletic Training • Undergraduate 

PRACT IN ATH TRAIN 



Health - Undergraduate 

EFFECTIVE LIVING 



00143 ATHT-0443-01 



00823 HLTH-0310-10 



TBA 



TBA 



MC 155 



HAYES D 



EFFECTIVE LIVING 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-10 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Wednesday, June 2, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



NEAL S 



00824 HLTH-0310-11 



TBA 



TBA 



EFFECTIVE LIVING 



NOTE: HLTH 0310-11 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Thursday, June 3, in Room 105 in Murphy Center from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



NANCE A 



00825 HLTH-0310-12 2 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: HLTH 0310-12 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



:lecreation - Undergraduate 

j'LD STUD PARKS & REC 

^iternship in ther rec 
Internship outdoor rec 
Nternship in recreation 

»afety - Undergraduate 

RIN ACCIDENT CONTRL 
UTO TRANS SAFT PROG 
(RIVER & TRAFFIC SAF 
CH driver TRAFF SAF 

lealth - Graduate 



01510 


REC-0356-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01553 


REC-490A-02 


9 


TBA 


TBA 


01555 


REC-490B-02 


9 


TBA 


TBA 


01557 


REC-490C-02 


9 


TBA 


TBA 



01626 SAFE-0432-01 3 TBA TBA 

01627 SAFE-0435-01 3 TBA TBA 

01628 SAFE-0485-01 3 TBA TBA 

01629 SAFE-0487-01 3 TBA TBA 



hysical Education - Graduate 



ES methods hper 

HESIS research 
HESIS RESEARCH 
HESIS RESEARCH 
HESIS RESEARCH 
HESIS RESEARCH 
HESIS RESEARCH 



02362 
01259 
01260 
01261 
01262 
01263 
01264 



PHED-0661-01 
PHED-0664-01 
PHED-0664-02 
PHED-0664-03 
PHED-0664-04 
PHED-0664-05 
PHED-0664-06 



MW 0330PM 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



MC 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



104 



WHALEY M 



MC 125 CUNNINGHAM P 

MC 119 SHELARV 

AMG 207 LALANCE R 

MC 119 SHELARV 



MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 



ES METHODS HPERS 


02361 


HLTH-0661-01 


3 


MW 


0330PM 


0540PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00850 


HLTH-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00851 


HLTH-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00852 


HLTH-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00853 


HLTH-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00854 


HLTH-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


HESIS RESEARCH 


00855 


HLTH-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


ATA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 


02316 


HLTH-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


JDEP STUDY HPER 


00864 


HLTH-0691-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


JDEP STUDY HPER 


00865 


HLTH-0691-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


JDEP STUDY HPER 


00866 


HLTH-0691-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



ROWE D 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 



65 



TITLE 

DATA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
FIELD WORK & LAB EXP 
PRE-DISS SEM 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH 



CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 




TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


02364 


PHED-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


01276 


PHED-0691-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 






MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01277 


PHED-0691-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 






MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01278 


PHED-0691-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


01287 


PHED-0706-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


02318 


PHED-0763-01 


2 


T 


0310PM 


0610PM 


MC 


102 


O'HARA-MURDOCK 


01298 


PHED-0764-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




WHALEY M 


01299 


PHED-0764-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




WHALEY M 


01300 


PHED-0764-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




WHALEY M 


01301 


PHED-0764-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




STAFF 


01302 


PHED-0764-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




STAFF 


01303 


PHED-0764-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 




STAFF 



Recreation - Graduate 

FLD STUD PARKS & REC 
RES METHODS HPER 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
THESIS RESEARCH 
DATA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 

Safety - Graduate 

PRIN ACCIDENT CONTRL 
AUTO TRANS SAFT PROG 
DRIVER & TRAFFIC SAF 
TCH DRIVER TRAFF SAF 



01528 


REC-0556-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


02363 


REC-0661-01 


3 


MW 


0330PM 


01533 


REC-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


01534 


REC-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


01535 


REC-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01536 


REC-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


01537 


REC-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


01538 


REC-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


02319 


REC-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


01546 


REC-0691-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


01547 


REC-0691-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


01548 


REC-0691-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



01630 SAFE-0532-01 3 

01631 SAFE-0535-01 3 

01632 SAFE-0585-01 3 

01633 SAFE-0587-01 3 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Athletic Coaching - Undergraduate 



0540PM 



0810PM 



ADM H S COLLEGI ATHL 



00138 ATHC-0480-02 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



MC 

MC 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

MC 

MC 

MC 

MC 



125 
104 



104 
111 
111 
111 



CUNNINGHAM P 
ROWE D 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
ROWED 
WHALEY M 
WHALEY M 
WHALEY M 



MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 

MC G032 DEPRIEST G 



MC 104 



SCARLETT J 



Athletic Training - Undergraduate 



INTRO TO ATHLETIC TRAIN 



00141 ATHT-0258-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM AMG 219 



WHITEHILL W 



Health - Undergraduate 



EFFECTIVE LIVING 


02321 


HLTH-0310-13 


2 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0900AM 


MC 


100B 


PAYNE C 


PERSONAL HEALTH 


02322 


HLTH-0311-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


102 


BARTLEY D 


THE SCH HEALTH PROG 


02323 


HLTH-0430-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


103 


WILCOX S 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


00845 


HLTH-0492-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


00846 


HLTH-0492-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


00847 


HLTH-0492-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



66 



TITLE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

Physical Education - Undergraduate 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



TENNIS (BEGINNERS) 01197 PHED-0104-04 1 MTWR 1010AM 1140AM MC AR-N STAFF 

BOWLING 01201 PHED-0108-03 1 MTW 1250PM 0240PM MC AR-B GUINN M 

NOTE: PHED 0108-03 has a fee of $30 required by second class meeting which includes thirty games, shoes, and practice. 

Classes meet at Bowling Lanes on second class meeting. 
BOWLING 02324 PHED-01 08-04 1 MTW 0250PM 0440PM MC AR-B GUINN M 

NOTE: PHED 0108-04 has a fee of $30 required by second class meeting which includes thirty games, shoes, and practice. 

Classes meet at Bowling Lanes on second class meeting. 
BEG AEROBICS 01205 PHED-0118-04 1 MTWR 0730AM 0900AM MC AR-A BARTLEY D 

SELF DEFENSE 02325 PHED-0125-01 1 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM MC DS-A PAYNE M 

GOLF 01212 PHED-0202-05 1 MTWR 0730AM 0900AM AMG ARENA STAFF 

NOTE: All PHED 0202 classes have a fee of approximately $30 which includes green fees, range balls, and practice facilities. 
SCUBA DIVING 01219 PHED-0212-03 2 MTWR 0330PM 0500PM POOL 100 NUNLEY J 

NOTE: All PHED 0212 classes must provide own masks, snorkels, Ons, and boots - approximately $75. 

Swimsuits are required the first day of class for testing. 
3A-GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 
3A-GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 
3-T TCH STUNTS/TUMB 
5-T TCH AQUATICS 
:;URRICULUM IN P E 
pURRICULUM IN P E 
I^HYS OF EXERCISE 
jjPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS 



01224 


PHED-0343-03 


2 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1140AM 


MC GYM2 


GUINN M 


02326 


PHED-0343-04 


2 


MTW 


0400PM 


0550PM 


COLUMBIA 


SCARLETT J 


01226 


PHED-0373-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


AMG 216 


WOODLEE W 


01229 


PHED-0376-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


POOL 100 


COLLIER G 


02327 


PHED-0378-03 


2 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0900AM 


MC 104 


GUINN M 


01232 


PHED-0378-04 


2 


MTW 


0600PM 


0750PM 


COLUMBIA 


SCARLETT J 


01242 


PHED-0483-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


AMG 153 


MICHAEL T 


01250 


PHED-0492-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 111 


WHALEY M 


01251 


PHED-0492-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 111 


WHALEY M 


01252 


PHED-0492-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 111 


WHALEY M 



Recreation - Undergraduate 



SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01522 


REC-0492-07 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01523 


REC-0492-08 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


SPECIAL PROBLEMS 


01524 


REC-0492-09 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



MC 111 WHALEY M 

MC 111 PATTERSON L 

MC 111 DOWNS S 



Uhletic Coaching - Graduate 

kDM H S COLLEGI ATHL 02320 ATHC-0580-02 3 

Athletic Training - Graduate 

REV-CARE ATHL INJUR 00144 ATHT-0561-01 3 



Health • Graduate 

MDEP STUDY HPER 
^JDEP STUDY HPER 
>JDEP STUDY HPER 



00867 HLTH-0691-10 1 

00868 HLTH-0691-11 2 

00869 HLTH-0691-12 3 



Physical Education -Graduate 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 



MC 104 



AMG 217 



SCARLETT J 



WHITEHILL W 



MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



4DEP STUDY HPER 


01279 


PHED-0691-10 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


IDEP STUDY HPER 


01280 


PHED-0691-11 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


JDEP STUDY HPER 


01281 


PHED-0691-12 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


lELD WORK & LAB EXP 


01288 


PHED-0706-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


ROF PREP IN HP 


02328 


PHED-0708-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


MC 


103 


BARTLEY D 


lOTOR LEARNING IN PE 


02329 


PHED-0709-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


MC 


102 


MICHAEL T 


CH PRAC HP 


02425 


PHED-0760-01 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


114 


WILCOX S 


OH PRAC HP 


01296 


PHED-0761-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


114 


WILCOX S 



67 



TITLE 

Recreation - Graduate 

ISSU TREND RES REC 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 
INDEP STUDY HPER 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



02331 REC-0657-01 

01549 REC-0691-10 

01550 REC-0691-11 

01551 REC-0691-12 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


MC 


105 


CUNNINGHAM 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




MC 


111 


WHALEY M 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

Recreation - Undergraduate 

FLD STUD PARKS & REC 



Recreation - Graduate 

FLD STUD PARKS & REC 



02332 REC-0356-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: REC 0356-02 meets May 11-}une 30 inclusive. 



02333 REC-0556-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: REC 0556-02 meets May 11-June 30 inclusive. 



Session VIII Classes: May 11 ■ August 7 

Physical Education - Undergraduate 

INTERN IN ES AND HPROM , 02334 PHED-0425-01 12 TBA TBA 



Physical Education - Graduate 



INT/SP PROJ IN ES/HPROM 
INT/SP PROJ IN ES/HPROM 



02335 PHED-0688-01 3 

02336 PHED-0688-02 6 



TBA 
TBA 



TBA 
TBA 



MC 125 



MC 125 



AMG 150 



AMG 150 
AMG 150 



GINANNI M 



GINANNI M 



MICHAEL T 



MICHAEL T 
MICHAEL T 



History 



Dr. Thaddeus Smith, Peck Hall 223, 898-2536 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00771 


HIST-0399-01 


00775 


HIST-0494-01 


00780 


HIST-0594-01 


00781 


HIST-0605-01 


00782 


HIST-0606-01 


02135 


HIST-0652-01 


02136 


HIST-0752-01 











Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

History - Undergraduate 



WESTERN CIVILIZ 
WORLD CIV TO 1500 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
AMERICAN PEOPLE 
CONTROV IN AMER HIST 

TENNESSEE 

PROB: EUROPEAN HIST 



00738 


HIST-01 72-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


1030AM 


PH 


220 


RUPPRECHT N 


00740 


HIST-0191-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


214 


CHAOY 


00741 


HIST-0201-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


1030AM 


PH 


201 


NEALJ 


00742 


HIST-0201-02 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


200 


ROWE D 


00743 


HIST-0201-03 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


321 


STAHL J 


00753 


HIST-0202-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


1030AM 


PH 


213 


TAYLOR R 


00754 


HIST-0202-02 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


215 


LEONE J 


00755 


HIST-0202-03 


3 


MTWR 0500PM 


0900PM 


PH 


215 


STAFF 


02141 


HIST-0312-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


1030AM 


PH 


222 


SMITH T 


NOTE: HIST 0312-01 topic 


is "The Civil Rights Movement." 








00765 


HIST-0366-01 


3 


MTWRF 0730AM 


1030AM 


PH 


219 


HOFFSCHWELLE 


02116 


HIST-0489-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


207 


RENNW 


NOTE. 


HIST 0489-01 topic is 


"Nazi Germany and the Holocaust." 









68 



TITLE 

History- Graduate 

PROB: EUROPEAN HIST 

Session II Classes: 

^History - Undergraduate 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



02117 HIST-0589-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

NOTE: HIST 0589-01 topic is "Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. 



PH 207 



May 31 - July 2 



History - Graduate 

lUHOP ABSOL ENLIGHT 
AEX\CO & CARIBBEAN 



02131 HIST-0503-01 
02134 HIST-0525-01 



MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 
MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



PH 
PH 



214 
213 



Session III Classes: May 31 ■ August 7 

History - Graduate 



Session IV Classes: 

History - Undergraduate 



July 6 ■ August 7 



listory - Graduate 

lANADA 

HE AMERICAN INDIAN 



RENN W 



WESTERN CIVILIZ 


00737 


HIST-0171-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


214 


CRAWFORD F 


WESTERN CIVILIZ 


00739 


HIST-01 72-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


200 


RENN W 


WESTERN CIVILIZ 


02128 


HIST-0 172-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


200 


RENNW 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00744 


HIST-0201-04 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


201 


ROWE D 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00745 


HIST-0201-05 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


218 


LEONE J 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00746 


HIST-0201-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


220 


MCWATTERS D 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00747 


HIST-0201-07 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


220 


MCWATTERS D 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00756 


HIST-0202-04 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


207 


BROOKSHIRE J 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00757 


HIST-0202-05 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


220 


TAYLOR R 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00758 


HIST-0202-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


201 


STAFF 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00759 


HIST-0202-07 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


207 


BROOKSHIRE J 


EUROP ABSOL ENLIGHT 


02130 


HIST-0303-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


214 


CRAWFORD F 


■ENNESSEE 


00766 


HIST-0366-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


219 


LESTER C 


■ENNESSEE 


00767 


HIST-0366-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


219 


LESTER C 


"OPICS SOUTHERN STUDIES 


02132 


HIST-0380-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


215 


HUNTR 




NOTE 


HIST 0380-01 topicis 


"Southern History Through Film." 








i^EXICO & CARIBBEAN 


02133 


HIST-0425-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


213 


NEALJ 



02140 
02138 



HIST-0546-01 
HIST-0549-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 



PH 
PH 



219 
219 



CRAWFORD F 
NEALJ 



>EM:JACKSONIAN AM 


02135 


HIST-0652-01 


3 


MW 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


222 


ROLATER F 


;em: jacksonian am 


02136 


HIST-0752-01 


3 


MW 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


222 


ROLATER F 



AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00748 


HIST-0201-08 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


220 


HAGGERTY T 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00749 


HIST-0201-09 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


220 


HAGGERTY T 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00760 


HIST-0202-08 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


213 


WILLIAMS J 


iMERICAN PEOPLE 


00761 


HIST-0202-09 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


213 


WILLIAMS J 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00762 


HIST-0202-10 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


200 


SCHERZER K 


iMERICAN PEOPLE 


02129 


HIST-0202-11 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


200 


SCHERZER K 


ENNESSEE 


00768 


HIST-0366-04 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


219 


COLVIN F 


:anada 


02139 


HIST-0446-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


219 


COLVIN F 


HE AMERICAN INDIAN 


02137 


HIST-0449-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


219 


ROLATER F 



COLVIN F 
ROLATER F 



69 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

History • Undergraduate 



STUDY ABROAD IN AFRICA 



00771 HIST-0399-01 6 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: HIST 0399-01 will be taught in Africa; permission required to enroll. 



BAKARI A 



Session VIII Classes: May 11 - August 7 

History - Undergraduate 

PRESERVATION INTERN 

History - Graduate 



PRESERVATION INTERN 
PUB HIST INTERN 
PUBLIC HIST PRAC 



00775 HIST-0494-01 



TBA TBA 



00780 HIST-0594-01 3 TBA TBA 

00781 HIST-0605-01 3 TBA TBA 

00782 HIST-0606-01 3 TBA TBA 



TBA 


GULLIFORD A 


TBA 


GULLIFORD A 


TBA 


GULLIFORD A 


TBA 


GULLIFORD A 



Human Sciences 

Dr. Karia Hughes, Human Sciences 100, 898-2884 

NOTE: Cooperative Education courses offered for Pass/Fail only 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00608 


FCSE-0457-01 


00609 


FCSE-0557-01 


00610 


FCSE-450A-01 


00611 


FCSE-450B-01 


00612 


FCSE-550A-01 


00613 


FCSE-550B-01 


00723 


H SC-404A-01 


00725 


H SC-404C-01 


00727 


H SC-405A-01 


00729 


H SC-405B-01 


02403 


H SC-405D-01 


00730 


H SC-410A-01 


00731 


H SC-410B-01 


00732 


HSC-410C-01 


00733 


HSC-410D-01 


00735 


H SC-504C-01 


00736 


H SC-505A-01 


02210 


H SC-505B-01 


02404 


H SC-505D-01 


00872 


IDES-0293-01 


00873 


IDES-0294-01 


00876 


IDES-0397-01 


00877 


IDES-0398-01 


01149 


N FS-0429-01 


01151 


N FS-0529-01 


01967 


TXMD-0293-01 


01968 


TXMD-0294-01 


01969 


TXMD-0397-01 


01970 


TXMD-0398-01 







Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Child Development and Family Studies - Undergraduate 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT III 
DAY CARE PERSPECTIVES 



02206 
00233 



CDFS-0431-01 
CDFS-0436-01 



MTWRF 0900AM 
MTWRF 0900AM 



1200PM 
1200PM 



EHS 
EHS 



109 
112 



STOGNER C 
HULLT 



Human Sciences - Undergraduate 

00723 HSC-404A-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

00725 HSC-404C-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

NOTE: H SC 404C-01 is the "New York City Study Tour." 



SEM H SC HUM DEV FAM 
SEM H SC CL-TEXTILE 



EHSA 223 
EHS 110 



EMERY B 
ROBINSON T 



Interior Design - Undergraduate 

INT DESIGN VIA PRES III 02207 IDES-0376-01 

Nutrition and Food Science - Undergraduate 



PRINC OF NUTRITION 
CHILD NUTRITION 



01145 N FS-0124-01 
01148 N FS-0425-01 



MTWRF 0800AM 0130PM EHS 201 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM EHS 106 

MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM EHS 200 



COLEMAN S 



MCNAUGHTON J 
COLSON J 



Child Development and Family Studies • Graduate 

DAY CARE PERSPECT 00235 CDFS-0536-01 3 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



EHS 112 



HULLT 



70 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Human Sciences - Graduate 

SEM H SC HUM DEV FAM 
SEM H SC CL - TEXTILE 



00734 H SC-504A-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

00735 H SC-504C-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 
NOTE: H SC 504C-01 is the "New York City Study Tour." 



Nutrition and Food Science - Graduate 

SHILD NUTRITION 01150 N FS-0525-01 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



EHSA 223 EMERY B 

EHS 110 ROBINSON T 



EHS 200 COLSON J 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Child Development and Family Studies - Undergraduate 



HUMAN DEVELOP I 
3YNAMICS INTERPER RELAT 
sFF INSTR (BIRTH-5) 



00230 CDFS-0235-01 
00232 CDFS-0333-01 
00234 CDFS-0437-01 



3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


EHS 


109 


MOORE M 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


EHS 


200 


EMERY B 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


EHS 


112 


STAFF 



-iuman Sciences - Undergraduate 

\DV PBLM HOUSING - DES 02403 H SC-405D-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: H SC 405D-0 1 topic is "European Study Tour. " 

nterior Design - Undergraduate 

NT DESIGN VIS PRES I 02209 IDES-0370-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 0200PM 



>lutrition and Food Science • Undergraduate 

)IETETIC PRACTICUM 01149 N FS-0429-01 6 

rhild Development and Family Studies - Graduate 

FF INSTR (BIRTH - 5) 00236 CDFS-0537-01 3 



MTWRF 0730AM 0330PM 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



Iuman Sciences - Graduate 

DV PBLM HOUSING - DES 02404 H SC-505D-01 3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

NOTE: H SC 505D-01 topic is "European Study Tour." 

Nutrition and Food Science • Graduate 

lETETIC PRACTICUM 01151 N FS-0529-01 6 MTWRF 0730AM 0330PM 

Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

amily and Consumer Sciences Education • Undergraduate 

ARE & GUID CHILD 00610 FCSE-450A-01 3 TBA TBA 

OOD MGMT/PROD & SERV 00611 FCSE-450B-01 3 TBA TBA 

CCUPATIONAL H E SEM 00608 FCSE-0457-01 3 TBA TBA 

Iuman Sciences • Undergraduate 

BV PBLM HUM DEV FAM 00727 H SC-405A-01 3 TBA TBA 

DV PBLM FOODS - NUT 00729 H SC-405B-01 3 TBA TBA 

ITERSHIP:HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 00730 H SC-410A-01 6 TBA TBA 

ITERSHIP:CONSUMER SERVICES 00731 H SC-410B-01 6 TBA TBA 

ITERSHIPrFASHION MERCH 00732 H SC-410C-01 6 TBA TBA 

ITERSHIPilNTERIOR DESIGN 00733 H SC-410D-01 6 TBA TBA 



EHS 106 COLEMAN S 



EHSA 221 BELCHER D 



EHS 110 SHEEHAN-SMrm L 



EHS 112 STAFF 



EHS 106 COLEMAN S 



EHS 110 SHEEHAN-SMITH L 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


EMERY B 


TBA 


COLSON J 


TBA 


EMERY B 


TBA 


SHEEHAN-SMITH L 


TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 



71 



TITLE CALL NO. 

Interior Design - Undergraduate 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00872 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00873 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00876 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 00877 



COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



IDES-0293-01 
IDES-0294-01 
IDES-0397-01 
IDES-0398-01 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 


TBA 


COLEMAN S 



Nutrition and Food Science - Undergraduate 

PRINC OF NUTRITION 01147 N FS-01 24-02 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTf; N FS 0124-02 is a DisUnce Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
PRINC OF NUTRITION 02211 N FS-01 24-03 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: N FS 0124-03 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientaUon on Wednesday, June 2, in Room 103A in Peck Hall from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



COLSON J 



COLSON J 



Textiles, Merchandising, and Design ■ Undergraduate 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 01967 TXMD-0293-01 3 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 01968 TXMD-0294-01 3 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 01969 TXMD-0397-01 3 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 01970 TXMD-0398-01 3 

Family and Consumer Sciences Education - Graduate 

CARE & QUID OF CHILD 00612 FCSE-550A-01 3 

FOOD MGMT/PROD & SERV 00613 FCSE-550B-01 3 

OCCUPATIONAL H EC SEM 00609 FCSE-0557-01 3 

Human Sciences - Graduate 

ADV PBLM HUM DEV FAM 00736 H SC-505A-01 3 

ADV PBLM FOODS NUT 02210 H SC-505B-01 3 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


KELLEY N 


TBA 


-KELLEY N 


TBA 


KELLEY N 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



TBA 
TBA 



TBA 
TBA 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Child Development and Family Studies ■ Undergraduate 

FAMILY RELATIONS 00231 CDFS-0332-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

Human Sciences - Undergraduate 

BASIC DESIGN I 
SENIOR SEMINAR 



TBA 
TBA 



EHS 106 



EMERY B 
WALKER D 



STOGNER C 



00712 


HSC-0161-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


0100PM 


EHS 


112 


KEELING D 


00713 


H SC-0400-01 


1 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0140PM 


EHS 


109 


PURYEAR C 



Human Sciences - Graduate 

PUB POL CONS FAM ISSUES 02347 H SC-0652-01 



TWR 0400PM 0700PM 



EHS 109 



STAFF 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W- Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - TuesdayH-hursday 
Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered 0500 and above are open only to graduate students. 



72 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Journalism 

Dr. Richard Campbell, Mass Communication 249, 898-2814 

NOTE: Students who fail to attend the first class meeting without prior arrangements 
with the instructor will lose their places in class and those spaces will be made available to other students. 

The following courses are cross-listed between the Departments of Journalism and Radio-TV/Photography: 

151, 300, 321, 420, 421, 461, 466, 479, 480, and 485. Students may take these courses in either 

Journalism or Radio-TV/Photography to fulfill University, College, or Department requirements. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00921 


JOUR-0358-01 


00922 


JOUR-0358-02 


00923 


JOUR-0358-03 


00924 


JOUR-0400-01 


00925 


JOUR-0400-02 


00926 


JOUR-0400-03 


00929 


JOUR-0490-01 


00930 


JOUR-0490-02 


00931 


JOUR-0490-03 



session I Classes: May 11-28 

kdvertising - Undergraduate 



URVEY OF ADV 



00070 ADV-0242-01 



jfaphic Communication - Undergraduate 

ASIC MEDIA DESIGN 02255 GRAF-0391-01 3 



9urnalism - Undergraduate 

JTRO TO MASS COMM 
EDIA WRITING 
EDIA WRITING 



00915 JOUR-0151-01 3 
00918 JOUR-0171-01 3 
00917 JOUR-0171-02 3 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 
MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 
MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 



ubiic Relations - Undergraduate 

UBRELCOMM 01160 P R-0336-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

lession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

dvertising - Undergraduate 

DV MEDIA PLAN 



ITRO TO GRAPHIC COMM 



COMM 151 



COMM 112 



COMM 104 
COMM 269 
COMM 271 



COMM 228 



lurnalism - Undergraduate 

EDIA WRITING 

1EE EXPRESS, MASS MEDIA 

^SS MEDIA LAW 



ession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

lurnalism - Undergraduate 

TRO TO MASS COMM 
EDIA WRITING 
ilACTICUM 
jUCTICUM 
1ACTICUM 



PARENTE D 



WONG R 



BURRISSL 
QUARLES J 
BODLE J 



HAUGLAND A 



00072 


ADV-0348-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM 228 


BODLE J 


nderg 

00710 


raduate 

GRAF-0295-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM 151 


MCCOMB D 


00919 


JOUR-0171-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM 271 


KIMBRELL E 


02253 


JOUR-0360-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM 104 


BURRISS L 


00927 


JOUR-0420-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM 104 


KIMBRELL E 



00916 


JOUR-0151-02 


3 


TR 


1250PM 


0245PM 


COMM 151 


CAMPBELL R 


02256 


JOUR-0171-04 


3 


MW 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM 270 


BADGER D 


00921 


JOUR-0358-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


00922 


JOUR-0358-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 


00923 


JOUR-0358-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


STAFF 



73 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



00924 


JOUR-0400-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


00925 


JOUR-0400-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


00926 


JOUR-0400-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



INTERNSHIP 
INTERNSHIP 
INTERNSHIP 



Session IV Classes: July 6 ■ August 7 

Journalism - Undergraduate 

INTRO TO MASS COMM 02286 JOUR-0151-03 3 

INTRO TO MOTION PICTURES 00920 JOUR-0300-01 3 

MASS MEDIA LAW 00928 JOUR-0420-02 3 

INDIV PROBS IN M 00929 JOUR-0490-01 1 

INDIV PROBS IN M C 00930 JOUR-0490-02 2 

INDIV PROBS IN M 00931 JOUR-0490-03 3 

Public Relations - Undergraduate 

PR PRINCIPLES 01159 P R-0240-01 3 



MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 



1010AM 

1250PM 

1010AM 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 



1230PM 
0310PM 
1230PM 



COMM 266 HIMEBAUGHG 

COMM 266 HIMEBAUGHG 

COMM 266 HIMEBAUGH G 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



COMM 150 
COMM 103 
COMM 103 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



COMM 151 



HICKS C 
SPIRES R 
O NEAL D 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 



NAGY A 



Management and Marketing 

Dr. Jill Austin, Business and Aerospace N121A, 898-2736 

NOTE: Freshman and sophomore students should not enroll in 300- or 400-level Management and Marketing courses 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01050 


MGMT-0397-01 


01051 


MGMT-0398-01 


01057 


MGMT-0495-01 


01060 


MGMT-0499-01 


02176 


MGMT-0679-01 


01083 


MKT-0397-01 


01084 


MKT-0398-01 


01090 


MKT-0499-01 


02018 


MKT-0689-01 



Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Management - Undergraduate 



PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 01034 


MGMT-0361-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S276 


THOMAS J 


HUMAN RES MGMT 02186 


MGMT-0381-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S262 


SINGER M 


Marketing - Undergraduate 


















PRIN OF MARKETING 01070 


MKT-0382-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S277 


KEMPK 


RETAILING 01076 


MKT-0383-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BAS 


S332 


MOSER H 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Business Administration - Undergraduate 



BUSINESS POLICY 


00145. 


B AD-0498-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S276 


TILLERY K 


BUSINESS POLICY 


00146 


B AD-0498-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S332 


SOKOYA 8 


Management - Undergraduate 


















PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


01035 


MGMT-0361-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S126 


STAFF 


PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


01036 


MGMT-0361-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S278 


THOMAS E 


PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


02205 


MGMT-0361-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S264 


TANGT 


PROD & OPERATION SYS 


01040 


MGMT-0362-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S277 


PETERS M 


PROD & OPERATION SYS 


01041 


MGMT-0362-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S277 


PETERS M 


PROD & OPERATION SYS 


01042 


MGMT-0362-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S276 


BULLINGTON K 


MATERIALS MGMT SYSTE 


02242 


MGMT-0375-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S276 


BULLINGTON K 



74 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TITLE 

lUMANRESMGMT 01048 MGMT-0381-02 3 

MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING 02154 MGMT-0389-01 3 

NJTL HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT 02394 MGMT-0462-01 3 

)RGANIZATION BEH DEV 01055 MGMT-0468-01 3 

MTERNATIONAL BUS 01056 MGMT-0471-01 3 

ilarketing - Undergraduate 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



MTWR 

MTWR 

TR 

MTWR 

MTWR 



1250PM 
0730AM 
0600PM 
1010AM 
1010AM 



0310PM 
0950AM 
1020PM 
1230PM 
1230PM 



BAS 8277 

BAS 8274 

BAS S277 

BAS 8264 

BAS S276 



GILBERT J 
THOMAS E 
GILBERT J 
TANGT 
TILLERY K 



'RIN OF MARKETING 


01071 


MKT-0382-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S332 


FESTERVAND T 


RIN OF MARKETING 


02157 


MKT-0382-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S332 


FESTERVAND T 


ERSONAL SELLING 


02244 


MKT-0384-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


8264 


KEMPK 


ROMOTION 


02246 


MKT-0385-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


SI 26 


PHILLIPS M 


IKT RESEARCH 


01081 


MKT-0393-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


8302 


GRAEFF T 


JTERNATIONAL BUS 


01086 


MKT-0471-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


8276 


TILLERY K 


PPLIED MKT RESEARCH 


01088 


MKT-0488-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


8302 


GRAEFF T 


lARKETING MGMT 


01089 


MKT-0489-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


8274 


WARREN W 



TR 



MW 



01050 
01051 
01057 
01060 



MGMT-0397-01 
MGMT-0398-01 
MGMT-0495-01 
MGMT-0499-01 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



usiness Administration - Graduate 

USINESS POLICY 00151 B AD-0698-01 3 

Management - Graduate 

JS ETHICS 02156 MGMT-0675-01 3 

iession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

lanagement - Undergraduate 

OOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
DOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
GMT INTERNSHIP 
DEPENDENT STUDY 

larketing - Undergraduate 

DOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
DOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
DEPENDENT STUDY 



anagement - Graduate 

^OB IN MGMT 02176 MGMT-0679-01 3 TBA TBA 

arketing - Graduate 

«OBINMKT 02018 MKT-0689-01 3 TBA TBA 

ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

jsiness Administration - Undergraduate 

ISINESS POLICY 00148 B AD-0498-03 

ISINESS POLICY 00149 B AD-0498-04 

ISINESS POLICY 00150 B AD-0498-05 



0600PM 1020PM 



0600PM 1020PM 



01083 


MKT-0397-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01084 


MKT-0398-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


01090 


MKT-0499-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 



BAS 8276 80K0YA 8 



BAS 8264 AUSTIN J 



BAS N116 PETERS M 

BAS Nil 6 PETERS M 
TBA STAFF 

TBA STAFF 



BAS N114 M08ER H 
BAS N116 M08ER H 
TBA STAFF 



TBA 



TBA 



STAFF 



STAFF 



BAS S276 MULLANE J 
BAS 8262 MPOYI R 
BAS S264 HART W 



75 



TITLE CALL NO. 

Management - Undergraduate 



COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


01037 


MGMT-0361-05 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S276 


THOMAS J 


PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


01038 


MGMT-0361-06 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S276 


HART W 


PRIN MGMT & ORG BEH 


01039 


MGMT-0361-07 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S276 


JACOBS G 


PROD & OPERATION SYS 


01043 


MGMT-0362-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S332 


KETHLEY B 


ORGANIZATION THEORY 


01045 


MGMT-0363-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S262 


JACOBS G 


INTRO TO MGMT SCI 


02247 


MGMT-0364-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S306 


KETHLEY R 


INTERNATIONAL BUS 


02165 


MGMT-0471-02 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S262 


MPOYI R 



Marketing - Undergraduate 



PRIN OF MARKETING 


01074 


MKT-0382-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S277 


MAYOD 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


01075 


MKT-0382-05 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S332 


HILLC 


\07r; 


MKT 0382 sections 6, 7, 8 and 9 are 


Distance 


Learning 


courses taught through compressed video. 






For 


more details, refer to the Distance Learning on 


page 97. 








PRIN OF MARKETING 


02167 


MKT-0382-06 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S273 


STAFF 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


02168 


MKT-0382-07 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


COLUMBIA 


STAFF 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


02170 


MKT-0382-08 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


LAWRENCBRG 


STAFF 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


02171 


MKT-0382-09 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


TULLAHOMA 


STAFF 


PERSONAL SELLING 


01078 


MKT-0384-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S277 


INKSS 


CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 


02172 


MKT-0391-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S332 


HILLC 


MKT CHANNELS MGMT 


02173 


MKT-0396-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BAS 


S277 


MAYOD 


INTERNATIONAL BUS 


02174 


MKT-0471-02 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S262 


MPOYI R 


SALES MANAGEMENT 


01087 


MKT-0480-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S264 


INKSS 



Business Administration - Graduate 

BUSINESS POLICY 00152 B AD-0698-02 



Management - Graduate 



OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 



02166 MGMT-0665-01 3 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 



Management - Graduate 



STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONS 



01063 MGMT-0660-01 



TR 



TR 



0600PM 1020PM 



BAS S276 MULLANE J 



0600PM 1020PM BAS S277 STAFF 



0600PM 0840PM BAS S264 SINGER M 



Marl<eting- Graduate 



MARKETING MANAGEMENT 


01093 


MKT-0680-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS 


S262 


WARREN W 


MARKET BEHAVIOR 


01094 


MKT-0682-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS 


S262 


MOSER R 



Mass Communication, College of 

Dr. Geoff Hull, Director of Graduate Studies, Mass Communication 248, 898-5874 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00949 
00955 



M C-0664-01 
M C-0665-01 



00950 
00956 



M C-0664-02 
M C-0665-02 



00951 
00957 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

College of Mass Communication • Graduate 



SCIENCE OF COMM 


02280 


M C-0600-01 


3 


W 


MEDIA MANAGEMENT 


00946 


M C-0620-01 


3 


T 
76 



0600PM 0950PM 
0600PM 0950PM 



M C-0664-03 
M C-0665-03 



COMM 151 WYATT R 

COMM 150 POOD E 



riTLE 

STUDIES IN MUSIC 
3IR READING 
rHESIS RESEARCH 
FHESIS RESEARCH 
rHESIS RESEARCH 
'RO PROJECT 
»R0 PROJECT 
'RO PROJECT 



ALL NO 


. COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 




TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


02402 


M C-0635-01 


3 


M 


0600PM 


0950PM 


COMM151 


EASON D 


00948 


MC-0661-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00949 


M C-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00950 


M C-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00951 


M C-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00955 


M C-0665-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00956 


M C-0665-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 


00957 


M C-0665-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 






TBA 


HULLG 



Mathematical Sciences 

Dr. Jeff Allbritten, Kirksey Old Main 223D, 898-2669 

NOTE: Cooperative Education Courses offered for Pass/Fail only. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



02270 
02272 



MATH-0293-01 
MATH-0398-01 



02273 MATH-0294-01 



02271 MATH-0397-01 



>ession I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

/tathematics - Undergraduate 



lATH FOR ELEM TEACHERS 


00975 


MATH-01 10-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0830AM 


1130AM 


KOM 


200 


MILLER L 


OLLEGE ALGEBRA 


00979 


MATH-0141-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0830AM 


1130AM 


KOM 


225 


NELSON D 


lATH/GEN STU 


00994 


MATH-0300-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0830AM 


1130AM 


KOM 


224 


ZHAX 



NOrt; MATH 0401 sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 are Distance Learning courses taught through compressed video. 
I For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

llATH FOR MID SCH TEACH 01002 MATH-0401-01 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM 

lATH FOR MID SCH TEACH 01003 MATH-0401-02 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM 

lATH FOR MID SCH TEACH 01004 MATH-0401-03 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM 

lATH FOR MID SCH TEACH 01005 MATH-0401-04 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM 



KOM 122 ASPINWALL L 

COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 

LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 



tatistics - Undergraduate 

PPLIED STAT 

tatistics • Graduate 

=PL STAT 



01959 STAT-0313-01 



01963 STAT-0513-01 



ession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

ctuarial Science - Undergraduate 

T & LIFE CONTNG 02226 ACSI-0450-01 

lathematics - Undergraduate 



MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM KOM 222 



MTWRF 0830AM 1130AM KOM 222 



MTWR 0600PM 0820PM KOM 221 



CHURCH C 



CHURCH C 



BARNWAL R 



^TH FOR ELEM TEACHERS 


02076 


MATH-01 10-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


200 


HARGIS B 


.GEBRA & TRIG 


00977 


MATH-01 2 1-01 


4 


MTWR 


0730AM 


1000AM 


CKNB 


108 


HART J 


DLLEGE ALGEBRA 


00980 


MATH-0141-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


225 


RAINES J 


DLLEGE ALGEBRA 


00981 


MATH-01 41 -03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


225 


RAINES J 


DLLEGE ALGEBRA 


00982 


MATH-01 41 -04 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


KOM 


225 


STAFF 


.ANE TRIGONOMETRY 


00985 


MATH-01 42-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


205 


HARGIS B 


EOM FOR ELEM TEACHERS 


00987 


MATH-0201-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


202 


BOULDIN E 


\TH-MGRL/SOC/LIFE 


00992 


MATH-0243-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


224 


WORSEY A 


XTH/GEN STU 


00995 


MATH-0300-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


202 


BOULDIN E 



77 



TITLE 


CALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


COLLEGE GEOMETRY 


02287 


MATH-0307-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 200 


TARR J 


ELEMENTS LINEAR ALG 


00997 


MATH-0312-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 205 


NELSON D 


MGMT CALCULUS 1 


00998 


MATH-0344-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 221 


BARNWAL R 


FOUNDATIONS HIGHER MATH 


02224 


MATH-0346-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 222 


LEA J 



Actuarial Science - Graduate 

COMPND INT & LIFE CONTNG 02227 ACSI-0550-01 



MTWR 0600PM 0820PM KOM 221 BARNWAL R 



Mathematics - Graduate 

ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 



02225 
02405 



MATH-0612-01 
MATH-0706-01 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Mathematics - Undergraduate 



ALGEBRA & TRIG 

CALCULUS I 

MATH FOR HEALTH PROF 



CALCULUS II 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



02215 
00978 
02262 



MATH-0121-02 
MATH-01 22-01 
MATH-0209-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 



MTWR 
MTWR 
TBA 



0730AM 
1010AM 



0730AM 
0850AM 
TBA 



0950AM 
1230PM 



0845AM 
1005AM 



KOM 221 
KOM 224 



KOM 222 
KOM 222 
TBA 



NOTE: MATH 0209-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

00991 MATH-0221-01 4 MTWR 1130AM 1245PM 

02270 MATH-0293-01 3 TBA TBA 
02273 MATH-0294-01 3 TBA TBA 

02271 MATH-0397-01 3 TBA TBA 

02272 MATH-0398-01 3 TBA TBA 



CKNB 108 
KOM 203D 
KOM 203D 
KOM 203D 
KOM 203D 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Mathematics - Undergraduate 



COLLEGE ALGEBRA 
COLLEGE ALGEBRA 
PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 
GEOM FOR ELEM TEACHERS 
MATH-MGRL/SOC/LIFE 
MATH/GEN STU 
MGMT CALCULUS 1 
COMB & GRAPH THEORY 

Statistics ■ Undergraduate 

APPLIED STAT 
PROB AND STAT 

Mathematics - Graduate 

COMB & GRAPH THEORY 

Statistics - Graduate 

APPL STAT 
PROB/STAT 



01960 
01961 



STAT-0313-02 
STAT-03 14-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 



1010AM 
1010AM 



1230PM 
1230PM 



KOM 205 
KOM 224 



02229 MATH-0570-01 



01964 
02275 



STAT-05 13-02 
STAT-05 14-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



KOM 205 
KOM 224 



POWELL J 
JAMISON K 



BALCH J 
LEA J 
RAINES J 



BALCH J 
BALCH J 
BALCH J 
BALCH J 
BALCH J 



00983 


MATH-01 41 -05 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


225 


STAFF 


00984 


MATH-01 41 -06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


225 


STAFF 


00986 


MATH-01 42-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


KOM 


222 


MELNIKOV Y 


00988 


MATH-0201-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


200 


BECKM 


00993 


MATH-0243-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


205 


CAMPBELL D 


00996 


MATH-0300-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


KOM 


221 


ZIJLSTRA J 


00999 


MATH-0344-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


221 


HANKINS 


02228 


MATH-0470-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


KOM 


224 


ZIJLSTRA J 



CAMPBELL D 
WALSH D 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM KOM 224 ZIJLSTRA J 



CAMPBELL D 
WALSH D 



78 



riTLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

Mathematics • Graduate 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



NOTE: MATH 0690 secUons 1, 2, 3, and 4 are Distance Learning courses taught through compressed video. 
For wore details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

•JESEARCH IN MATH ED 02407 MATH-0690-01 3 T 0400PM 0750PM 

IIESEARCH IN MATH ED 02408 MATH-0690-02 3 T 0400PM 0750PM 

lESEARCH IN MATH ED 02409 MATH-0690-03 3 T 0400PM 0750PM 

lESEARCH IN MATH ED 02410 MATH-0690-04 3 T 0400PM 0750PM 



KOM 122 ASPINWALL L 

COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 
LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 



Military Science 

Lt. Col. Doug Chaffin, Forrest Hall, 898-2470 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



00961 
00963 
00967 
00970 
00973 



M S-0100-01 
MS-01 00-04 
M S-0102-01 
M S-0201-02 
M S-0300-01 



00962 
00965 
00968 
00971 
00974 



lession I Classes: May 11-28 

liiitary Science • Undergraduate 



IL SCI PRACTICUM 



00961 M S-0100-01 



ession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

liiitary Science - Undergraduate 



L SCI PRACTICUM 
!T YEAR BASIC M S 
T YEAR BASIC M S 
»D YEAR BASIC M S 
ID YEAR BASIC M S 



00962 M S-01 00-02 1 

00965 MS-0101-01 1 

00967 M S-0102-01 1 

00969 MS-0201-01 2 

00971 M S-0202-01 2 



M S-0100-02 
M S-0101-01 
M S-0102-02 
M S-0202-01 
MS-0313-01 



MTWR TBA 



MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 



ession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

ilitary Science - Undergraduate 



L SCI PRACTICUM 
SIC MILITARY SCI 
S FIELD METHODS 



00964 MS-01 00-03 1 MWF TBA 

00973 M S-0300-01 6 TBA TBA 

00974 MS-0313-01 6 TBA TBA 



ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Hilary Science - Undergraduate 



L SCI PRACTICUM 
|T YEAR BASIC M S 
IT YEAR BASIC M S 
D YEAR BASIC M S 
D YEAR BASIC M S 



00963 
00966 

00968 
00970 
00972 



M S-01 00-04 
MS-0101-02 
M S-0102-02 
M S-0201-02 
M S-0202-02 



MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 



00964 
00966 
00969 
00972 



MS-01 00-03 
MS-0101-02 
MS-0201-01 
M S-0202-02 



TBA 



CHAFFIN K 



TBA 




CHAFFIN K 


FH 


204 


OGDEN 


FH 


204 


OGDEN 


FH 


203 


OGDEN 


FH 


203 


OGDEN 



TBA 


OGDEN 


TBA 


CHAFFIN K 


TBA 


CHAFFIN K 



TBA 




CHAFFIN K 


FH 


204 


OGDEN 


FH 


204 


OGDEN 


FH 


203 


OGDEN 


FH 


203 


OGDEN 



79 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Music 



Dr. Roger Kugler, Wright Music Building 150, 898-2469 

NOTE: Students who fail to attend the first class meeting of MUSI 419/519, 429/529, or 459/559 without prior 
arrangement with the instructor will lose their places in class and those spaces will be made available to other student 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01101 


MUSI-0236-01 


01104 


MUSI-0302-01 


01106 


MUSI-0321-01 


01107 


MUSI-0321-02 


02343 


MUSI-0419-01 


02344 


MUSI-0419-02 


01108 


MUSI-0427-01 


01109 


MUSI-0427-02 


01111 


MUSI-0436-01 


01114 


MUSI-0501-01 


01115 


MUSl-0519-01 


01133 


MUSI-0671-01 


01134 


MUSI-0671-02 


01135 


MUSI-0671-03 


01137 


MUSI-403B-01 


01138 


MUSI-403C-01 


01140 


MUSI-403Q-01 


01142 


MUSI-503B-01 


01143 


MUSI-503C-01 


01144 


MUSI-503Q-01 







Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Music • Undergraduate 



THE SS DICT 
FUNDAMENTALS OF MUS 
MUSIC HISTORY II 
MUS ELEM GRADES 
PRIN PRACT OF ELEC MUS 

Music - Graduate 

PRIN ELEC MUS 



01095 MUSI-0112-01 

01096 MUSI-0121-01 
01098 MUSI-0162-01 
01106 MUSI-0321-01 
02343 MUSI-0419-01 



01115 MUSl-0519-01 



4 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1200PM 


SFA 


205 


LINTON M 


3 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1250PM 


SFA 


212 


BILLS R 


2 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


1150AM 


SFA 


211 


SHEARON S 


3 


MTWRF 


1010AM 


0100PM 


SFA 


207 


BOONE N 


3 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


0100PM 


COMM180 


WOOD R 



MTWRF 1000AM 0100PM 



COMM180 



Session 11 Classes: May 31 ■ July 2 

Music - Undergraduate 



INTRODTO MUSIC 

MUS ELEM GRADES 

PRIN PRACT OF ELEC MUS 

Music - Graduate 

ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUE 



01121 MUSI-0605-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



SFA 211 



Session 111 Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Music - Undergraduate 



MUSIC INTERNSHIP 
MUSIC INTERNSHIP 
PRI INSTR-ORGAN 

Music - Graduate 

THEORY SURVEY 
PROBLEMS IN MUSIC 

MUSIC INTERNSHIP 



NOTE: MUSI 403Q-01 is a workshop meeting June 14-26. Topic is "Orff-Schulwerk Level II." 

01108 MUSI-0427-01 3 TBA TBA WMB 260 

01109 MUSI-0427-02 6 TBA TBA WMB 260 
01111 MUSI-0436-01 1 TBA TBA WMB MH 



01114 MUSI-0501-01 2 TBA TBA SFA 115 

01144 MUSI-503Q-01 2 MTWRF 0900AM 0400PM SFA 203 

NOTE: MUSI 503Q-01 is a workshop meeting June 14-26. Topic is "Orff-Schuhverk Level II." 

01117 MUSI-0527-01 3 TBA TBA WMB 260 



WOOD R 



01105 


MUSI-0310-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


SFA 205 


KUGLER R 


01107 


MUSI-0321-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


SFA 207 


BOONE N 


02344 


MUSI-0419-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM180 


PIEKARSKI J 



BRECHT P 



THE SS DICT 


01099 


MUSI-0211-01 


3 


MTWR 0850AM 


0955AM 


SFA 


211 


BRECHT P 


PRI INSTR-ORGAN 


01101 


MUSI-0236-01 


1 


TBA TBA 




WMB 


MH 


BRECHT P 


PROBLEMS IN MUSIC 


01140 


MUSI-403Q-01 


2 


MTWRF 0900AM 


0400PM 


SFA 


203 


WOODM 



80 



ITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



iUSIC INTERNSHIP 


01118 


MUSI-0527-02 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


IPECIAL STUDIES 


01133 


MUSI-0671-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


FECIAL STUDIES 


01134 


MUSI-0671-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


PECIAL STUDIES 


01135 


MUSI-0671-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


WMB 260 


HUTCHESON L 


TBA 


BOONE N 


TBA 


BOONE N 


TBA 


BOONE N 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

lusic - Undergraduate 



'UNDAMENTALS OF MUS 


02144 


MUSI-0121-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


SFA 


208 


KUGLER R 


OMMER SONGWRITING 


01104 


MUSI-0302-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM149 


MULRAINE L 


JTROD TO MUSIC 


02142 


MUSI-0310-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


SFA 


205 


KUGLER R 


DV CHORAL COND 


01137 


MUSI-403B-01 


2 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


KOM 


452 


BUNDAGE R 










MTWRF 


0130PM 


0430PM 


KOM 


452 




ROBilNSTRUM CONDUCT SYM 


01138 


MUSI-403C-01 


2 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


KOM 


452 


BUNDAGE R 










MTWRF 


0130PM 


0430PM 


KOM 


452 





lusic - Graduate 

DV CHORAL COND 

DV INSTRUMENT COND 



rivate Instruction 

j)ice 
9no 



01142 MUSI-503B-01 2 

01143 MUSI-503C-01 2 



MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM KOM 452 BUNDAGE R 

MTWRF 0130PM 0430PM KOM 452 

MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM KOM 452 BUNDAGE R 

MTWRF 0130PM 0430PM KOM 452 



rgan 
rings 

jitar 

oodwinds 

wer Brass 

jrn 

jmpet 

rcussion 



Dr. Isley-Farmer (V^MB 256); Ms. Foy (SFA 215); Mr. Smith (WMB 260) 

Dr. Perkins (WMB 258); Mr. Bills (SFA 112); Mr. Landry (WMB 259); Dr. Harb (SFA 107); 

Ms. Gustafson (SFA 1 10A); Ms. Jamison (WMB 250); Dr. R Ruocco (SFA 1 10A) 

Dr. Brecht(SFA 105) 

Dr. Harvin (WMB 262); Ms. Emahiser (SFA116); Mr. Applegate (WMB 264); 

Mr. Petrescu (SFA 216) 

Dr. Yelverton (SFA 214), Mr. Thiemann (SFA 214) 

Mr. Pigg (SFA 206); Dr. Hansbrough (SFA 204); Mr. Waldecker (WMB 1 70) 

Mr. Schaefer(WMB 170) 

Mr. Heuer(SFA 116) 

Mr. Foy (SFA 201 ) 

Mr. Davila (WMB 1 56) 



Nursing 



Dr. Karen Ward, Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building 201, 898-2437 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01152 
01155 



NURS-0311-01 
NURS-0331-01 



01153 
01157 



esslon I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

irsing • Undergraduate 

NCEPTS OF NURSE AGENCY 01152 NURS-0311-01 2 



NURS-0313-01 
NURS-0410-01 



01154 
01158 



NURS-0314-01 
NURS-0490-01 



TBA 



KOPPM 



81 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Nursing - Undergraduate 



HEALTH ASSESSMENT 


01153 


NURS-0313-01 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


ASSESSMENT CLINICAL 


01154 


NURS-0314-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


PHARMACOLOGY 


01155 


NURS-0331-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 



TBA 


KOPPM 


TBA 


KOPPM 


TBA 


KOPPM 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Nursing - Undergraduate 

NOTE: NURS 0334 sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 are Distance Learning Telecourses taught through Compressed Video. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


01156 


NURS-0334-01 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


CKNB 106 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02339 


NURS-0334-02 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


COLUMBIA 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02340 


NURS-0334-03 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LAWRENCBRG 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02341 


NURS-0334-04 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


TULLAHOMA 


DRAUDE B 


RESEARCH 


01157 


NURS-0410-01 


3 


W 


0430PM 


0830PM 


CKNB 123 


STAFF 


INDEPENDENT STUDY 


01158 


NURS-0490-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


WAKIM J 



Philosophy 

Dr. Ron Bombardi, James Union Building 300, 898-2907 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

02342 PHIL-480A-01 

Session I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Philosophy - Undergraduate 



INTROD TO PHILOSOPHY 


01304 


PHIL-0201-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


JUB 


304 


PRINCIPE M 


EL LOGIC &CRIT THIN 


01306 


PHIL-0311-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


JUB 


202 


HINZM 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Philosophy - Undergraduate 



INTROD TO PHILOSOPHY 
EL LOGIC &CRIT THIN 
READINGS IN PHIL 

READINGS: STUDIES IN MODERN 



01305 
01307 
02342 



PHIL-0201-02 
PHIL-0311-02 
PHIL-480A-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 



0700PM 
1010AM 
0330PM 



0920PM 
1230PM 
0550PM 



NOTE: PHIL 480A-O1 topic is "The Emergence of Norms." 

02216 PHIL-480U-01 3 TBA TBA 



JUB 
JUB 
JUB 

TBA 



304 
304 
304 



HOODR 
BOMBARDI R 
HOODR 

MAGADA-WARt 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Religious Studies - Undergraduate 



COMPARATIVE RELIGION 01477 R S-0302-01 3 TBA TBA TBA JACKSON M 

NOTE: R S 0302-01 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 
to attend orientation on Wednesday, June 2, in Room 227 in Peck Hall from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



82 



ITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



lession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

hilosophy - Undergraduate 



TROD TO PHILOSOPHY 


02180 


PHIL-0201-03 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


JUB 


304 


JOHNSON C 


t. LOGIC & CRIT THIN 


01308 


PHIL-0311-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JUB 


304 


MAGADA-WARD M 



Physics and Astronomy 

Dr. Robert Carlton, Wiser-Patten Science Building 21 9, 898-2130 



lession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

hysics - Undergraduate 



NOTE: Students enrolling in PHYS 0231 or 0235 (lecture) should enroll in a PHYS 0233 (lab) section. 



OLLEGE PHYSICS 1 


01316 


PHYS-0231-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


WPS 


220 


MOODY T 


OLLEGE PHYSICS 1 


01317 


PHYS-0231-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


220 


CARLTON R 


TRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01319 


PHYS-0233-01 


1 


MTWRF 


0730AM 


0910AM 


WPS 


211 


CARLTON R 


TRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01320 


PHYS-0233-02 


1 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


211 


MOODY T 


TRO PHYSICS LAB 1 


01321 


PHYS-0233-03 


1 


MWR 


1120AM 


0200PM 


WPS 


211 


WELLER M 


MIVERSITY PHYSICS 1 


01324 


PHYS-0235-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0925AM 


1105AM 


WPS 


213 


WELLER M 



ession IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

hysics - Undergraduate 



DLLEGE PHYSICS II 01318 PHYS-0232-01 3 MTWRF 0730AM 0910AM WPS 213 HENDERSON R 

NOTE: Students enrolling in PHYS 0232 or PHYS 0236 (lecture) should enroll in a PHYS 0234 (lab) section. 
TRO PHYSICS LAB II 01322 PHYS-0234-01 1 MTWRF 0730AM 0910AM WPS 212 MONTEMAYOR V 

TRO PHYSICS LAB II 01323 PHYS-0234-02 1 MTWRF 0925AM 1105AM WPS 212 HENDERSON R 

nIIVERSITY PHYSICS II 01325 PHYS-0236-01 3 MTWRF 0925AM 1105AM WPS 213 MONTEMAYOR V 

NOTE: Students enrolling in a PHYS 0236 (lecture) section should enroll in a PHYS 0234 (lab) section. 



Political Science 

Dr. John Vile, Peck Hall 209, 898-2708 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01178 
01181 



P S-0429-01 
P S-0429-04 



01179 PS-0429-02 



01180 PS-0429-03 



ession I CIcisses: May 1 1 -28 

ilitical Science • Undergraduate 



)LITICS AND FILM 


01166 


P S-0310-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


208 


BYRNES M 


PLIED PUB ADMIN 


01169 


P S-0326-01 


3 


MTWRF 0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


211 


VERNARDAKIS G 



ilitical Science - Graduate 

IBLIC ADMIN 01189 P S-0526-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM PH 211 VERNARDAKIS G 



83 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Political Science - Undergraduate 



FOUNDATIONS OF GOVT 
LAW & THE LEGAL SYS 
INTERNATIONAL REL 
STATE & LOCAL GOVT 
FORMER SOVIET UNION 
AMER FOREIGN POLICY 
SPEC TOPS IN POL SCI 



01161 
01164 
01167 
01170 
01173 
02192 
01182 



PS-01 22-01 
P S-0244-01 
P S-0321-01 
P S-0328-01 
P S-0377-01 
P S-0424-01 
P S-0439-01 



MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 
MTWR 



1010AM 
0600PM 
1010AM 
0730AM 
1250PM 
0730AM 
1010AM 



1230PM 
0820PM 
1230PM 
0950AM 
0310PM 
0950AM 
1230PM 



PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 
PH 



211 
208 
208 
211 
211 
208 
212 



NOTE: P S 0439-01 topic is "^ar and Revolution." 



Political Science - Graduate 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 
AMER FOREIGN POLICY 
STATE & LOCAL GOVT 



01187 PS-0521-01 
02193 PS-0524-01 
01190 PS-0528-01 



3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM PH 208 

3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM PH 208 

3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM PH 211 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Political Science - Undergraduate 



STATE & LOCAL GOVT 



QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 
PUB SERV INTERNSHIP 
PUB SERV INTERNSHIP 
PUB SERV INTERNSHIP 
PUB SERV INTERNSHIP 

Political Science ■ Graduate 

QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 
STATE & LOCAL GOVT 



02091 PS-0328-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: P S 0328-02 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

01176 PS-0411-01 3 T 0530PM 0950PM 

01178 PS-0429-01 3 TBA TBA 

01179 PS-0429-02 6 TBA TBA 

01180 PS-0429-03 9 TBA TBA 

01181 P S-0429-04 12 TBA TBA 



01184 PS-0511-01 3 T 0530PM 0950PM PH 

02074 PS-0528-02 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: P S 0528-02 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



TURNER J 
WHATLEY S 
SLOAN A 
CARLETON D 
TURNER J 
LIVINGSTON S 
TESIM 



SLOAN A 
LIVINGSTON S 
CARLETON D 



TBA 




LANGENBACH L 


PH 


320 


WALLACE J 


PH 


257 


LANGENBACH L 


PH 


257 


LANGENBACH L 


PH 


257 


LANGENBACH L 


PH 


257 


LANGENBACH L! 



WALLACE J 
LANGENBACH I 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Political Science - Undergraduate 

AMER GOVT & POL 01162 P S-01 50-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 

NOTE: P S 0150-01 is a Distance Learning telecourse. Students enrolling in this telecourse are REQUIRED 

to attend orientation on Tuesday, July 6, in Room 227 in Peck Hall from 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

COMP EUROPEAN GOVT 02088 

POL & PARTY SYSTEM 02092 

QUANT METH RESEARCH 01174 

MODERN POLIT THEORY 02037 



VILE J 



P S-0330-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


211 


VERNARDAKIS 


P S-0333-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


211 


LANGENBACH 


P S-0400-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


320 


PEREZ-REILLY 


P S-0492-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


211 


MCDANIEL R 



Political Science - Graduate 

QUAN METH S SCI RES 
COMP EUROPEAN GOVT 
POL AND PARTY SYSTEM 
MOD POLITICAL THEORY 



01183 P S-0500-01 

02089 P S-0530-01 

02178 PS-0533-01 

02181 P S-0592-01 



3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


320 


PEREZ-REILLY 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


211 


VERNARDAKIS 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


211 


LANGENBACH 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


211 


MCDANIEL R 



84 



TLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Psychology 



Dr. Larr/ Morris, Jones Hall 103, 898-2706 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01443 PSY-0710-01 



ession I Classes: May 1 

iychology • Undergraduate 



1-28 



ENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 


01329 


PSY-0141-01 


3 


MTWRF 


1000AM 


0100PM 


BAS 


S118 


BAUER R 


YCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 


01336 


PSY-0142-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


313 


WEST W 


YCH SOC BEHAVIOR 


01340 


PSY-0221-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


109A 


LITTLEPAGE G 


.VELOPMENTAL PSY 


01343 


PSY-0230-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


KOM 


105 


BELSKY J 


SIC STAT FOR BEH S 


01346 


PSY-0302-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


JH 


134 


KENDRICK D 


SEARCH METHODS 


01356 


PSY-0307-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


JH 


138 


SCHMIDT G 


NORMAL PSY 


01359 


PSY-0323-01 


3 


MTWRF 


1200PM 


0300PM 


BAS 


S270 


TATE J 


RSONALITY 


01364 


PSY-0359-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


BAS 


S324 


BRINTHAUPT T 


fRO COGNITIVE PSY 


01375 


PSY-0404-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


206 


SCHMIDT S 


ORT PSYCHOLOGY 


01379 


PSY-0406-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


104 


SOLOMON A 


ILD PSYCHOLOGY 


01380 


PSY-0419-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


JH 


238 


TRAUGHBER B 


RSUASION 


01391 


PSY-0439-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


PH 


212 


WHITESIDE H 


EORIES COUNSELING 


02350 


PSY-0447-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


105 


DANSBY V 


YCHOLOGY OF WOMEN 


01398 


PSY-0462-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


ATH & DYING 


01401 


PSY-0463-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


CKNB 


105 


PICKLESIMER B 



ychology • Graduate 



CRT PSYCHOLOGY 


01405 


PSY-0506-01 


3 


MTWR 


0800AM 


1200PM 


MC 


104 


SOLOMON A 


SEARCH METHODS 


01406 


PSY-0507-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


JH 


138 


SCHMIDT G 


NORMAL PSY 


01410 


PSY-0523-01 


3 


MTWRF 


1200PM 


0300PM 


BAS 


S270 


TATE J 


RSUASION 


01420 


PSY-0539-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


PH 


212 


WHITESIDE H 


EORIES COUNSELING 


02351 


PSY-0547-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


PH 


105 


DANSBY V 


YCHOLOGY OF WOMEN 


01425 


PSY-0562-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


ATH & DYING 


01427 


PSY-0563-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


CKNB 


105 


PICKLESIMER B 


V PSY ADOLESCENT 


02238 


PSY-0613-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0300PM 


0600PM 


JH 


134 


SLICKER E 


LTICULTURAL ASSESSMENT 


01443 


PSY-0710-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0300PM 


0600PM 


JH 


234 


BRISSIE J 


SESS TREAT ADDICTIONS 


01444 


PSY-0752-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0100PM 


0400PM 


JH 


138 


HAMILTON G 



ession II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

ychology - Undergraduate 



NERAL PSYCHOLOGY 


01330 


PSY-0141-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


109A 


BOYER-PENNINGT 


NERAL PSYCHOLOGY 


01331 


PSY-0141-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


214 


PLEAS J 


NERAL PSYCHOLOGY 


01332 


PSY-0141-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


109A 


COMPTON W 


CCH SOC BEHAVIOR 


01342 


PSY-0221-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S309 


PENNINGTON J 


/ELOPMENTAL PSY 


01344 


PSY-0230-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


105 


DAVIS T 


5IC STAT FOR BEH S 


01349 


PSY-0302-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


JH 


134 


VERMILLION W 


510 STAT FOR BEH S 


01350 


PSY-0302-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JH 


134 


KIM J 


;iC STAT FOR BEH S 


01351 


PSY-0302-04 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


105 


FULLER D 


SEARCH METHODS 


01357 


PSY-0307-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S324 


SCHMIDT G 


SEARCH METHODS 


01358 


PSY-0307-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


JH 


138 


LANGSTON W 


JORMAL PSY 


01360 


PSY-0323-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


313 


PLEAS J 



85 



TITLE 

PERSONALITY 
SENSATION & PERCEPTION 
INTRO COGNITIVE PSY 
PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY 
SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 
PSY OF CRIMINAL BEH 
CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 
BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 
PSY EXCEPTIONAL CH 
INTRO PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST 
MORALE ATTIT & M RES 
PERSUASION 
PSYCHOSEXUAL ADJUST 
ADULT PSY & AGING 
MULTICULTURAL EDUC 

Psychology - Graduate 

SENSATION & PERCEPTION 
PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY 
SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 
RESEARCH METHODS 
RESEARCH METHODS 
PSY OF CRIMINAL BEH 
BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 
PSY EXCEPTIONAL CH 
INTROD PSY TESTING 
PERSUASION 
PSYCHOSEXUAL ADJUST 
ADULT PSY & AGING 
MULTICULTURAL EDUC 
CAREER COUNSELING 
PSY DISORDERS OF CH 
FAMILY THERAPY 



ALL NO. 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


01365 


PSY-0359-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


213 


PENNINGTON J 


01374 


PSY-0403-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


206 


MUSICANT A 


02352 


PSY-0404-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


207 


BERNSTEIN S 


01377 


PSY-0405-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


02400 


PSY-0406-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


212 


WHITESIDE H 


02398 


PSY-0412-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


CKNB 


105 


HAMILTON G 


02353 


PSY-0419-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


109A 


BOYER-PENNIN( 


01383 


PSY-0424-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


313 


BAUER R 


01384 


PSY-0425-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S309 


RUST J 


01385 


PSY-0426-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


206 


QUARTO C 


02354 


PSY-0437-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S301 


BURKE B 


01392 


PSY-0439-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


313 


WHITESIDE H 


01397 


PSY-0460-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


02241 


PSY-0461-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


313 


BELSKY J 


01402 


PSY-0472-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S260 


WEST W 



01403 


PSY-0503-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


206 


MUSICANT A 


01404 


PSY-0505-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


02401 


PSY-0506-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


212 


WHITESIDE H 


01407 


PSY-0507-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S324 


SCHMIDT G 


01408 


PSY-0507-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


JH 


138 


LANGSTON W 


02399 


PSY-0512-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


CKNB 


105 


HAMILTON G 


01414 


PSY-0524-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


313 


BAUER R 


01415 


PSY-0525-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BAS 


S309 


RUST J 


01416 


PSY-0526-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


206 


QUARTO C 


01421 


PSY-0539-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


313 


WHITESIDE H 


01424 


PSY-0560-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


227 


HERITAGE J 


02248 


PSY-0561-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


313 


BELSKY J 


01429 


PSY-0572-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BAS 


S260 


WEST W 


01431 


PSY-0615-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JH 


234 


PICKLESIMER 


01433 


PSY-0640-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JH 


138 


FROMUTH M 


01439 


PSY-0682-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


JH 


134 


HAMILTON G 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Psychology • Undergraduate 



BASIC STAT FOR BEH S 


01352 


PSY-0302-05 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


313 


VERMILLION V 


SAFETY PSYCHOLOGY 


01387 


PSY-0435-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


313 


VERMILLION V 



Psychology - Graduate 

SAFETY PSYCHOLOGY 01418 PSY-0535-01 3 

ORGANIZATION SKILLS 02257 PSY-0637-01 3 

PSY RESEARCH METH IN HRM 01434 PSY-0657-01 3 

Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Psychology - Undergraduate 

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 
PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 



MW 
MW 
TR 



0600PM 
0600PM 
1250PM 



0815PM PH 

0815PM PH 

0310PM JH 



313 
107 
234 



VERMILLION V^ 
MOFFETT R 
HEINM 



01334 


PSY-0141-05 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


313 


QUARTO C 


01333 


PSY-0141-06 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


214 


DAVIS T 


01335 


PSY-0141-07 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


213 


BAUER R 


01339 


PSY -01 42-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


313 


WEST W 



86 



jITLt 


CALL NO 


. COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


EVELOPMENTAL PSY 


02260 


PSY-0230-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


214 


DAVIS T 


I^SIC STAT FOR BEH S 


01355 


PSY-0302-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


206 


KENDRICK D 


ASIC STAT FOR BEH S 


01353 


PSY-0302-07 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


213 


FULLER D 


ESEARCH METHODS 


02263 


PSY-0307-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JH 


138 


LANGSTON W 


^NORMAL PSY 


01362 


PSY-0323-03 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


206 


TATE J 


iTRO INDUST/ORGAN PSY 
boLESCENT PSY 


02264 


PSY-0332-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


109A 


MOFFETT R 


01382 


PSY-0421-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


313 


SLICKER E 


j^OUP DYNAMICS 

L. 


01390 


PSY-0438-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


206 


LITTLEPAGE G 


I=H MODIFICATION 


01393 


PSY-0440-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


312 


UJCICH K 


lARNING THEORIES 


01395 


PSY-0448-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


312 


KENDRICK D 



sychology - Graduate 



^SEARCH METHODS 


02265 


PSY-0507-04 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JH 


138 


LANGSTON W 


(OLESCENT PSY 


01409 


PSY-0521-01 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


313 


SLICKER E 


iNORMAL PSY 


01412 


PSY-0523-02 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


PH 


206 


TATE J 


TRO INDUST/ORGAN PSY 


02266 


PSY-0532-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


109A 


MOFFETT R 


lOUP DYNAMICS 


01419 


PSY-0538-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


206 


LITTLEPAGE G 


ARNING THEORIES 


01423 


PSY-0548-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


312 


KENDRICK D 


EORIES PERSONALITY 


02267 


PSY-0602-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


JH 


134 


JOHNSON J 


'ERVENTIONS: CHILDREN 


02268 


PSY-0608-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


JH 


138 


UJCICH K 


V PSYCHOLOGY CHILD 


01430 


PSY-0612-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


JH 


138 


CARLSON K 



ission I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

Dtography - Undergraduate 



Radio-TV/Photography 

Dr. Mary Nichols, Mass Communication 250, 898-5628 

NOTE: Students who fail to attend the first class meeting of RAW 312, 313, 314, 315, 320, 420, 491, 

or PHOT 320 without prior arrangements with the instructor will lose their places in class 

and those spaces will be made available to other students. 

The following courses are cross-listed between the Departments of Journalism and Radio-TVlPhotoeraphr 

151, 300, 420, 421, 461, 466, 479, 480, and 485. 

Students may take these courses in either Journalism or Radio-TV/Photography. 

Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01312 
01315 
01489 
01493 
01496 
02284 



PHOT-0320-01 
PHOT-400E-03 
RATV-0490-02 
RATV-358B-02 
RATV-400B-02 
RATV-491P-01 



01313 
02345 
01490 
01494 
01497 



PHOT-400E-01 
RATV-03 13-01 
RATV-0490-03 
RATV-358B-03 
RATV-400B-03 



01314 PHOT-400E-02 

01491 RATV-0490-01 

01492 RATV-358B-01 
01495 RATV-400B-01 
01498 RATV-491D-01 



ITAL IMAGING IN PHOTO 



01312 PHOT-0320-01 3 MTWRF 0100PM 0400PM COMM107 HARRIS C 



Jio-Television - Undergraduate 



^ODUCTION TO MASS COM 


01478 


RATV-0151-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


COMM104 


BURRISS L 


^O TO ELECT MEDIA 


01480 


RATV-0241-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


COMM103 


BERGT 


HT, SOUND AND MOTION 


01482 


RATV-0312-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


COMM150 


NICHOLS M 


' SEMINAR- Dl 


01498 


RATV-491D-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


COMM 148 


BARR M 



NOTE: RATV 491D-01 topic is "Intro to Digital Compositing. 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Photography - Undergraduate 



BLACK & WHITE PHOTO 



01311 PHOT-0305-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM PHO 101 JIMISON T 



Radio-Television - Undergraduate 



TV PROD 

MASS MEDIA LAW 

INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS 



02345 RATV-0313-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

01486 RATV-0420-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

01491 RATV-0490-01 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

NOTE: RAW049(HH topic is "Photo Non-Silver Processes." 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Photography - Undergraduate 



M C INTERN - PHOTO 
M INTERN - PHOTO 
M INTERN - PHOTO 



01313 PHOT-400E-01 1 TBA TBA 

01314 PHOT-400E-02 2 TBA TBA 

01315 PHOT-400E-03 3 TBA TBA 



Radio-Television - Undergraduate 

INTRODUCTION TO MASS COM 01479 

M C PRACT - BDCST 01492 

M C PRACT - BDCST 01493 

M C PRACT - BDCST 01494 

M C INTERN - BDCST 01495 

M CINTERN - BDCST 01496 

M C INTERN - BDCST 01497 

DISK-BASED AUDIO POST 01488 



INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS 
INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS 



01489 
01490 



RATV-0151-02 
RATV-358B-01 
RATV-358B-02 
RATV-358B-03 
RATV-400B-01 
RATV-400B-02 
RATV-400B-03 
RATV-0458-01 

RATV-0490-02 
RATV-0490-03 



TR 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

T 

R 

TBA 

TBA 



1250PM 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

0210PM 

0210PM 

TBA 

TBA 



0245PM 



0420PM 
0515PM 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Radio-Television - Undergraduate 

INTRODUCTION TO MASS COM 02283 

INTRO TO MOTION PICT 01 481 

MASS MEDIA LAW 01487 

ADV SEMINAR - ELEC MEDIA PROD 02284 



COMM150 
COMM104 
PHO 102 



TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



C0MM151 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 

COMM 250 
COMM 250 
COMM 250 
COMM 183 
COMM 183 
TBA 
TBA 



JOHNSON M 
KIMBRELL E 
NORTON J 



JIMISON T 
JIMISON T 
JIMISON T 



CAMPBELL R 
NICHOLS M 
NICHOLS M 
NICHOLS M 
NICHOLS M 
NICHOLS M 
NICHOLS M 
MITCHELL D 

JIMISON T 
JIMISON T 



RATV-0151-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM 150 


HICKS C 


RATV-0300-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM 103 


SPIRES R 


RATV-0420-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM 103 


NEAL D 


RATV-491P-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


COMM 125 


SPIRES R 



NOTE: RATV491P-01 topic is "AVID Editing. 



Recording Industry 



Mr. Chris Haseleu, Mass Communication 252, 898-2578 

NOTE- Students who fail to attend the first class meeting of RIM 123, 377, 419, 429,440, 449, ^f^^J';'^'^^^''"^^^ 
a^angementwith the instructor will lose their places in class and those spaces w.ll be made available to other stude 
Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 

01568 RIM-0358-02 01569 RIM-0358-03 



01567 RIM-0358-01 

01570 RIM-0358-04 

01577 RIM-0400-03 

01580 RIM-0400-06 

01583 RIM-0400-09 



01575 RIM-0400-01 

01578 RIM-0400-04 

01581 RIM-0400-07 

01584 RIM-0400-10 



01576 RIM-0400-02 

01579 RIM-0400-05 

01582 RIM-0400-08 

01585 RIM-0400-11 



88 



LE 





CALL NO. 


COURSE ID HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 




LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


01586 


RIM-0401-01 


01587 


RIM-0401-02 




01588 


RIM-0401-03 




01589 


RIM-0401-04 


01590 


RIM-0401-05 




01591 


RIM-0401-06 




01592 


RIM-0401-07 


01593 


RIM-0401-08 




01594 


RlM-0401-09 




01595 


RIM-0401-10 


01596 


RIM-0401-11 




01597 


RIM-0401-12 




01609 


RIM-0481-01 


01610 


RIM-0481-02 











ission I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

cording Industry - Undergraduate 



)I0 FOR MEDIA 



02015 RIM-0301-01 3 
NOTE: RIM 0301 requires enrollment in the co 
NOTE: RIM 0303 requires enrollment in 

RO TO REC STUDIO 01563 RIM-0303-01 1 

RO TO REC STUDIO 01564 RIM-0303-02 1 

=tO TO REC STUDIO 02095 RIM-0303-03 1 

PRACTICUM 01567 RIM-0358-01 1 

IST MANAGEMENT 01573 RIM-0372-01 3 

;ORD IND INTER: BIZ 01575 RIM-0400-01 1 

;ORD IND INTER: BIZ 01576 RIM-0400-02 2 

;ORD IND INTERN: TECH 01586 RIM-0401-01 1 

;ORD IND INTERN: TECH 01587 RIM-0401-02 2 

vj PRACT OF ELEC MUS 01598 RIM-0419-01 3 

JCERT PROMOTION 01600 RIM-0432-01 3 

nCAL LISTENING 01602 RIM-0444-01 3 

JNDTRACK DESIGN 02389 RIM-0457-01 3 

;ORD RETAIL OPERATIONS 02094 RIM-0472-01 3 

IDIOADM 01608 RIM-0474-01 3 

ission II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

:ording Industry - Undergraduate 



MTWRF 1230PM 0330PM COMM101 

■requisite RIM 0303 - Intro to the Recording Studio, 
the co-requisite RIM 0301 - Audio for Media. 



MTWRF 0900AM 
MTWRF 1000AM 
MTWRF 1100AM 
TBA TBA 

MTWRF 0900AM 
TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

MTWRF 1000AM 
MTWRF 1210PM 
MTWRF 0100PM 
MTWRF 0345PM 
MTWRF 0900AM 
MTWRF 0900AM 



0950AM 
1050AM 
1150AM 



0100PM 
0310PM 
0400PM 
0645PM 
1200PM 
1200PM 



C0MM191 

C0MM191 

C0MM191 

TBA 

BAS S275 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

COMM180 

COMM149 

C0MM191 

COMM101 

COMM149 

COMM101 



HASELEUC 



JONES D 
JONES D 
JONES D 
HASELEU C 
HICKS J 
BARNET R 
BARNET R 
PFEIFER D 
PFEIFER D 
WOOD R 
BARNET R 
HILL J 
ROPER B 
HUTCHISON T 
PFEIFER D 



5ICIANSHIP FOR REC ENG 


01558 


RIM-0123-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM149 


WOOD R 


r OF RECORD IND 


01559 


RIM-0300-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM103 


FISCHER P 


10 FOR MEDIA 


02016 


RIM-0301-02 


3 


MTWR 


0330PM 


0550PM 


COMM101 


JONES D 


NOTE: RIM 0301 requires enrollment in 


the co-requisite RIM 0303 - Intro to the Recording Studio. 




NOTE: 


RIM 0303 


requires enrollment in 


the co-requisite RIM 0301 - Audio for Media. 




^0 TO REC STUDIO 


02096 


RIM-0303-04 


1 


MTWR 


0905AM 


0955AM 


C0MM191 


PIEKARSKI J 


RO TO REC STUDIO 


01565 


RIM-0303-05 


1 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1100AM 


C0MM191 


PIEKARSKI J 


RO TO REC STUDIO 


01566 


RIM-0303-06 


1 


MTWR 


1115AM 


1205PM 


C0MM191 


PIEKARSKI J 


>YRIGHT LAW 


01572 


RIM-0370-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM103 


MOSER D 


ORD IND INTER: BIZ 


01577 


RIM-0400-03 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


* 


TBA 


BARNET R 


ORD IND INTER: BIZ 


01578 


RIM-0400-04 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


BARNET R 


ORD IND INTERN: TECH 


01588 


RIM-0401-03 


1 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


PFEIFER D 


ORD IND INTERN: TECH 


01589 


RIM-0401-04 


2 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 


PFEIFER D 


NJ PRACT OF ELEC MUS 


01599 


RIM-0419-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM180 


PIEKARSKI J 


JNDTRACK DESIGN 


01603 


RIM-0457-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM101 


KENNEDY C 


1KETING RECORDINGS 


01605 


RIM-0462-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


COMM149 


HUTCHISON T 


ICS IN RECORDING IND 


01609 


RIM-0481-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


COMM101 


MITCHELL D 



NOTE: RIM 0481-01 topic is "Concepts and Development of Multi-Channel Audio.' 



M- Monday T- Tuesday W - Wednesday R- Thursday F- Friday S- Saturday TR - Tuesday/Thursday 

Courses numbered 0100-0499 are undergraduate and open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Courses numbered OSOO and al>ove are open only to graduate students. 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Recording Industry - Undergraduate 

RIMPRACTICUM 01568 RIM-0358-02 1 

RIMPRACTICUM 01569 RIM-0358-03 2 

RIMPRACTICUM 01570 RIM-0358-04 3 

RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 01579 RIM-0400-05 1 

RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 01580 RIM-0400-06 2 

RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 01581 RIM-0400-07 3 

RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 01582 RIM-0400-08 4 

RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 01590 RIM-0401-05 1 

RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 01591 RIM-0401-06 2 

RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 01592 RIM-0401-07 3 

TECHNIQUES OF RECORD 02097 RIM-0440-01 3 

DISK-BASED AUDIO POST 01604 RIM-0458-01 3 

NASHVILLE MUSIC BUSINESS 02143 RIM-0480-01 



TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TR 

T 

R 

TBA 



TIME 



TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

0330PM 0550PM 

0210PM 0420PM 

0210PM 0515PM 

TBA 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 1 



NOTE: RIM 0480-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



Session IV Classes: July 6 ■ August 7 

Recording Industry - Undergraduate 



COMMER SONGWRITING 
SURVEY OF RECORDING 
MUSIC PUBLISHING 
RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 
RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 
RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 
RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 
LEGAL PROB REC IND 
TOPICS IN RECORDING IND 



02093 
01571 
01574 
01583 
01584 
01593 
01594 
01607 
01610 



RIM-0302-01 
RIM-0360-01 
RlM-0390-01 
RIM-0400-09 
RIM-0400-10 
RIM-0401-08 
RIM-0401-09 
RIM-0470-01 
RIM-0481-02 



MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

MTWR 

MTWR 



1010AM 

1250PM 

0730AM 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

1010AM 

1250PM 



1230PM 
0310PM 
0950AM 



1230PM 
0310PM 



NOTE: RIM 0481-02 topic is "Music as Popular Culture. 



Session VIII Classes: May 11 - August 7 

Recording Industry - Undergraduate 



RECORD IND INTER: BIZ 
RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 
RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 
RECORD IND INTERN: TECH 



01585 RlM-0400-11 

01595 RlM-0401-10 

01596 RIM-0401-11 

01597 RIM-0401-12 



6 TBA TBA 

4 TBA TBA 

5 TBA TBA 

6 TBA TBA 



TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

COMM 191 

COMM183 

COMM 183 

TBA 



COMM 149 
COMM 101 
COMM 149 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 

COMM 101 
COMM 149 



HASELEU C 
HASELEU C 
HASELEU C 
BARNET R 
BARNET R 
BARNET R 
BARNET R 
PFEIFER D 
PFEIFER D 
PFEIFER D 
KENNEDY 
MITCHELL D 

HUTCHISON T 



MULRAINE L 
O'BRIEN M 
O'BRIEN M 
BARNET R 
BARNET R 
PFEIFER D 
PFEIFER D 
HULLG 
FISCHER P 



TBA 


BARNET R 


TBA 


PFEIFER D 


TBA 


PFEIFER D 


TBA 


PFEIFER D 



Social Work 

Dr. Charles Frost, Peck Hall 308, 898-2868 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01620 


S W-0459-01 


02200 


S W-0480-01 


01621 


S W-0480-02 


01622 


S W-0480-03 


01623 


S W-0480-04 


01624 


S W-0480-05 


01625 


S W-0480-06 











90 



IE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



bssion I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

cial Work - Undergraduate 



>ICS IN S W 



02203 SW-0415-01 3 MTWR 0800AM 1200PM BAS 

NOTE: S W-0415-01 topic is "Crazy Hollywood: Movies about Mental Health." 



S208 



FROST C 



ssion II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

cial Work • Undergraduate 



RO TO SOCIAL WORK 


02201 


S W-0257-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


321 


SANBORN J 


-. CYCLE 


01617 


SW-03 15-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


319 


CARROLL C 


^AN BEHAVIOR 


02198 


SW-03 16-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


321 


SANBORN J 


'ICSINS W 


02199 


S W-04 15-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


JUB 


202 


TAYLOR J 



NOTE: S W-04 15-02 topic is "Family Caregivers." 



ssion III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

:ial Work - Undergraduate 

D INSTRUCTION I 01620 



;CIAL PROJECTS 



02200 



S W-0459-01 


6 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




FONTANESI-SEIME 






M 


0900AM 


1100AM 


BAS 


S338 




S W-0480-01 


6 


MTWR 


0800AM 


0430PM 


PH 


309 


SHAW-MCEWEN S 



NOTE: S W-0480-01 topic is "Using the 'Nquzo Saba' (Principles of Blackness) in our Community: Theory and Practice." 

:CIAL PROJECTS 01621 S W-0480-02 1 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 

:CIAL PROJECTS 01622 S W-0480-03 2 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 

CIAL PROJECTS 01623 S W-0480-04 3 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 

CIAL PROJECTS 01624 S W-0480-05 4 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 

iCIAL PROJECTS 01625 S W-0480-06 5 TBA TBA TBA STAFF 



!Ssion IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

:ial Work - Undergraduate 



CYCLE 
•ICSINSW 



01618 SW-0315-02 3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM PH 

02202 SW-0415-03 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM BAS 

NOTE: S W-0415-03 topic is "Cod's Hollywood: Movies about Spirituality." 



321 
S278 



RUCKER R 
FROST C 



Sociology and Anthropology 

Dr. Peter Heller, Peck Hall 316, 898-2508 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



ssion I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

:iology - Undergraduate 



00105 


ANTH-0475-01 


00106 


ANTH-0475-02 


00111 


ANTH-0490-01 


00112 


ANTH-0490-02 


00115 


ANTH-0575-01 


01679 


SOC-0664-01 


01680 


SOC-0664-02 


01681 


SOC-0664-03 


01682 


SOC-0664-04 


01683 


SOC-0664-05 


01684 


SOC-0664-06 


01686 


SOC-0690-01 



lOD SOCIOLOGY 
ICS IN SOCIOLOGY 



01643 SOC-0101-01 3 MTWR 0600PM 0940PM 

01657 SOC-0415-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

NOTE: SOC 0415-01 topic is "Sociology of Emotions." 



91 



PH 
PH 



319 
318 



STAFF 
ELLER J 



TITLE 

TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



01658 SOC-0415-02 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM 

NOTE: SOC 0415-02 topic is "Sociology of Gangs in America." 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

PH 319 AUSTIN B 



Session II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Anthropology - Undergraduate 

CULT ANTHROPOLOGY 
ARCH FIELD SCHOOL 
ARCH FIELD SCHOOL 

Sociology - Undergraduate 



00102 ANTH-0310-01 

00105 ANTH-0475-01 

00106 ANTH-0475-02 



3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


318 


WELLS M 


3 


TWRF 


0800AM 


0430PM 


PH 


317 


SMITH K 


6 


TWRF 


0800AM 


0430PM 


PH 


317 


SMITH K 



INTROD SOCIOLOGY 


01645 


SOC-0101-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


318 


WALLACE J 


CULT ANTHROPOLOGY 


01649 


SOC-03 10-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


318 


WELLS M 


LIFE CYCLE 


01650 


SOC-0315-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


319 


CARROLL C 


DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 


02155 


SOC-0325-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


319 


ELLER J 


MARRIAGE & FAMILY 


01652 


SOC-0350-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


319 


CARROLL C 


RACE & ETHNIC RELAT 


02158 


SOC-0424-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


105 


AUSTIN B 



Anthropology - Graduate 

ARCH FIELD SCHOOL 00115 ANTH-0575-01 3 



Sociology - Graduate 

RACE & ETHNIC RELATI 



02159 SOC-0524-01 



TWRF 0800AM 0430PM 



MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 



PH 317 



PH 105 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Sociology - Undergraduate 

DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 



TBA 



QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 



Sociology - Graduate 



02417 SOC-0325-02 3 TBA TBA 

NOTE: SOC 0325-02 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

01656 SOC-0411-01 3 T 0530PM 0950PM PH 



320 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Anthropology - Undergraduate 



SMITH K 



AUSTIN B 



ELLER J 



WALLACE J 



QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 


01671 


SOC-0511-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 0950PM PH 


320 


WALLACE J 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01679 


SOC-0664-01 


1 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01680 


SOC-0664-02 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01681 


SOC-0664-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01682 


SOC-0664-04 


4 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01683 


SOC-0664-05 


5 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


THESIS RESEARCH 


01684 


SOC-0664-06 


6 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 




HELLER P 


PRAC: APPLIED ANAL 


01686 


SOC-0690-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


PH 


365 


ADAYR 



INTRO TO ANTHROPOLOGY 


02169 


ANTH-01 00-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


318 


PACE R 


ANTH INTERNSHIP 


00111 


ANTH-0490-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




BLH 


201 


SMITH K 


ANTH INTERNSHIP 


00112 


ANTH-0490-02 


6 


TBA 


TBA 




BLH 


201 


SMITH K 



92 



LE 


CAll NO 


COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


IOC/ 


moN 


INSTRUCTOR 


ciology - Undergraduate 




















ROD SOCIOLOGY 


01644 


SOC-0101-03 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


319 


HELLER P 


CIAL PROBLEMS 


01647 


SOC-0201-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


319 


SCHNELLER D 


E CYCLE 


01651 


SOC-0315-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


321 


RUCKER R 


/lANT BEHAVIOR 


02175 


SOC-0325-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


318 


NATION P 


RRIAGE & FAMILY 


02179 


SOC-0350-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


318 


ADAY R 


AN METH S SC RES 


01654 


SOC-0400-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


320 


PEREZ-REILLY M 


DIOLOGY OF AGING 


01655 


SOC-0402-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


105 


ADAYR 


MINOLOGY 


01661 


SOC-0430-01 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


PH 


319 


NATION P 


SENILE DELINQUENCY 


01663 


SOC-0454-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


PH 


105 


SCHNELLER D 



ciology - Graduate 

AN METH S SC RES 

3IOLOGY OF AGING 

IMINOLOGY 

SENILE DELINQUENCY 



01669 SOC-0500-01 

01670 SOC-0502-01 
01673 SOC-0530-01 
01675 SOC-0554-01 



3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 

3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 

3 MTWR 0730AM 0950AM 

3 MTWR 1250PM 0310PM 



PH 


320 


PEREZ-REILLY M 


PH 


105 


ADAYR 


PH 


319 


NATION P 


PH 


105 


SCHNELLER D 



Speech and Theatre 

Dr. Russell Church, Boutwell Dramatic Arts 205, 898-2640 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01746 


SPEE-0362-01 


01748 


SPEE-0426-01 


01754 


SPEE-0490-01 


01755 


SPEE-0490-02 


01756 


SPEE-0490-03 


01758 


SPEE-0526-01 


01764 


SPEE-410A-02 


01765 


SPEE-410A-03 


01766 


SPEE-410B-01 


01767 


SPEE-410B-02 


01768 


SPEE-410B-03 


01769 


SPEE-410C-01 


01770 


SPEE-410C-02 


01771 


SPEE-410C-03 


01772 


SPEE-410D-01 


01773 


SPEE-410D-02 


01774 


SPEE-410D-03 


01775 


SPEE-410E-01 


01776 


SPEE-410E-02 


01777 


SPEE-410E-03 


01778 


SPEE-410F-01 


01779 


SPEE-410F-02 


01780 


SPEE-410F-03 


01794 


SPEE-510E-01 


01795 


SPEE-510E-02 


01796 


SPEE-510E-03 


01797 


SPEE-510F-01 


01798 


SPEE-510F-02 


01799 


SPEE-510F-03 







ssion I Classes: May 11-28 

eech and Theatre • Undergraduate 



ID OF SPEECH 


01729 


SPEE-0220-01 


3 


mtwrf 


0800AM 


1100AM 


BDA 


214 


WALKER D 


ID OF SPEECH 


01730 


SPEE-0220-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


314 


KRUEGER M 


ID OF SPEECH 


01731 


SPEE-0220-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


218 


ANDERSON D 


ID OF SPEECH 


01732 


SPEE-0220-04 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


307 


LEWIS B 


ERPERSONAL COMMUNICA 


02024 


SPEE-0230-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


FH 


201 


JONES M 


;atre appreciation 


01738 


SPEE-0305-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


101 


STURGEON J 


CE & DICTION 


01741 


SPEE-0315-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0800AM 


1100AM 


BDA 


216 


HILLMAN R 


iC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01763 


SPEE-410A-01 


3 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


iC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01766 


SPEE-41 08-01 


3 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


iC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01769 


SPEE-410C-01 


3 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


.C IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01772 


SPEE-41 OD-01 


3 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


iC IN SP-LANG PATH II 


01775 


SPEE-410E-01 


3 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


iC IN SP-LANG PATH III 


01778 


SPEE-410F-01 


6 


MTWRF 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


E & LANG DEVEL 


01750 


SPEE-0442-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


320 


FISCHER R 


CIAL EFFECTS MAKE-UP 


01753 


SPEE-0466-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0900AM 


1200PM 


BDA 


120 


DONNELL V 



93 



TITLE CALL NO. 

Speech and Theatre - Graduate 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 01782 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 01785 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 01788 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 01791 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH II 01794 

PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH III 01797 

SPEE & LANG DEVEL 01760 

SPECIAL EFFECTS MAKE-UP 01762 



COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



SPEE-510A-01 
SPEE-510B-01 
SPEE-510C-01 
SPEE-510D-01 
SPEE-510E-01 
SPEE-510F-01 
SPEE-0542-01 
SPEE-0566-01 



MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF TBA 
MTWRF 0900AM 
MTWRF 0900AM 



1200PM 
1200PM 



TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

BDA 320 

BOA 120 



Session II Classes: May 31 ■ July 2 

Speech and Theatre - Undergraduate 



FUND OF SPEECH 
FUND OF SPEECH 
FUND OF SPEECH 
THEATRE APPRECIATION 
VOICE & DICTION 
COMMUNICATION THEORY 
APPLIED SPEECH 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH I 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH I 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH I 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH I 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH II 
PRAC IN SP-LANG PATH III 
SPEE & LANG DEVEL 
INTERCULTURAL COMM 



Speech and Theatre - Graduate 



COMM IN ED ENVIR 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH 1 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH I 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH II 
PRAC-SPEE-LAN PATH III 
SPEE & LANG DEVEL 
INTERCULTURAL COMM 



01757 
01783 
01786 
01789 
01792 
01795 
01798 
01761 
02382 



SPEE-0500-01 
SPEE-510A-02 
SPEE-510B-02 
SPEE-510C-02 
SPEE-510D-02 
SPEE-510E-02 
SPEE-510F-02 
SPEE-0542-02 
SPEE-0556-01 



MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

MTWR 

TBA 

MTWR 

MTWR 



1250PM 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

1250PM 

1250PM 



0310PM 



0310PM 
0310PM 



BDA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 
BDA 
BDA 



218 



216 
314 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Speech and Theatre - Undergraduate 



READ IN SPEECH COMM 
INTERNSHIP IN SPEE COMM 
INTERNSHIP IN SPEE COMM 
INTERNSHIP IN SPEE COMM 



01748 SPEE-0426-01 3 

01754 SPEE-0490-01 1 

01755 SPEE-0490-02 2 

01756 SPEE-0490-03 3 



TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 

TBA TBA 



Speech and Theatre - Graduate 

READ IN SPEECH COMM 01758 SPEE-0526-01 



HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
FISCHER R 
DONNELL V 



01733 


SPEE-0220-05 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BDA 


214 


JOHNSON R 


01734 


SPEE-0220-06 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BDA 


214 


ARNOLD D 


01735 


SPEE-0220-07 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BDA 


214 


ARNOLD D 


01739 


SPEE-0305-02 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


103A 


ANDERSON D 


01742 


SPEE-0315-02 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BDA 


216 


HILLMAN R 


02415 


SPEE-0330-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BDA 


216 


CHURCH R 


01746 


SPEE-0362-01 


1 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




STAFF 


01764 


SPEE-410A-02 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01767 


SPEE-410B-02 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01770 


SPEE-410C-02 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01773 


SPEE-410D-02 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01776 


SPEE-410E-02 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01779 


SPEE-410F-02 


6 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


01751 


SPEE-0442-02 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BDA 


216 


CLARK B 


02025 


SPEE-0456-01 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BDA 


314 


JOHNSON R 



CHURCH R 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
HANCOCK M 
CLARK B 
JOHNSON R 



TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 


TBA 


STAFF 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



STAFF 



94 



TLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

leech and Theatre - Undergraduate 



IND OF SPEECH 


01737 


SPEE-0220-08 


3 


MTWR 


0730AM 


0950AM 


BDA 


214 


SNIDERMAN M 


IND OF SPEECH 


02026 


SPEE-0220-09 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


BOA 


214 


SNIDERMAN M 


ND OF SPEECH 


01736 


SPEE-0220-10 


3 


MTWR 


1250PM 


0310PM 


BDA 


214 


MC GILLIARD D 


EATRE APPRECIATION 


01740 


SPEE-0305-03 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


SAG 


208 


MC GILLIARD D 


JILD DRAMA SPEECH 


01743 


SPEE-0316-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


227 


HALLADAY J 


lAC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01765 


SPEE-410A-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


lAC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01768 


SPEE-410B-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01771 


SPEE-410C-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC IN SP-LANG PATH 1 


01774 


SPEE-410D-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


.AC IN SP-LANG PATH II 


01777 


SPEE-410E-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC IN SP-LANG PATH III 


01780 


SPEE-410F-03 


6 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


leech and Theatre - 


Graduate 


















AC-SPEE-LAN PATH 1 


01784 


SPEE-510A-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC-SPEE-LAN PATH 1 


01787 


SPEE-510B-03 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC-SPEE-LAN PATH 1 


01790 


SPEE-510C-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC-SPEE-LAN PATH 1 


01793 


SPEE-510D-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC-SPEE-LAN PATH II 


01796 


SPEE-510E-03 


3 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


AC-SPEE-LAN PATH III 


01799 


SPEE-510F-03 


6 


MTWR 


TBA 




TBA 




HANCOCK M 


ILD DRAMA SPEECH 


02384 


SPEE-0516-01 


3 


MTWR 


1010AM 


1230PM 


PH 


227 


HALLADAY J 



University Honors^ College of 

Dr. John Paul Montgomery, Peck Hall 106, 898-2152 

NOTE: To qualify for enrollment in Honors courses, returning students must have cumulative GPA of 3.0. 

New freshmen must have minimum ACT composite score of 26 OR a high school GPA of 3.5 

and an ACT composite of 20 or better. 

ession I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

JIOR INTER SEMINAR 01971 U H-350H-01 3 MTWRF 0900AM 1200PM PH 108 HAGUE A 

NOTE: U H 350H topic is "The UFO Debate." 
NOTE: Students enrolling in U H 350H-01 may receive three hours upper division credit from the English Department. 

University 101 

Ms. Faye Johnson, Cope Administration Building 119, 898-2880 

jssion I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

01974 UNIV-0101-01 3 MTWR 0600PM 0910PM BAS S343 ROLLINS M 

jsslon II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

V101 02393 UNIV-0101-02 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM MC 105 PATTERSON L 



V101 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Women's Studies 

Dr. Jackie Eller, Peck Hall 109B, 898-5910 
NOTE: Please contact department chair for permission to enroll in the following class(es). 



01998 WM S-0490-01 



Session 11 Classes: May 31 - July 2 

Departmental 



WOMEN IN LITERATURE 
WOMEN WRITERS 20TH 



00493 
02080 



ENGL-0223-04 
ENGL-0310-01 



MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 
MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 



PH 
JH 



300A 
238 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 



Interdisciplinary 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 



01997 WMS-0210-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 
NOTE: WM S 0210-01 is a Distance Learning correspondence course. 

For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

01998 WM S-0490-01 3 TBA TBA TBA 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 



Departmental 

WOMEN IN FILM 



02104 ENGL-0308-01 



MTWR 0330PM 0550PM 



PH 21£ 



CANTRELL B 
BARNETT C 



OSBORNE R 



ELLER J 



DUNNE S 




NEW SUMMER CLASS TIMES!! 



Standard class times have changed for Sessions 11, ill, and 
iV. New class times in Sessions 11 and IV allow 20 minutes 
between classes. New class times in Session III allow 15 
minutes between classes. For further information, see course 
listings by department. 




96 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Distance Learning Classes 

Dr. Rosemary Owens, Cope Administration Building 1 1 3, 898-21 11 

NOTE: Register for distance learning classes by TRAM or WebMT. 
A $25 late fee will be charged if registration is on or after the first day of class. 

Distance learning occurs when there is a physical separation of the teacher and learner and when communica- 
tion and instruction take place through, or are supported by, any technological means such as telephone, 
radio, television, computer, satellite delivery, or interactive video, or any combination of present and future 
telecommunication technologies. Distance learning allows MTSU to make more courses available and more 
easily accessible to a larger number of students. 



Compressed Video Courses 



Dennis Bain, KirkseyOld Main 122, 898-5426 

mpressed video is a technology that condenses auditory and visual signals so they can be sent over fiber optic T1 or other 

jphone lines (in this case 11 lines) to sites that have specialized equipment. The equipment allows the MTSU instructor to 

timunicate with various remote sites and interact visually and verbally through a television monitor. Compressed video 

jrses are offered for credit. 

Compressed video classes in Columbia are held at Columbia State Community College, Warff Building, Room 107. 

Classes in Tullahoma are held at Motlow State Community College, Simon Hall, Room S234. 

Classes in Lawrenceburg are held at the CSCC Lawrence County Center. 



jssion I Classes: May 1 1 -28 



fH FOR MID SCH TEACH 
TH FOR MID SCH TEACH 
FH FOR MID SCH TEACH 
rH FOR MID SCH TEACH 



01002 


MATH-0401-01 


3 


MTWRF 


0930AM 


1230PM 


01003 


MATH-0401-02 


3 


MTWRF 


0930AM 


1230PM 


01004 


MATH-0401-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0930AM 


1230PM 


01005 


MATH-0401-04 


3 


MTWRF 


0930AM 


1230PM 



KOM 122 ASPINWALL L 

COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 
LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 



ission 111 Classes: May 31 ■ August 7 



HOPHYSIOLOGY 
HOPHYSIOLOGY 
HOPHYSIOLOGY 
HOPHYSIOLOGY 



01156 NURS-0334-01 3 M 

02339 NURS-0334-02 3 M 

02340 NURS-0334-03 3 M 

02341 NURS-0334-04 3 M 



0430PM 0830PM 

0430PM 0830PM 

0430PM 0830PM 

0430PM 0830PM 



CKNB 106 DRAUDE B 

COLUMBIA DRAUDE B 

LAWRENCBRG DRAUDE B 
TULLAHOMA DRAUDE B 



jssion IV Classes: July 6 ■ August 7 



N OF MARKETING 
N OF MARKETING 
N OF MARKETING 
N OF MARKETING 



02167 MKT-0382-06 3 TR 

02168 MKT-0382-07 3 TR 

02170 MKT-0382-08 3 TR 

02171 MKT-0382-09 3 TR 



0600PM 1020PM 

0600PM 1020PM 

0600PM 1020PM 

0600PM 1020PM 



BAS S273 STAFF 

COLUMBIA STAFF 

LAWRENCBRG STAFF 

TULLAHOMA STAFF 



jssion V Classes: May 11 ■ July 2 



EARCH IN MATH ED 


02407 


MATH-0690-01 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


EARCH IN MATH ED 


02408 


MATH-0690-02 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


EARCH IN MATH ED 


02409 


MATH-0690-03 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


.EARCH IN MATH ED 


02410 


MATH-0690-04 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 



97 



KOM 122 ASPINWALL L 

COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 
LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Correspondence Courses 

Mary Jane Peters, Business and Aerospace Building N102, 898-5060 

Correspondence courses involve individual, independent instruction of a student by an instructor on a one-to- 
one basis. Typically, this will entail study at home, as well as the exchange of materials and evaluations through 
a mail/courier seivice. Interaction and feedback between correspondence course faculty and students take the 
forms of written assignments, testing, evaluations, guidance, and assistance via such media as print/written 
word, telephone, fax, e-mail, and other electronic technologies. 

After registration, students will receive a packet of information from the correspondence course coordinator. 
For full-time students, the packet of information will be sent to their campus post office box. Part-time stu- 
dents will receive the packet of information at their home address. If the packet of information is not received 
within two weeks after the first day of class, please contact the coordinator at the phone number above. 

Session 111 Classes: May 31 - August 7 

INTRO AG ENGINEERING 
INTRO TO GJA 

WOMEN, CRIME & JUST ADM 
COMM REL & MIN PROBS 
JUVENILE JUSTICE SYS 
EFFECTIVE LIVING 
PRINC OF NUTRITION 
MATH FOR HEALTH PROF 
STATE & LOCAL GOVT 
STATE & LOCAL GOVT 
NASHVILLE MUSIC BUSINESS 
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 
WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Telecourses 

Liz Johnson, Kirksey Old Main 1 26, 898-5374 
www.mtsu.edu/~tlcourse 

Telecourses are courses offered for credit and delivered via cable television or videotape instead of through 
on-campus lectures. Students are required to attend an orientation on campus, then view the videos and 
complete the assignments at home. Instructors provide a detailed syllabus, prepare and grade assignments and 
tests, and consult with students by telephone or e-mail. Students meet again on campus for exams. 

MTSU does not loan out sets of telecourse tapes to students, but MTSU offers several ways for students to 
view the telecourses. All telecourses will be shown on MTSU-9 (Channel 9 on Intermedia cable in Rutherford 
County). All telecourses can be viewed at the Ned McWherter Learning Resources Center on MTSU's campus. 
All telecourses may be rented from MTSU for $35 per set. These will be available at the telecourse office on 
orientation day. Telecourses which are not licensed for duplication may be rented from a rental agency for $55 
plus shipping. Information on these agencies is available at the orientation and at the telecourse office. It is the 
student's responsibility to ensure access to the telecourses. 

NOTE: Students enrolling in telecourses are REQUIRED to attend the orientation indicated 
for that particular telecourse (see below). 

The telecourse orientation is considered the FIRST CLASS. Because attendance is REQUIRED, it is inriportant that 
another class is not scheduled at the same time. It is requested that children not attend the orientation. 



98 



00004 


ABAS-0221-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


JOHNSTON T 


00287 


CJA-01 10-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


BERRETTA B 


02418 


CJA-0370-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


BERRETTA B 


00292 


CJA-0422-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


BERRETTA B 


02419 


CJA-0450-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


BERRETTA B 


00825 


HLTH-0310-12 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


WHALEY M 


01147 


N FS-01 24-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


COLSON J 


02262 


MATH-0209-01 


2 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


RAINES J 


02091 


P S-0328-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


LANGENBACH 


02074 


P S-0528-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


LANGENBACH 


02143 


RIM-0480-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


HUTCHISON T 


02417 


SOC-0325-02 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


ELLER J 


01997 


WM S-0210-01 


3 


TBA 


TBA 


TBA 


OSBORNE R 



LE CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 

jssion I Classes: May 1 1 -28 

'ERIENCE OF LIT 00474 ENGL-0211-02 3 TBA 

Orientation: Tuesday. May 11, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 103A 
Mid-term Exam: Wednesday, May 19, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 103B 
Final Exam: Thursday, May 27, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 103B 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



TBA 



TBA 



-ECTIVE LIVING 00817 HLTH-0310-04 2 TBA 

Orientation: Tuesday, May 11, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Wednesday, May 19, 1999. 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 104 
Final Exam: Thursday, May 27, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 104 

^ECTIVE LIVING 02303 HLTH-0310-05 2 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Wednesday, May 12, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Thursday, May 20, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Final Exam: Thursday, May 27, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 103 

jssion II Classes: May 31 ■ July 2 

PERIENCE OF LIT 00480 ENGL-0211-08 3 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Monday, May 31, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 103A 
Mid-term Exam: Wednesday, June 16, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 103B 
Final Exam: Thursday, July 1, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 207 

NTEMPORARY WORLD IN LIT 00498 ENGL-0223-09 3 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Monday, May 31, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 103A 
Mid-term Exam: Wednesday, June 16, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 103A 
Final Exam: Thursday, July 1, 1999, 4:00-6:00 p.m., PH 201 

FECTIVE LIVING 00820 HLTH-0310-08 2 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Monday, May 31, 1999, 6:00-8.00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Wednesday, June 16, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Final Exam: Wednesday, June 30, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 101 

FECTIVE LIVING 00821 HLTH-0310-09 2 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Tuesday, June 1, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Thursday, June 17, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Final Exam: Thursday, July 1, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 102 

ession III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

FECTIVE LIVING 00823 HLTH-0310-10 2 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Wednesday, June 2, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Tuesday, July 6, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Final Exam: Wednesday. August 4, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m.. MC 101 

FECTIVE LIVING 00824 HLTH-0310-11 2 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Thursday, June 3, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 105 
Mid-term Exam: Tuesday, July 6, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 103 
Final Exam: Thursday, August 5, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., MC 100B 

INC OF NUTRITION 02211 N FS-0124-03 3 TBA TBA 

Orientation: Wednesday, June 2, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m.. PH 103A 
Mid-term Exam: Thursday, July 1. 1999. 6:00-8:00 p.m.. PH 103B 
Final Exam: Thursday. August 5. 1999. 6:00-8:00 p.m.. EHS 106 



TBA 



TBA 



SHIPP B 



MAC BETH J 



BARTLEY D 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



CLAYTON M 



SHIPP B 



MACBETH J 



WALKER J 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



NEALS 



NANCE A 



COLSON J 



99 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS 



COMPARATIVE RELIGION 01477 R S-0302-01 3 

Orientation: Wednesday, June 2, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 227 
Mid-term Exam: Tuesday, July 6, 1999. 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 208 
Final Exam: Thursday, August 5, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 212 

Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

CONTEMPORARY WORLD IN LIT 02127 ENGL-0223-14 3 
Orientation: Tuesday, July 6, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 103A 
Mid-term Exam: Monday, July 26, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 207 
Final Exam: Thursday, August 5, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 207 

AMER GOVT & POL 01162 PS-0150-01 3 

Orientation: Tuesday, July 6. 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 227 
Mid-term Review: Thursday, July 15, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 208 
Mid-term Exam: Thursday, July 29, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 103B 
Final Review: Monday, August 2, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m.. PH 220 
Final Exam: Thursday, August 5, 1999, 6:00-8:00 p.m., PH 211 



DAYS TIME 

TBA TBA 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 

TBA JACKSON M 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



TBA 



CLAYTON M 



VILE J 



Video/Data Conference Courses 

Dennis Bain, Kirksey Old Main 122, 898-5426 

Video/data conferencing (VDC) is a technology that compresses audio, video, and data signals sending them 
over ISDN telephone lines from a VDC classroom on the MTSU campus to another VDC classroom in another 
location. From these sites, teachers and students interact through a video camera and speakerphone. They can 
also share data and applications through a specially equipped computer. 



Session V Classes: May 11 - July 2 



SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 

SEM INTH OF PUB FIN 



00389 ECON-0643-01 3 
02308 ECON-0643-02 3 



TR 
TR 



0600PM 0830PM 
0600PM 0830PM 



KOM 126 
FRANKLIN 



GRADDY D 
GRADDY D 



Session 1 Classes: 

Undergraduate 



Evening Classes 

Undergraduate and Graduate 
May 11 -28 



PRINOFACTGI 


00021 


ACTG-0211-02 


3 


MTWR 


0540PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S330 


HARPER B 


WORKSHOP 


00127 


ART-0400-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0400PM 


0800PM 


AB 


105 


RECCHIA M 






\Orf : ART 0400-03 title is 


'Raku." 










ORGANIZATIONAL COMM 


02183 


BMOM-0466-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0910PM 


BAS 


S130A 


STEWARD J 


AMERICAN PEOPLE 


00755 


HlST-0202-03 


3 


MTWR 


0500PM 


0900PM 


PH 


215 


STAFF 


ADV COACH FOOTBALL 


02412 


ATHC-0460-01 


2 


MTWR 


0400PM 


0620PM 


MC 


100B 


FIVEASH T 


EFFECTIVE LIVING 


00816 


HLTH-0310-03 


2 


MTW 


0600PM 


0915PM 


MC 


101 


MAC BETH J 


AEROBIC DANCE 


01206 


PHED-0119-01 


1 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0640PM 


MC 


DS-A 


STAFF 


INTROD SOCIOLOGY 


01643 


SOC-0101-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0940PM 


PH 


319 


STAFF 


UNIV 101 


01974 


UNIV-0101-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0910PM 


BAS 


S343 


ROLLINS M 



100 



IE 

aduate 

IRKSHOP 

GANIZATIONAL COMM 
HL COMUTY RELTNS 
^ & APP OF ED RESEARCH 
JC TESTS & MEASURE 
EP/USE INST MATRLS 
'ERV OF INSTR 
JDIES IN LEADERSHP 
EP/USE INST MATRLS 
JDIES IN LEADERSHI 
VCHING WRITING 
1^ INNOV TRENDS EL 
Ji EARLY CHILDHOOD 
\D EARLY CHLDHD ED 
ERVIEW SPEC ED 
/ COACH FOOTBALL 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



00131 


ART-0500-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0400PM 


0800PM 


AB 


105 


RECCHIAM 




NOTE: ART 0500-03 title is 


'Raku." 










02185 


BMOM-0566-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0910PM 


BAS 


S130A 


STEWARD J 


00653 


FOED-0603-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


160 


PEYTON M 


00657 


FOED-0661-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LIB 


003 


GRIMES P 


00659 


FOED-0663-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LRC 


241 


KEESE N 


00941 


L S-0696-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LIB 


001 


STAFF 


01805 


SPSE-0604-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


158 


HUFFMAN J 


01808 


SPSE-0608-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


162 


EAKER R 


01870 


SPSE-0696-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LIB 


001 


STAFF 


01875 


SPSE-0708-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


162 


EAKER R 


00428 


ELED-0600-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


105 


SOLLEY B 


00434 


ELED-0621-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


PH 


312 


JONES C 


02379 


ELED-0622-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


JH 


138 


GLASCOTT K 


01508 


READ-0676-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


PH 


213 


CREWS N 


01699 


SPED-0602-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0830PM 


KOM 


163 


HIGDON B 


02414 


ATHC-0560-01 


2 


MTWR 


0400PM 


0620PM 


MC 


100B 


FIVEASH T 



ission II Classes: May 31 • July 2 

dergraduate 



N OF ACTG II 


00027 


ACTG-0212-03 


3 


MW 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S260 


HARPER B 


ST ACCOUNTING 


02277 


ACTG-0331-02 


3 


TR 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S260 


JONES H 


'ICS IN PHYS SCI 


01637 


SCI-01 00-04 


4 


MTWR 


0530PM 


0855PM 


DSB 


104 


DEVENDORF G 




NOTE 


Meet time for SCI 0100 sections include lecture and lab. 








^POSITION 


00464 


ENGL-0111-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


305 


LUTZA 


'ERIENCEOFLIT 


00479 


ENGL-0211-07 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


322 


THERRIEN K 


hJTEMPORARY DRAMA AND FILM 00497 


ENGL-0223-08 


3 


TWR 


0500PM 


0800PM 


PH 


308 


BRANTLEY W 


■ AID SAFETY ED 


00830 


HLTH-0330-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0550PM 


0810PM 


AMG 


210 


GINANNI M 




NOTE: HLTH 0330-03 meeti 


May 31 -June 30 inclusive. 








^OBIC DANCE 


01207 


PHED-01 19-02 


1 


MTWR 


0500PM 


0630PM 


MC 


DS-B 


STAFF 


ST AID SAFETY ED 


02311 


PHED-0330-03 


3 


MTWRF 


0550PM 


0810PM 


AMG 


210 


GINANNI M 




NOTE: PHED 0330-03 meets May 31 -June 30 inclusive. 








USTRIAL SAFETY 


00565 


ET-0442-01 


3 


TR 


0430PM 


0840PM 


VIS 


242 


MATH IS M 


>JD COMP INTE MFG 


02250 


ET-0459-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITT R 


N OF MIS 


00893 


INFS-0310-05 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S305 


WYATT J 


5 APPL MICROCOMP 


00897 


INFS-0320-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


CLARK W 


RO TO SYS ANALYSIS 


02217 


INFS-0370-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


CLARK C 


aiSTICAL METH II 


01472 


M-0362-05 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S275 


LEE J 


& LIFE CONTNG 


02226 


ACSI-0450-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


KOM 


221 


BARNWAL R 


LLEGE ALGEBRA 


00982 


MATH-0141-04 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


KOM 


225 


STAFF 


DD & OPERATION SYS 


01042 


MGMT-0362-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S276 


BULLINGTON K 


L HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT 


02394 


MGMT-0462-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S277 


GILBERT J 


V & THE LEGAL SYS 


01164 


P S-0244-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


208 


WHATLEY S 


ROD TO PHILOSOPHY 


01305 


PHIL-0201-02 


3 


MTWR 


0700PM 


0920PM 


PH 


218 


HOODR 



aduate 

^ & APP OF ED RESEARCH 
DB OF EVAL HI ED 



00658 


FOED-0661-02 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


LRC 


00663 


FOED-0752-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


LIB 



241 GRIMES P 

001 WOMACK B 



101 



TITLE 

STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS 

02390 SPSE-0652-04 1 



DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION 



INSTRUCTOR 

STAFF 



R 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-04 is a workshop meeting June 3-4. Title is "Books and Related Activities for Pre-School and Primary Grades. 
STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02391 SPSE-0652-05 1 R 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 STAFF 

F 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-05 is a workshop meeting June 10-11. Title is "Building Attitudes Toward Self and Learning. " 



STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 


02392 


SPSE-0652-06 


1 


R 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S338 


STAFF 










F 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S338 






NOTE: SPSE 0652-06 is a workshop meeting June 


17-18. Title 


is "Storytelli 


"8" 






ADM OF HIGHER ED 


01842 


SPSE-0653-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


KOM 


160 


EMBRY D 


JUNIOR-COMMUNITY COL 


02420 


SPSE-0710-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


KOM 


158 


STAFF 


ADM OF HIGHER ED 


01902 


SPSE-0753-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


KOM 


160 


EMBRY D 


INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 


00570 


ET-0542-01 


3 


TR 


0430PM 


0840PM 


VIS 


242 


MATHIS M 


FUND COMP INTE MFG 


02251 


ET-0559-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITT R 


DESIGN FOR ECON PROD 


02195 


ETIS-0611-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0945PM 


VIS 


115 


MC BRIDE R 


COMPND INT & LIFE CONTNG 


02227 


ACSI-0550-01 


3 


MTWR 


0600PM 


0820PM 


KOM 


221 


BARNWAL R 


BUSINESS POLICY 


00151 


B AD-0698-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S276 


SOKOYA S 


BUS ETHICS 


02156 


MGMT-0675-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S264 


AUSTIN J 



Session III Classes: 

Undergraduate 



May 31 - August 7 



SOIL SURV & LAND USE 


00011 


ABAS-0435-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


SAG 


206 


ANDERSON W 


INTERMEDIATE ACTG 1 


00035 


ACTG-0311-02 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S270 


STAFF 


INTERMEDIATE ACTG II 


00036 


ACTG-0312-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S270 


THOMAS P B 


FEDERAL TAXES II 


00047 


ACTG-0454-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


HAMM J 


AUDITING 1 


00050 


ACTG-0462-01 


3 


M 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


REZAEE Z 


AUDITING II 


00051 


ACTG-0463-01 


3 


R 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S330 


COLVARD R 


LEGAL ENVIRON OF BUS 


00201 


BLAW-0340-03 


3 


M 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S316 


REYNOLDS D 


OFFICE MANAGEMENT 


00211 


BMOM-0301-01 


3 


TR 


0530PM 


0920PM 


BAS 


S324 


SAWYER J 






NOTE: BMOM 0301-01 meets June 8-July 8 inclusive. 








BUS COMMUNICATION 


00214 


BMOM-0351-03 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S343 


PRICE R 


PRIN OF ECONOMICS 


00363 


ECON-0241-03 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S334 


STAFF 


PRIN OF ECONOMICS 


00367 


ECON-0242-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S336 


STAFF 


FIN SYSTEM & ECONOMY 


00371 


ECON-0321-03 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S279 


GRADDY D 


BUS FIN 


00617 


FIN -0301-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


BAS 


S334 


STAFF 


COMPOSITION 


00471 


ENGL-01 12-03 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0820PM 


PH 


300A 


KIRKMAN K 


INDUSTRIAL SEMINAR 


00568 


ET-0471-02 


1 


TR 


0500PM 


0630PM 


SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


METHODS & WORK MEAS 


02196 


ET-0494-01 


3 


TR 


0540PM 


0820PM 


SMYRNA 


WALLS 


NOTE: NURS 0334 sections 1 


2, 3, and 4 are Distance 


Learning 


Telecourses 


taught through Compressed Video. 




For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 








PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


01156 


NURS-0334-01 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


CKNB 


106 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02339 


NURS-0334-02 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


COLUMBIA 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02340 


NURS-0334-03 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


LAWRENCBRG 


DRAUDE B 


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 


02341 


NURS-0334-04 


3 


M 


0430PM 


0830PM 


TULLAHOMA 


DRAUDE B 


RESEARCH 


01157 


NURS-0410-01 


3 


W 


0430PM 


0830PM 


CKNE 


123 


STAFF 


QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 


01176 


PS-0411-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


PH 


320 


WALLACE J 


BASIC STAT FOR BEH S 


01352 


PSY-0302-05 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


313 


VERMILLION V 


SAFETY PSYCHOLOGY 


01387 


PSY-0435-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


313 


VERMILLION V 


QUANTITATIVE METH OF RES 


01656 


SOC-0411-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


PH 


320 


WALLACE J 



102 



TIE 

raduate 

)IL SURV & LAND USE 
■DERAL TAXES II 
JDITING II 

;TG & BUS DECISIONS 
•SEARCH IN BUS/MAR ED 
:AS/EVAL IN BE/ME 

NOTE: 

JA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 
TA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 
JA ANAL & ORG FOR HP 
tC-TECH ED CURR SYS 
;TH0DS of RESEARCH 
lENCE OF COMM 

;dia management 
udies in music 
jiantitative meth of res 
fety psychology 
ioanization skills 
antitative meth of res 



CALL NC 


. COURSE ID 


HRS 


DAYS 


TIME 


LOCATION 


INSTRUCTOR 


00016 


ABAS-0535-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


SAG 


206 


ANDERSON W 


00059 


ACTG-0554-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S301 


HAMM J 


00062 


ACTG-0563-01 


3 


R 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S330 


COLVARD R 


00069 


ACTG-0691-01 


3 


W 


0530PM 


0950PM 


BAS 


S274 


BUSH J 


00226 


BMOM-0662-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


S130A 


LEWIS S 


00227 


BMOM-0672-01 


3 


F 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S315 


MC GREW L 








S 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S315 




BMOM 0672-01 will meet on Fridays 


4:00-8:00 p.m. on June 1 1, June 25, 


and July 


76 




and on Saturdays 8:00 a.m. 


- 5.00 


p.m. on June 12, June 26, and July 17. 






02316 


HLTH-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


02364 


PHED-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


02319 


REC-0670-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0810PM 


MC 


104 


ROWE D 


02194 


VTE-0632-01 


3 


M 


0450PM 


0900PM 


VA 


100 


RICKETTS S 


01983 


VTE-0662-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0930PM 


BAS 


SI 30 A 


LEWIS S 


02280 


M C-0600-01 


3 


W 


0600PM 


0950PM 


COMM 151 


WYATT R 


00946 


M C-0620-01 


3 


T 


0600PM 


0950PM 


COMM 150 


POODE 


02402 


M C-0635-01 


3 


M 


0600PM 


0950PM 


COMM 151 


EASON D 


01184 


PS-0511-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


PH 


320 


WALLACE J 


01418 


PSY-0535-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


313 


VERMILLION W 


02257 


PSY-0637-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0815PM 


PH 


107 


MOFFETT R 


01671 


SOC-0511-01 


3 


T 


0530PM 


0950PM 


PH 


320 


WALLACE J 



ssion IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

idergraduate 



OB IN OFFICE MGMT 
MPOSITION 



00219 
02221 



BMOM-0464-01 
ENGL-0111-04 



TR 
MTWR 



0530PM 
0500PM 



0920PM 
0720PM 



J THEMES IN AM LIT 

•GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 

RRICULUM IN P E 

N OF MIS 

N OF MIS 

\/ANCED PROGRAMMING 

MISTICAL METH I 

MISTICAL METH II 

3INESS POLICY 

In MGMT & ORG BEH 

lERNATIONAL BUS 



N OF MARKETING 
IN OF MARKETING 
IN OF MARKETING 
IN OF MARKETING 
NSUMER BEHAVIOR 
lERNATIONAL BUS 



NOTE: ENCL 0111-04 is a computer-assisted instruction course. 
00489 ENGL-0221-04 3 MTWR 0600PM 0840PM 

02326 PHED-0343-04 2 MTW 0400PM 0550PM 

01232 PHED-0378-04 2 MTW 0600PM 0750PM 

00895 INFS-0310-07 3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 

00896 INFS-0310-08 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 
00904 INFS-0476-01 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 
02219 QM-0261-05 3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 
01474 M-0362-07 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 
00150 B AD-0498-05 3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 
01039 MGMT-0361-07 3 MW 0600PM 1020PM 
02165 MGMT-0471-02 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 

NOTE: MICT0382 sections 6, 7, 8, and 9 are Distance Learning courses taught through 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



02167 
02168 
02170 
02171 
02172 
02174 



MKT-0382-06 
MKT-0382-07 
MKT-0382-08 
MKT-0382-09 
MKT-0391-01 
MKT-0471-02 



TR 

TR 

TR 

TR 

MW 

TR 



0600PM 
0600PM 
0600PM 
0600PM 
0600PM 
0600PM 



1020PM 
1020PM 
1020PM 
1020PM 
1020PM 
1020PM 



BAS S338 
PH 327 

PH 322 
COLUMBIA 
COLUMBIA 
BAS S305 
BAS S305 
BAS S339 
BAS S272 
BAS S272 
BAS S264 
BAS S276 
BAS S262 
compressed video. 

BAS S273 
COLUMBIA 
LAWRENCBRG 
TULLAHOMA 
BAS S332 
BAS 8262 



FORD W 
BROOKHART C 

THERRIEN K 
SCARLETT J 
SCARLETT J 
AGGARWAL R 
JONES C 
MAIER J 
EFFA 
GOBER R 
HART W 
JACOBS G 
MPOYI R 



STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
STAFF 
HILLC 
MPOYI R 



103 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Graduate 



PROBS IN OFF MGT 


00224 


BMOM-0564-01 


3 


TR 


0530PM 


0920PM 


BAS 


S338 


FORDW 


SEMINAR ON FIN MKTS 


00394 


ECON-0646-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S279 


DEPRINCE A 


SEMINAR ON FIN MKTS 


00641 


FIN-0646-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S279 


DEPRINCE A 


STUDIES IN EDUG ADM 


02395 


SPSE-0650-07 


1 


F 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S338 


STAFF 










S 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S338 





NOTE: SPSE 0650-07 is a workshop meeting July 9-10. Title is "Current Legal Issues for Teachers." 

STUDIES IN EDUG CURR 02396 SPSE-0652-10 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 



STAFF 



NOTE: SPSE 0652-10 is a 


workshop 


meeting July 16-17. Title is 


"Search Skill Development and 


Using the 


Vet for Instruction." 


STUDIES IN EDUG CURR 


02397 


SPSE-0652-11 


1 


F 


0400PM 


0800PM 


BAS 


S338 


STAFF 










S 


0800AM 


0500PM 


BAS 


S338 




NOTE: 


SPSE 0652-11 is a workshop meeting August 6-7 


Title is "Creative Thinking Skills." 




ED RES METHODOLOGY 


01874 


SPSE-0701-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


LRC 


241 


CRAIG D 


INST DEV IN HIGH EDU 


01904 


SPSE-0755-01 


3 


MTWR 


0430PM 


0650PM 


KOM 


160 


WILLIAMS J 


PUB POL CONS FAM ISSUES 


02347 


H SC-0652-01 


3 


TWR 


0400PM 


0700PM 


EHS 


109 


STAFF 


GOMP INTE DES & MFG 


02249 


ETIS-0637-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


VIS 


242 


REDDITT R 


ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 


00907 


INFS-0576-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


MAIER J 


SEM IN GLOBAL INFS 


00910 


INFS-0675-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S339 


HUGHES C 


BUSINESS POLICY 


00152 


B AD-0698-02 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S276 


MULLANE J 


OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 


02166 


MGMT-0665-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


1020PM 


BAS 


S277 


STAFF 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

Undergraduate 



PRIN OF ACTG 1 


02295 


AGTG-0211-05 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0830PM 


BAS 


S316 


HARPER P 


DECISION SCI TECH 


01475 


M-0401-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS 


S272 


FREEMAN G 



Graduate 

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 

NOTE: ECON 0643 



00388 ECON-0600-01 3 MW 0600PM 0830PM BAS S279 FAYISSA B 

sections 1 and 2 are Distance Learning courses taught through Video Data Conference. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 



SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 


00389 


ECON-0643-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0830PM 


KOM 126 


GRADDY D 




SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 


02308 


ECON-0643-02 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0830PM 


FRANKLIN 


GRADDY D 




INT'L FIN MGMT 


02406 


FIN-0686-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0830PM 


BAS S341 


STAFF 




INFS MGMT & APPL 


00908 


INFS-0661-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S305 


GAMBILL S 


3 


INFORMATION SYSTEMS PRACT 


00911 


INFS-0698-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S278 


CLARK W 




QUAN METH SURVEY 


01476 


Q M-0600-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S275 


ADAMS C 


s 


NOTE: MATH 0690 sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 are 


Distanct 


Learning 


courses taught through 


compressed video 




i 




For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section 


on page 97. 






RESEARCH IN MATH ED 


02407 


MATH-0690-01 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


KOM 122 


ASPINWALL L 


5 


RESEARCH IN MATH ED 


02408 


MATH-0690-02 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


COLUMBIA 


ASPINWALL L 


S 


RESEARCH IN MATH ED 


02409 


MATH-0690-03 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


TULLAHOMA 


ASPINWALL L 


K 


RESEARCH IN MATH ED 


02410 


MATH -0690-04 


3 


T 


0400PM 


0750PM 


LAWRENGBRG 


ASPINWALL L 


'A 


STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONS 


01063 


MGMT-0660-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S264 


SINGER M 




MARKETING MANAGEMENT 


01093 


MKT-0680-01 


3 


MW 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S262 


WARREN W 




MARKET BEHAVIOR 


01094 


MKT-0682-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0840PM 


BAS S262 


MOSER R 


C 



104 1 





CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Off-Campus 

Undergraduate and Graduate 

Dianna Zeh, Peck Hall 1 01 D, 898-561 1 

NOTE: Register for off<ampus classes by TRAM or WebMT. 
A $25 late fee will be charged if registration is on or after the first day of class. 

Unless otherwise noted: 

LaVergne classes will be held at Bridgestone. Spring Hill classes will be held at Saturn. 

Smyrna classes will be held at Nissan. Columbia classes will be held at Columbia State Community College. 

Franklin classes will be held at Centennial High School. Shelbyville classes will be held at the 

Tennessee Technology Center. Gallatin classes will be held at Volunteer State Community College. 

Clifton classes will be held at the CSCC site in Clifton. Lebanon classes will be held at SouthSide Elementary. 

Dickson classes will be held at the Dickson County High School, Vocational Building. 

ssion I Classes: May 11 -May 28 

dergraduate 

H& MAT ELL ARTS 02366 ELED-311A-02 3 MTWR 0900AM 0100PM COLUMBIA GOWER D 

NOTE: MATH 0401 sections 02, 03, and 04 are Distance Learning courses taught through compressed video. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

H FOR MID SCH TEACH 01003 MATH-0401-02 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

H FOR MID SCH TEACH 01004 MATH-0401-03 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 

H FOR MID SCH TEACH 01005 MATH-0401-04 3 MTWRF 0930AM 1230PM LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 

ssion II Classes: May 31 - July 2 

dergraduate 



SCI FOR ELEM TCHGS 


00170 


BIOL-0300-03 


4 


MTWR 


0200PM 


0630PM 


COLUMBIA 


RUTLEDGE M 


H MAT TCH READ 


02372 


READ-0425-02 


4 


MTWR 


TBA 




COLUMBIA 


STAFF 


COMPOSITION 


00511 


ENGL-0350-02 


3 


TWR 


1000AM 


0100PM 


COLUMBIA 


KINGR 


D COMP INTE MFG 


02250 


ET-0459-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITT R 


iduate 


















H MAT TCH READ 


01505 


READ-0525-02 


4 


MTWR 


TBA 




COLUMBIA 


STAFF 


D COMP INTE MFG 


02251 


ET-0559-01 


3 


TR 


0600PM 


0945PM 


SHELBYVILLE 


REDDITT R 



ssion III Classes: May 31- August 7 

lergraduate 



ISTRIAL SEMINAR 


00567 


ET-0471-01 


1 


TR 


0230PM 


0400PM 


SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


ISTRIAL SEMINAR 


00568 


ET-0471-02 


1 


TR 


0500PM 


0630PM 


SPRING HILL 


HELM J 


HODS & WORK MEAS 


02196 


ET-0494-01 


3 


TR 


0540PM 


0820PM 


SMYRNA 


WALL B 


:/MECH ENGR TECH 


00573 


ET-480E-04 


3 


TBA 


TBA 




SPRING HILL 


HELM J 



NOTE: NURS 0334 sections 02, 03, and 04 are Distance Learning Telecourses taught through compressed video. 
For details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 

10PHYSIOLOGY 02339 NURS-0334-02 3 M 0430PM 0830PM COLUMBIA DRAUDE 8 

10PHYSI0L0GY 02340 NURS-0334-03 3 M 0430PM 0830PM LAWRENCBRG DRAUDE B 

HOPHYSIOLOGY 02341 NURS-0334-04 3 M 0430PM 0830PM TULLAHOMA DRAUDE B 



105 



TITLE 



CALL NO. COURSE ID HRS DAYS 



TIME 



LOCATION INSTRUCTOR 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Undergraduate 



SURVEY OF EXC CHILD 


01696 SPED-0301-04 3 MTWR 1010AM 1230PM 


COLUMBIA 


MORICE H 


GA-GYM-RHYM ACT CHILDREN 


02326 PHED-0343-04 2 MTW 0400PM 0550PM 


COLUMBIA 


SCARLETT J 


CURRICULUM IN P E 


01232 PHED-0378-04 2 MTW 0600PM 0750PM 


COLUMBIA 


SCARLETT J 


NOTE: MKT 0382 sections 07, 08 and 09 are Distance Learning courses taught through 


compressed video 






for more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 






PRIN OF MARKETING 


02168 MKT -0382-07 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 


COLUMBIA 


STAFF 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


02170 MKT -0382-08 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 


LAWRENCBRG 


STAFF 


PRIN OF MARKETING 


02171 MKT -0382-09 3 TR 0600PM 1020PM 


TULLAHOMA 


STAFF 



Session V Classes: May 1 1 - July 2 

Graduate 



SEM IN TH OF PUB FIN 02308 ECON-0643-02 3 TR 0600PM 0830PM FRANKLIN GRADDY D 

NOTE: ECON 0643-02 is a Distance Learning course taught through Video Data Conference. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
NOTE: MATH 0690 sections 02, 03, and 04 are Distance Learning courses taught through compressed video. 
For more details, refer to the Distance Learning section on page 97. 
RESEARCH IN MATH ED 02408 MATH-0690-02 3 T 0400PM 0750PM COLUMBIA ASPINWALL L 

RESEARCH IN MATH ED 02409 MATH-0690-03 3 T 0400PM 0750PM TULLAHOMA ASPINWALL L 

RESEARCH IN MATH ED 02410 MATH-0690-04 3 T 0400PM 0750PM LAWRENCBRG ASPINWALL L 



Saturday Classes 

Graduate 



Session III Classes: May 31 - August 7 

Graduate 

MEAS/EVAL IN BE/ME 00227 BMOM-0672-01 3 



0400PM 
0800AM 



0800PM 
0500PM 



BAS S3 15 
BAS S3 15 



MC GREW L 



NOTE: BMOM 0672-01 will meet on Fridays 4:00-8:00 p.m. on June 1 1, June 25, and July 16 
and on Saturdays 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on June 12, June 26, and July 17. 



Session IV Classes: July 6 - August 7 

Graduate 



STUDIES IN EDUC ADM 



02395 SPSE-0650-07 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS 8338 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0650-07 is a workshop meeting July 9-10. Title is "Current Legal Issues for Teachers. " 



STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 



STAFF 



STAFF 



02396 SPSE-0652-10 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: SPSE 0652-10 is a workshop meeting July 16-17. Title is "Search Skill Development and Using the Net for Instruction.' 
STUDIES IN EDUC CURR 02397 SPSE-0652-11 1 F 0400PM 0800PM BAS S338 STAFF 

S 0800AM 0500PM BAS S338 

NOTE: Sf^E 0652-1 1 is a workshop meeting August 6-7. Tide is "Creative Thinking Skills. " 



106 



3rug-Free Schools and Communities Act 



he following information is presented in compliance with 
he Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment 
if 1989. 

. Middle Tennessee State University prohibits the pos- 
session, use, or distribution of illegal drugs and alco- 
hol on the campus proper or on institutionally-owned, 
leased, or otherwise controlled property. 

. Various federal and state statutes make it unlawful to 
manufacture, distribute, dispense, deliver or sell, or 
possess with intent to manufacture, distribute, dis- 
pense, deliver or sell, controlled substances. The pen- 
alty imposed depends upon many factors which in- 
clude the type and amount of controlled substance 
involved, the number of prior offenses, if any, and 
whether any other crimes were committed in connec- 

] tion with the use of the controlled substance. Possible 
sanctions include incarceration up to and including 
life imprisonment and imposition of substantial mon- 
etary fines. 

Tennessee statutes provide that it is unlawful for any 
person under the age of twenty-one (21 ) to buy, pos- 
sess, transport (unless in the course of employment), 
or consume alcoholic beverages, wine, or beer, such 
offense being classified a Class A misdemeanor pun- 
ishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 1 months, 
29 days, or a fine of not more than $2500, or both. 
The receipt, possession, or transportation of alcoholic 
beverages without the required revenue stamp is also 
a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment of not 
more than thirty (30) days or a fine of not more than 
$50, or both. 

The use of alcohol can lead to serious health risks: 

• loss of muscle control, poor coordination, slurred 
speech; 

• fatigue, nausea, headache; 

• increased likelihood of accidents; 

• impaired judgment; 

• possible respiratory paralysis and death. 

Heavy drinking can lead to: 

• alcoholism; 

• damage to brain cells; 

• increased risk of cirrhosis, ulcers, heart disease, 
heart attack, and cancers of liver, mouth, throat, 
and stomach; 

• hallucinations; 

• personality disorders. 



Health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs 
include: 

• increased susceptibility to disease due to a less effi- 
cient immune system; 

• increased likelihood of accidents; 

• personality disorders; 

• addiction; 

• death by overdose; 

• anemia; 

• poor concentration. 

Additional information about how use of drugs and/ 
or alcohol affect your health is available at McFarland 
Health Services Center and in the Alcohol Informa- 
tion Center in Keathley University Center. 

4. Middle Tennessee State University does not currently 
provide drug/alcohol counseling, treatment, or reha- 
bilitation programs for students. Referral to commu- 
nity treatment facilities may be made in appropriate 
cases. 

5. Middle Tennessee State University will impose sanc- 
tions against individuals who are determined to have 
violated rules prohibiting the use, possession, or distri- 
bution of illegal drugs or alcohol. 

Sanctions for students using or possessing illegal drugs 
or alcohol include disciplinary probation, and in ap- 
propriate cases, suspension from the University. In 
addition, residence hall students will be removed from 
the housing system for the use or possession of illegal 
drugs. Referral for criminal prosecution may be made 
in appropriate cases. 

Individuals involved in the sale or distribution of ille- 
gal drugs will be suspended from the University and 
referred to the appropriate authorities for criminal 
prosecution. 

All employees, including students, agree as a condi- 
tion of employment to abide by this policy Sanctions 
against empbyees for use or possession of illegal drugs 
or alcohol in the workplace include termination of 
employment. Additionally, employees are required to 
notify the institution of any drug convictions resulting 
from a violation in the workplace no later than five 
days after the conviction. 



107 



Use this form to sign up for direct deposit! 

Ai ^tis\h\ Authorization for Automatic Deposit 

Middle Tennessee State University • Murfreesboro, Tennessee 



□ New n Change □ Cancel 

I hereby authorize: 

1 ) Middle Tennessee State University to deposit my refund via electronic fund transfer (EFT); 

2) my financial institution to credit this amount to my account. 
This authorization will remain in effect unless canceled in writing. A new authorization must be completed if I change n 
account, close my account, or change financial institutions. Note: I understand that the University needs ten (10) bus 
ness days to set up this authorization, and two (2) business days for EFT after funds become available. 

In the event that the exercise of this authorization for any reason results in an overpayment of financial aid actually di 
and payable to me, I hereby authorize the University to either: a) withhold a sum equal to the overpayment from my ne 
disbursement of financial aid, or b) debit my above-identified checking or savings account for an amount not to exce« 
said overpayment. I understand that I may be subject to a financial aid billing which I must repay to MTSU if I withdraw 
do not enroll in a subsequent term and have received financial aid via EFT which is in excess of my financial aid eligibili 
or if an overaward occurs. If any action taken by me, without adequate notification to the Business Office, results in no 
acceptance of the transfer by my financial institution, I understand that the University assumes no responsibility f 
processing supplemental financial aids until the funds are returned to the University by my financial institution. 



Name of bank or credit union (branch, if any) 

Address of bank or credit union 

City, state, zip 

Signature ^ 



Social Sec. No. Date 

Name (please print) - — 



Address (please print) . 

Home phone Work phone 

Checking account no . or Savings account no ^ 

Bank or credit union routing no (between these symbols |: |: on the bottom left of your check) 



Mail or bring to 

Cope Administration BIdg., Room 103 
Business Office Student Loans 
Middle Tennessee State University 
Murfreesboro, TN 37132 



108 



Course Qelecfion Worksheef 



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ludentiD DDD nn DDDD 

irth month and day: I I I I LJ I I 

)R 

ersonal Access Code: LJ LJ LJ LJ 

'his can be any number; you will use this code each time you access TRAM or WebMT; you must remember the code.) 

ccess the registration system at your assigned time; you will be guided through the registration process. 

TRAM Main Menu Options WebMT Registration Menu Options 

(615) 898-2000 (On campus: 9-898-2000) http://www.mtsu.edu 

I 1. Registration Menu • Registration/Drop/Add 

2. Grade Inquiry • Registration Holds 

3. Fee Payment/Confirmation Menu • Class Schedule 

4. Financial Aid Inquiry (entrance interview) • Course Offerings 
9. End Call • Change Personal Access Code 

• Exit System 

OTE: If you change your schedule, be sure to enter all drops and adds on the same day. This will save having to pay 
Iditional registration fees and help avoid confusion. 

Prepare Schedule Below 

ample: 

Call Number Course ID Hours Days Time 

00470 ENGL-01 12-02 3 MW 10:10-12:30 



Alternate Courses 



109 



WebMT Menu Opiions 

http://www.mtsu.eclu 



Regisfration/Drop/Add 
Regisfrafion Hold 
Class Qchedule 
Course OfFerings 



• Change Personal Access Code 

• Account Balance/ 
Confirm You Will Attend 

• OIgn Off and Exit 



TRAM Main Menu 

(615) 898-2000 • On Campus: 9-898-2000 



1 - Regisfraflon 

2 - Grade Inquiry 

3 - Fee Paymenf/Confirm You Will Attend 

4 - Rnancial Aid Inquiry 

(1 - Enfrance Interview - Requirement for first-time and transfer 
QtafFord and Direct Loan borrowers) 

9 - End Call 

TRAM Menus 

1 -Registration 3 - Fee Payment/Confirmation 



1 • Register for Classes 

You will be asked to enter the 5-digit call number for 
each class. 

Press * when your schedule is completed. 



2 - Drop or Add a Class 



3 - Fee Payment/Confirmation Menu 

This takes you to the menu at right. 



4 - Check Course Status 



5 - List Classes 



6 - Audit a Class 



9 - Exit Registration System 



1 - Confirm You Will Attend 

If your registration balance is zero or credit, call TRAM 
to confirm you will attend MTSU this term. 



2 - Determine Your Account Balance 



3 - Pay Fees with Credit Card/Check Card 



4 - Fee Methods and Deadlines 



5 - Refund Deadlines 



6 - Registration Fee Rates 



7 • Drop/Add Fee Information 



9 - Exit Fee Payment System 



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Graduate Catalog 



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statement of Mission 




Middle Tennessee State 
University, an emerging 
major institution of higher 
education in the state, re- 
gion, and nation, is a 
member of the State Uni- 
versity and Community 
College System of Tennes- 
see and is governed by the 
Tennessee Board of Re- 
gents. As a comprehensive 
university, it offers an extensive range of programs pri- 
marily serving students of central Tennessee while also 
attracting students nationally and internationally. The 
University provides quality educational programs in a 
supportive campus environment. An increasing empha- 
sis on scholarship reflects a commitment to research 
and public service, activities which expand human 
knowledge and enhance the quality of life. 

The University assists its students in becoming educated 
men and women. Those who avail themselves of the 
educational opportunities provided will: 

1 . broaden their interests and develop inquiring minds; 

2. develop practices of observation and reading through 
exposure and exploration of scientific knowledge, cul- 
tural heritage, and the changing contemporary world; 

3. think logically, critically and imaginatively; 

4. communicate effectively; 

5. make sound judgments and choose wisely among ethi- 
cal, moral, and aesthetic values; 

6. recognize the significance of maintaining physical and 
mental well-being; 

7. acquire a basic understanding of a discipline or a group 
of related disciplines; and 

8. participate actively in their communities by seeking and 
sharing knowledge, expertise, and creative undertakings. 

Accordingly, the University will: 

1 . provide student support services that create a campus 
environment conducive to learning and personal devel- 
opment; 

2. recruit quality faculty and maintain support services to 
assist faculty in instruction; 

3. provide resources to encourage research and public serv- 
ice; 

4. develop private sector, alumni, and public support for all 
aspects of the University; and 

5. allocate financial and physical resources to accomplish 
the mission. 

The University offers, through five colleges and thirty- 
six academic departments, baccalaureate instruction in 



the liberal and fine arts, the sciences, education, busi- 
ness, communication, and a variety of other fields. Stu- 
dents pursuing bachelor's degrees complete a general 
studies program designed to provide them with expo- 
sure to the cultural legacy of the past and to the charac- 
teristics of a changing contemporary world, along with 
the skills needed to pursue major and minor programs 
of study. A University Honors College and a Presiden- 
tial Scholarship Program attract students with excep- 
tional academic records seeking added intellectual chal- 
lenges, while the Developmental Studies Program 
strengthens fundamental academic skills. 

Although the University's emphasis is on undergradu- 
ate instruction, its graduate offerings are varied and vi- 
tal to its mission. Programs of the College of Graduate 
Studies are offered at the master's, specialist, and doc- 
toral levels. The Doctor of Arts degree prepares students 
for careers in undergraduate college teaching. Nearly 
thirty master's programs are offered, the largest ones in 
business administration, education, and psychology. The 
institution anticipates continuing to expand its unique 
programs and associated activities such as those in aero- 
space and mass communication. 

Enrollment has grown dramatically over the past few 
years, a pattern predicted to continue as academic pro- 
gramming is enhanced and the population of the re- 
gion increases. The majority of students attend full time 
and commute to campus. The student body includes 
adult learners as well as persons of traditional college 
age. The University greatly values cultural diversity and 
actively promotes environments conducive to success 
for all students and employees. 

The University recruits nationally for talented and dedi- 
cated faculty members committed to teaching and pro- 
fessional service. Several endowed chairs provide spe- 
cial opportunities for bringing faculty of exceptional 
reputation to the campus. Research and public service 
activities take a great variety of forms, including con- 
tinuing education programming and matching the ex- 
pertise of the faculty with the evolving needs of the 
public. The Center for Historic Preservation and the 
Center for Popular Music, specially funded centers with 
national reputations for excellence, enrich graduate and 
undergraduate instruction, research, and outreach pro- 
grams. Student support services, as well as cultural and 
athletic programs, offer activities designed to comple- 
ment the academic program while strengthening the 
development of the individual student. 



Table of Contents 



Calendar 


4 


Departments and Degree Programs 


45 


Directory for Correspondence 
Administrative Officers, THEC, 


6 


Accounting 
Aerospace 

Agribusiness and Agriscience 
Art 

Biology 

Business Administration 
Business Education, Marketing Education, 
and Office Management 


46 
48 
51 
52 
53 
56 

57 


Tennessee Board of Regents 
Accrediting Agencies and Memberships 


7 
7 


The Graduate Council 


8 


Academic and Student Services 
International Programs and Services 
Continuing Studies and Public Service 


9 
14 
15 


College of Graduate Studies 


17 


Chemistry 

Computer Information Systems 


59 
62 


Graduate Student Bill of Rights 




Computer Science 


64 


and Responsibilities 


18 


Criminal Justice Administration 


66 


Graduate Minors 


19 


Economics and Finance 


68 


Graduate Majors Available 


20 


Educational Leadership 


73 


Glossary of Terms 


22 


Elementary and Special Education 


79 


Admission to the College of Graduate Studies 


24 


Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 


85 


Expenses 


27 


English 


89 


Refund of Fees 


30 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 


92 


Financial Aid 


31 


Geography and Geology 


95 


Assistantships and Fellowships 


31 


Health, Physical Education, 




Academic Regulations 


32 


Recreation, and Safety 


97 


Student Access to Educational Records 


36 


History 


104 






Human Sciences 


110 






Management and Marketing 


113 


Graduate Programs 


37 


Mass Communication 


115 


Doctor of Arts 


38 


Mathematical Sciences 


117 


Programs Leading to the D.A. Degree 
Qualifying Examinations 
Dissertation Information 


38 
39 


Music 

Physics and Astronomy 


121 
125 


39 


Political Science 


125 


General Information for Specialist's 
and Master's Students 




Psychology 


127 


41 


Sociology and Anthropology 


137 


Admission Requirements 
Advancement to Candidacy 


41 
41 


Speech and Theatre 
Vocational-Technical Education 


140 
142 


Candidacy Change 


41 






Comprehensive Examinations 


41 


The Graduate Faculty 


144 


Faculty Advisors 


41 






Intent to Graduate 


41 


Index 


159 


Thesis 


41 






Specialist in Education Degree 


42 


Application for Admission in 


back 


The Master's Program 


42 






Common Requirements 


42 


Application for Graduate Assistantship in 


back 


The Master of Arts 


42 






The Master of Arts in Teaching 


42 


Campus Map inside back 


cover 


The Master of Business Administration 


43 






The Master of Business Education 


43 






The Master of Criminal Justice 


43 






The Master of Education 


43 
43 






The Master of Science 


PLEASE NOTE: 




The Master of Science in Teaching 


43 






The Master of Vocational-Technical Education 


43 


For application for admission. 




Second Master's Degree from MTSU 
Academic Abbreviations 


43 
44 


turn to the back of the catalog. 





The University Calendar, 1999-2001 

Calendar subject to change as conditions may require. 

Please see class schedule book each semester for registration, fee payment, drop/add, and other important 
dates. 

Contact the Counseling and Testing Center for dates and times for all entrance exams except for the Graduate 
Management Admissions Test (GMAT) which will be given at the Sylvan Technology Centers. 



Fall Semester 1999 



Summer Sessions li, III, and IV 2000 



August 23 


Classes begin 


September 6 


Labor Day Holiday - no classes 


September 7 


Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 




December 1999 


October 11-15 


Mid-semester 


October 21-23 


Fall Break - no classes 


October 22 


Last day for filing theses and dissertations 




in Graduate Office for December gradu- 




ation 


October 30 


Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 




to begin 


November 6 


Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 




hensive exams begin 


November 25-27 


Thanksgiving Holidays - no classes 


December 11-17 


Final examinations 


December 1 


Last day to remove "1" grades for those 




who plan to graduate in December 


December 18 


Commencement 


Spring Semester 2000 


January 10 


Classes begin 


January 17 


Martin Luther King Holiday - no classes 


January 24 


Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 




May 2000 


Feb. 28-March 4 


Mid-semester 


March 24 


Last day for filing theses and dissertations 




in Graduate Office for May graduation 


March 27-April 1 


Spring Break 


April 1 


Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 




begin 


April 8 


Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 




hensive exams begin 


April 21 


Holiday - no classes 


May 3-9 


Final examinations 


Mays 


Last day to remove "1" grades for those 



May 13 



who plan to graduate in May 
Commencement 



Summer Session I 2000 



June 5 


Classes begin for Sessions II and III 


June 6 


Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 




August 2000 


June 16 


Last day for filing theses and dissertations 




in Graduate Office for August graduation 


Julyl 


Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 




begin 


July 4 


Independence Day Holiday - no classes 


July 6 


Final examinations, Session II 


Julys 


Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 




hensive exams begin 


July 10 


Classes begin, Session IV 


August 4 


Last day to remove "1" grades for those 




who plan to graduate in August 


August 1 


Final examinations. Sessions III and IV; 




classes meeting M-Th 


August 1 1 


Final examinations, Sessions III and IV; 




classes meeting M-F 


August 12 


Commencement 


Fall Semester 2000 


August 21 


Classes begin 


September 4 


Labor Day Holiday - no classes 


September 5 


Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 




December 2000 


October 9-1 4 


Mid-semester 


October 19-21 


Fall Break - no classes 


October 20 


Last day for filing theses and dissertations 




in Graduate Office for December gradu- 




ation 


October 21 


Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 




begin 


October 28 


Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 




hensive exams begin 


November 23-25 


Thanksgiving Holidays - no classes 


December 8 


Last day to remove "1" grades for those 




who plan to graduate in December 


December 9-1 5 


Final Examinations 


December 1 6 


Commencement 



May 16 
June 2 



Classes begin 

Final Examinations, Session I 



Spring Semester 2001 



Summer Sessions II, III, IV 2001 



January 8 


Classes begin 


June 4 


January 15 


Martin Luther King Holiday - no classes 


June 5 


January 22 


Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 






May 2001 


June 15 


March 4-9 


Mid-semester 




March 26-31 


Spring Break 


July 4 


March 30 


Last day for filing theses and dissertations 


July 5-6 




in Graduate Office for May graduation 


July? 


March 31 


Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 






begin 


July 9 


April 7 


Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 
hensive exams begin 


July 14 


April 13 


Holiday - no classes 


August 3 


May 2-8 


Final Examinations 




May 4 


Last day to remove "1" grades for those 
who plan to graduate in May 


August 9 


May 12 
Qiimmop Coc 


Commencement 
•.cinn 1 9001 


August 1 
August 1 1 



Classes begin for Sessions II and III 
Deadline for filing Intent to Graduate for 
August 2001 

Last day for filing theses and dissertations 
in Graduate Office for August graduation 
Independence Day Holiday - no classes 
Final examinations, Session II 
Written Doctor of Arts qualifying exams 
begin 

Classes begin, Session IV 
Written Master's and Specialist's compre- 
hensive exams begin 
Last day to remove "I" grades for those 
who plan to graduate in August 
Final examinations, Sessions III and IV; 
classes meeting M-Th 
Final examinations, Sessions III and IV; 
classes meeting M-F 
Commencement 



May 14 
June 1 



Classes begin 

Final examinations, Session I 



Fall Semester 2001 

August 22 Classes begin 




Middle Tennessee State University is a member of the Tennessee Board of Regents system, the seventh largest system of higher education in the nation. 
The Tennessee Board of Regents is the governing board for this system which comprises six universities, fourteen community colleges, and twenty-six 
area technology centers. The TBR system enrolls more than 80 percent of all Tennessee students attending public institutions of higher education. 

Middle Tennessee State University in its educational programs and activities involving students and employees, does not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, or age. Furthermore, the University does not discriminate against veterans or individuals with disabilities. 

^WJaS* -^01 1-799 Printed on recycled paper 



Directory for Correspondence 



The course offerings and requirements of Middle Ten- 
nessee State University are continually under exannina- 
tion and revision. This catalog presents the offerings and 
requirements in effect at the time of publication, but 
there is no guarantee that they will not be changed or 
revoked. This catalog is not intended to state contrac- 
tual terms and does not constitute a contract between 
the student and the institution. 

Middle Tennessee State University reserves the right to 
make changes as required in course offerings, curricula, 
academic policies, and other rules and regulations af- 
fecting students to be effective whenever determined 
by the institution. These changes will govern current 
and formerly enrolled students. Enrollment of all stu- 
dents is subject to these conditions. 

The institution does not warrant or represent that any 
student who completes a course or program of study 
will necessarily acquire any specific skills or knowledge 
or will be able to successfully pass or complete any spe- 
cific examination for any course, degree, or license. 

Current information may be obtained by calling or writ- 
ing the following sources: 

General Inquiries Campus Operator 

(615)898-2300 

Admissions, Graduate 898-2840 

Admissions, Undergraduate 898-21 1 1 

Adult students Adult Services Center 

898-5989 

Coop students Cooperative Education 

898-2225 

Disabled students Disabled Student 

Services 898-2783 

Distance learning Continuing Studies 

898-5611/2177 

Fees Business Office 

898-2761 

Financial assistance Financial Aid 

898-2830 

General acadennic policies Academic Affairs 

898-2880 

Graduate College Graduate Office 

898-2840 

Dean 898-5897 

Associate Dean 898-2840 



Graduate Studies 

Select the number corresponding to your program of study: 
Accounting, Business Education, Economics and Finance, 
Management and Marketing, Computer Information 

Systems, Computer Science 898-2843 

Biology, Chemistry, Engineering Technology and 
Industrial Studies, Mathematical Sciences, 
Vocational-Technical Education, Foreign Languages, 

History, Music, Sociology 898-5494 

Criminal Justice, HPERS, Human Sciences, 

Psychology 898-5352 

Aerospace Education, Aviation Administration, 
Elementary and Special Education, Educational Leadership, 

English, Mass Communication 898-2195 

Non-degree seeking 898-2840 

Housing reservations Housing and Residential Life 

898-2971 

International students International Programs 

and Services 898-2238 

Library resources University Library 

898-2772 

Majors and course offerings Department 

offering program 

Minority or 

multicultural affairs Multicultural Affairs 

898-2987 

Night classes Continuing Studies 

898-5611 

Off-campus classes Continuing Studies 

898-2177 

Parking regulations Parking Services 

898-2850 

Re-enrollment requirements Graduate Admissions 

898-2840 

Registration Scheduling Center 

898-5800 

Student life, activities Student Affairs 

898-2440 

Teacher licensure Teacher Licensing Office 

898-2874 

Testing arrangements Counseling and 

Testing Center 898-2670 

Transcripts Records Office 

898-2600 

Veterans Records Office 

898-2601 

Women's issues Women's Center 

898-2193 



Middle Tennessee State University • Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132 
MTSU home page address: http://vvww.mtsu.edu/~graduate/ 



Administrative Officers 



University 

President 

James E. Walker, Ed.D. 
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Barbara S. Haskew, Ph.D. 
Vice President for Development and University Relations 

Linda P Hare, Ed.D. 
Vice President for Finance and Administration 

Duane Stucky, Ph.D. 
Vice President for Student Affairs 

Robert Kyle Glenn, Ph.D. 
Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management 

Cliff Gillespie, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Graduate Studies 

Donald L. Curry, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Basic and Applied Sciences 

Earl E. Keese, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Business 

E. James Burton, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Education 

Gloria L. Bonner, Ed.D. 
Dean, College of Liberal Arts 

John N. McDaniel, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Mass Communication 

Deryl R. Learning, Ph.D. 
Dean, College of University Honors 

John Paul Montgomery, Ph.D. 
Dean, Division of Continuing Studies and Public Service 

Rosemary W. Owens, Ed.D. 
Dean, University Library 

Don Craig, M.L.S. 



The Tennessee Higher Education Commission 

Steve Adams, State Treasurer, Nashville 

Riley C. Darnell, Secretary of State, Nashville 

Tony Scott England, Kingsport 

William Ransom Jones, Murfreesboro 

Dale Kelley, Huntingdon 

Debby Patterson Koch, Secretary, Nashville 

Joe Lancaster, Columbia 

Wanda McMahan, Vice-Chair, Knoxville 

Reed "Skip" Pond, Chattanooga 

June Scobee Rodgers, Signal Mtn. 

J.V. Sailors, Executive Director, State Board of Education 

(ex-officio) 
William R. Snodgrass, Comptroller; Vice-Chair, Nashville 
Lisa R Verble, Sevierville 
A.C. Wharton, Jr., Chair, Memphis 

The Tennessee Board of Regents 

Don Sundquist, Governor of Tennessee, Chair, Nashville 

Demetra Codsey Boyd, Clarksville 

Robert Jack Fishman, Morristown 

Robert L. "Bud" Gamble, Chattanooga 

Douglas W. Hodge, Dyersburg 

Clifford H. "Bo" Henry, Maryville 

Ed Jernigan, Nashville 

Jane C. Kisber, Jackson 

W. Keith McCord, Knoxville 

Leslie Parks Pope, Johnson City 

Richard G. Rhoda, Executive Director, THEC, Nashville (ex-officio) 

J. Stanley Rogers, Manchester 

Debora J. Seivers, Columbia 

Maxine A. Smith, Memphis 

Jane Walters, Commissioner of Education, Nashville (ex-officio) 

Nancy Washington, Clarksville 

William H. Watkins, Jr., Memphis 

Dan Wheeler, Commissioner of Agriculture, Nashville (ex-officio) 



Accrediting Agencies and Memberships 



AACSB - The International Association for Management Education 

Accrediting Council of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Council on Education 

Association of State Colleges and Universities 

Conference of Southern Graduate Schools 

Council of Applied Masters Programs in Psychology 

Council of Graduate Schools in the United States 

National Association for Sport and Physical Education 

National Association of Industrial Technology 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Tennessee College Association 

Teachers College Association of Extension and Field Services 

Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools 



The Graduate Council 



Graduate Council Mission Statement 

The Graduate Council plays a crucial role in the over- 
sight and planning of all MTSU graduate courses and 
graduate degree programs, in establishing criteria for 
the appointment and reappointment of Graduate Fac- 
ulty, in assessing graduate student issues and concerns, 
and in recommending to the dean of the College of 
Graduate Studies university-wide policies and proce- 
dures for implementation. The Graduate Council ad- 
vises in the modification of existing programs and in 
the approval and implementation of any new programs. 
All student work towards advanced degrees proceeds 
under policies and regulations established and reviewed 
by academic departments, the Graduate Council, and 
the College of Graduate Studies. 

The Graduate Council provides leadership in the pur- 
suit of excellence in scholarly activity and serves as an 
advocate in obtaining resources for graduate programs. 



Only full-time MTSU faculty who have previously been 
appointed to the Graduate Faculty may serve on the 
Graduate Council. Council members are appointed by 
the president to serve three-year terms with three repre- 
sentatives per college. Two graduate student representa- 
tives who meet all graduate academic standards are also 
appointed. To ensure continuity and institutional 
memory in the creation and implementation of poli- 
cies and procedures, one third of the Council members 
rotate off each year and are replaced by five new fac- 
ulty members representing each college. Graduate stu- 
dents are appointed to the Council each academic year, 
and the graduate college dean and the six academic 
deans serve as ex-officio members. The vice chair, who 
conducts meetings in the absence of the chair and who 
serves as chair-elect, and the recording secretary of the 
Graduate Council are elected annually. The chair, in 
consultation with the dean of the College of Graduate 
Studies, Is responsible for setting the Council's agenda. 



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Academic and Student Services 



Middle Tennessee State University has a large and beau- 
tifully landscaped campus of approximately 500 acres 
and 112 permanent buildings totaling over 3 million 
square feet. Campus buildings are shown on a map 
printed in this catalog. 



Adult Services Center 

The Adult Services Center serves as an information and refer- 
ral center for adult learners, including graduate students. The 
Center is also an advocate for the needs of adult learners. 
Located in Keathley University Center 320, the Center helps 
make available the services of various other university offices 
to students on campus for classes at hours other than regular 
business hours. Students may pick up a variety of forms so 
that their concerns may be forwarded to the appropriate of- 
fices for action. 

The Center also provides a place to meet and share ideas 
with other adult learners. A student organization called OWLS 
(Older Wiser Learners) is coordinated through the Center 
Additional information is available by calling (61 5) 898-5989. 

Alumni Association 

The MTSU National Alumni Association encourages interac- 
tion between Middle Tennessee State University and the ex- 
tended University family of alumni, students, parents, and 
friends through a variety of activities and programs. Through 
the promotion and development of geographical alumni chap- 
ters and reunion programs, the Alumni Association stimu- 
lates and enhances communication for MTSU. Events and 
activities in conjunction with University athletic and fine arts 
programs, especially at Homecoming, are held to offer con- 
tinuing support and interaction. Establishing and promoting 
scholarships is an on-going endeavor of the Alumni Associa- 
tion as well as the maintenance of the alumni information 
database and development of periodic alumni directories. 
The Alumni Relations Office is located in the Alumni Center, 
one of the four original buildings on campus. 

Athletics 

The Middle Tennessee State University athletics program 
strives for excellence in the development of its student-ath- 
letes and the quality of its several sports teams. The program 
supports the academic, athletic, and social education of its 
student-athletes by encouraging them to develop the values 
of respect for themselves and others and to take pride in 
achievement and making positive contributions to the com- 
munities in which they live. 

MTSU is committed to quality athletics programs that bring 
the campus community together and promote a sense of pride 
and tradition in academic and athletic excellence. The ath- 
letics program also brings the university regional and national 



recognition and provides a link between the university, its 
alumni, and the community at large. It helps to gain alumni 
and public support for all aspects of the university. The ath- 
letics program provides quality faculty and leadership to cam- 
pus programs. It gives students, faculty, and alumni opportu- 
nities for innovative public service activities, such as the "Read- 
ing Raider" program of recent years which has worked with 
area elementary schools to promote reading skills among their 
students. It uses athletic, financial, and physical resources to 
maintain and develop athletic programs to accomplish the 
mission of the University. 

The University is a member of the Ohio Valley Conference 
and National Collegiate Athletic Association, competing in. 
NCAA Division I in all sports except football which moved to 
l-A in 1 999 and will be an independent team. All other sports 
teams will continue to compete within the OVC. MTSU is 
represented annually in athletics by baseball, basketball, cross 
country, football, golf, tennis, indoor track, and outdoor track 
for men and by basketball, cross-country, soccer, Softball, ten- 
nis, indoor track, outdoor track, and volleyball for women. 

Both full-time and part-time students are admitted to all home 
football, basketball, volleyball, and baseball games by pre- 
senting their valid ID cards at the gate. Athletic events in other 
sports require no admission and are open to the public and 
campus community. The ticket office is located in Murphy 
Center on the track level. Additional ticket information can 
be obtained by phoning 1-888-MTSU-YES. 

MTSU's Title IX coordinator is Forrestine Williams, 220 Cope 
Administration Building, (615) 898-2185. 

Cafeterias 

Four University locations offer wholesome food for students 
at reasonable rates: the Grill in Keathley University Center; 
McCallie Dining Hall in Corlew; James Union Building Caf- 
eteria; and CyberCafe in Woodmore. They are operated for 
the benefit and convenience of the students, faculty and their 
guests, and other guests on the campus who may be attend- 
ing conferences or other official functions. Several different 
meal plans are available for those who are interested. 

Center for Historic Preservation 

One of two Centers of Excellence at MTSU, the Center for 
Historic Preservation was established in 1 984. It is a research 
and public service institute committed to the identification, 
conservation, protection, and enhancement of the historic 
environment. Through its varied projects, programs, and ac- 
tivities, the Center responds directly to the needs and con- 
cerns of communities and organizations working to include 
heritage in their future economic development strategies. 
Providing leadership and assistance on a local, state, regional, 
and national basis, the Center's work falls within six initia- 
tives. 



10 Academic and student Services 



Town and country preservation recognizes the unique heri- 
tage, resources, and problems of rural areas and small towns. 
National Register nominations for individual buildings and 
historic districts are an ongoing priority of this initiative. The 
Tennessee Century Farm program is a documentary and edu- 
cational project for farms that have been in the same family 
for at least 100 years. The African-American Rural Church 
Project, also a continuing project, documents the state's his- 
toric black churches, often identifying schools and cemeter- 
ies as well. 

Heritage education addresses the use of local historic re- 
sources as teaching tools in the K-1 2 grades. The Center co- 
operates with the MTSU College of Education and local 
schools to develop and test new teaching materials and pro- 
vide teacher-training worbhops. The Center also works closely 
with community heritage organizations to guide and assist 
them in preservation and education projects. The Heritage 
Education Network is a national website for teachers. 

Heritage tourism is specifically directed at research and meth- 
ods for communities to use to attract and increase visitation 
to local cultural and historic sites while protecting and inter- 
preting these significant resources. The Center's current 
projects include the development of a national heritage area 
on the Civil War and comprehensive technical assistance to 
Murfreesboro/Rutherford County as a gateway to the area. 

Building technology and architectural conservation involves 
research methodology and technology for dating, analyzing, 
and applying restoration techniques. The Center offers assis- 
tance with paint and wallpaper analysis and strurtural inves- 
tigation and recommendations. The Center is the lead agency 
in a national project on curatorial standards for architectural 
fragment collections. 

Information resources management includes the Center's 
computer resources, such as autocad drawings, access to pres- 
ervation databases, desktop publishing, and other necessary 
support programs for the development and completion of 
projects in each of the Center's initiatives. 

Museum and historic sites offers assistance to heritage mu- 
seums in basic planning, adaptive restoration of historic build- 
ings for museum use, collections management, and exhibit 
development. The Center focuses on addressing the needs 
and problems of small museums. 

Graduate-level staff teach two to three historic preservation 
courses each year for the Department of History and direct 
selected theses. The Center also funds a limited number of 
graduate research assistantships each year. Graduate and un- 
dergraduate students work at the Center to assist staff on a 
variety of applied research and public service projects, gain- 
ing valuable interdisciplinary experience to supplement their 
in-class training. The Center's technical library and facilities 
are visited by and serve students, interested individuals, and 
preservation professionals. 

One recent project. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History 
and Culture, is a partnership between the Center, the Ten- 
nessee Historical Society, and the Tennessee General Assem- 
bly, to produce a modern, comprehensive reference book on 
history and culture. The book was released in 1998. 



Center for Popular Music 

One of two Centers of Excellence at MTSU, the Center for 
Popular Music is an interdisciplinary research center devoted 
to promoting scholarship in and disseminating information 
on American popular music. The Center recognizes popular 
music as a unique form of human expression that is shaped 
by a variety of socio-cultural, artistic, commercial, and tech- 
nological factors and as one which has always occupied a 
significant place in American cultural history. In support of its 
aims, the Center maintains an extensive archive and spon- 
sors various research projects, publications, and public pro- 
grams. 

The Center's research collection is broadly representative of 
the diversity of American vernacular music, while being par- 
ticularly strong in its holdings of music of the southeast. Rock 
and roll (and its roots) and the many forms of vernacular reli- ■ 
gious music are major focuses of the collection. Holdings en- f 
compass a variety of media, including sheet music, sound 
recordings, audio and video tapes, boob, serials, photographs, 
posters, manuscripts, clippings, and microforms. 

The Center is engaged in an extensive program of activities, 
including sponsoring lectures, conferences, and symposia; 
producing concerts of historical popular music and produc- 
ing extensively-annotated sound recordings. 

The Center's resources support undergraduate, graduate, and 
faculty research in a variety of disciplines and departments. 
Noteworthy among these are the Recording Industry Depart- 
ment, the Music Industry concentration in the Music Depart- 
ment, the Public History program in the History Department, 
and the interdisciplinary Southern Studies and African-Ameri- 
can Studies minors. The Center's resources also serve the 
music industry, scholars from other institutions in North 
America and Europe, trade and university presses, and the 
broadcast media. 

Day Care Laboratory 

The MTSU Day Care Laboratory provides a safe, healthy, and 
stimulating environment where children ages three to five 
can stay on a half-time basis (either Monday Wednesday 
Friday or Tuesday Thursday) while their parents are at school. 
The maximum capacity is 24 children per day with the fol- 
lowing enrollment priorities: 

1 . children of students who need part-time care (first priority in Fall 
and Spring Semesters); 

2. children of students who need full-time time care (first priority in 
the Summer Semester); 

3. children of University employees; 

4. children of community persons. 

Disabled Student Services 

Disabled Student Services is the coordinating body which 
distributes information concerning services available to stu- 
dents with disabilities. The office acts as an advocate for dis- 
abled students at the University, surveying the needs of these 
students and developing programs to meet those needs. In- 
formation and assistance can be obtained by calling (615) 
898-2783 (TDD 61 5-898-2836) or visiting the office located 



Academic and Student Services 1 1 



in Keathley University Center 120. In addition, information 
may be obtained by visiting the University's website. 

MTSU's ADA/504 coordinator is Docia Rudley, 116 Cope 
Administration Building, (615) 898-2025. 

Endowed Chairs 

Several academic programs are enriched through the estab- 
lishment of Chairs dedicated to the support of a particular 
discipline. The chairholders may be full-time faculty mem- 
bers or may be individuals from the appropriate business or 
professional field who are on campus for special seminars or 
lecture series. 

Two Chairs, funded by gifts to the University Foundation, are 
administered through the Economics and Finance Depart- 
ment, of which the chairholders are members. More infor- 
mation is available through that department. The Chairs are 

Martin Chair of Insurance 

Weatherford Chair of Finance 

MTSU houses nine Chairs of Excellence, established with a 
combination of private. University, and State funds. They are 
The Jennings Jones Chair in Free Enterprise 

College of Business 
The Jennings Jones Chair in Urban and Regional 
Planning 

College of Business 
The John Seigenthaler Chair in First Amendment 
Studies 

College of Mass Communication 
The Dr. Carl Adams Chair in HealthCare Services 

Several departments 
The National HealthCare Chair in Nursing 

School of Nursing 
The Robert E. and Georgianna West Russell Chair in 
Manufacturing Excellence 

Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 

Department 
The Katherine Davis Murfree Chair in Dyslexic 
Studies 

Several departments 
John C. Miller Chair in Equine Reproductive 
Physiology 

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience 
Mary E. Miller Chair in Equine Health 

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience 

Albert Gore Research Center 

The Albert Gore Research Center, a manuscripts repository, 
collects and makes available for research materials that docu- 
ment the history of Middle Tennessee State University, its 
students, its faculty, its alumni, and the region that it serves. 
Although it is visited by scholars from across the United States 
and from abroad, the primary missions of the Center are 1) 
to give MTSU students hands-on experience with materials 
that document their heritage and 2) to provide the many con- 
stituents of MTSU with materials to facilitate development of 
appropriate public policy. The Center is named in honor of 



the late Albert Gore, Sr. (B.S., MTSU '32) former U.S. con- 
gressman and senator, whose papers were the first of many 
congressional and private collections accessioned. 

Housing and Residential Life 

Housing facilities on campus include 24 residence halls and 
apartment complexes housing 3,800 single students and fami- 
lies. Information may be obtained from Housing and Resi- 
dential Life, Keathley University Center 300. 

Information Technology 

The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides support 
for students, faculty, and staff to effectively use computer and 
telecommunications technology. Any MTSU student, faculty, 
or staff member may have an account on the central server 
for accessing on-campus resources as well as state, regional, 
national, and international networks including Internet. To 
set up a new account, come by the OIT office in the base- 
ment of Cope Administration Building or use the online ac- 
count creation option, MAKEID. With MAKEID, users telnet 
to MTSU from a computer on-campus or off-campus to cre- 
ate a new account. Instructions are available on the OIT web 
page. OIT assigns the username and password, and the ac- 
count is usually ready to use within three hours. OIT assists 
the instructional effort in many ways including providing train- 
ing on the Internet for students, faculty, and staff and assis- 
ting faculty with development of technology-based instruc- 
tional tools. The MTSU ID card system is administered by 
OIT. All MTSU students, faculty, and staff carry an MTSU ID 
card for access to campus services and privileges. Adminis- 
trative functions such as web and telephone registration and 
student information systems are also supported through OIT. 

The Instructional Technology Support Center 

The Instructional Technology Support Center (ITSC), located 
in the McWherter Learning Resources Center, provides fa- 
cilities, training, and support for the use of instructional tech- 
nology by MTSU faculty, MTSU students, and K-1 2 teachers. 
The ITSC consists of several related units and facilities, in- 
cluding AudioMsual Services, Instructional Media Resources, 
two computer labs, faculty and graduate student multimedia 
development centers, a teleconferencing classroom, and a 
multimedia classroom. 

AudioA'isual Services consists of two sub-units. Equipment 
Services and Television Services. Equipment Services main- 
tains an inventory of audio-visual equipment for faculty check- 
out, repairs campus audiovisual equipment, provides dub- 
bing services, records off-air programming for classroom use, 
and supports satellite downlinking. Television Services offers 
professional video production services for MTSU faculty and 
administrators, including studio production, remote produc- 
tion, and post production. 

Instructional Media Resources (IMR) manages a large col- 
lection of videotapes, audio tapes, slides, filmstrips, computer 
software, CD-ROMs, and laserdiscs available for faculty use 
in classrooms and for on-site use by students. Instructional 



1 2 Academic and Student Services 



Media Resources also has typewriters and both Macintosh 
and Pentium computers available for walk-in use by faculty 
and students. Faculty can reserve IMR materials and place 
their own multimedia resources on reserve in Instructional 
Media Resources for on-site use by their students. 

Two Pentium computer labs are available in the ITSC for use 
by faculty and students. Computers in both labs have access 
to the campus network. A description of the hardware and 
software in the computer labs and a monthly listing of open 
hours are posted on the ITSC web page (http://www.mtsu.edu/ 
—itsc). 

Faculty and graduate students can create multimedia lectures 
or presentations at four multimedia development stations in 
the ITSC. Faculty may reserve the ITSC teleconferencing class- 
room (LRC 101T; seating 30) or the multimedia auditorium 
(LRC 221; seating 399) for occasional use by their classes. 
Both rooms contain a computer, computer projection capa- 
bility, access to the campus network, satellite downlink capa- 
bility, and a full complement of audio-visual equipment. 

Keathley University Center — 
James Union Building 

The Keathley University Center and James Union Building 
are service-oriented buildings for the use of the campus com- 
munity. Services and facilities include 

• a modern, self-service bookstore; 

• a complete service post office with individual mailboxes 
available; 

• recreational facilities such as billiards, ping-pong, cards, 
chess, checkers, and electronic games; 

• a mini-market with a variety of snacks; 

• meeting rooms, ballroom, and auditorium for clubs, orga- 
nizations, and campus-sponsored programs; 

• diversified programs which include movies, musical groups, 
speakers, dances, and cultural events all planned and pre- 
sented by student committees; and 

• food services including the Keathley University Center Grill 
and James Union Building banquet and luncheon services. 

McWherter Learning Resources Center 

The McWherter Learning Resources Center provides the op- 
portunity for a different approach to learning. Completed in 
1975, this unique 65,000 square-foot facility received na- 
tional recognition for the award-winning design and is con- 
sidered a model by other institutions throughout the region. 
The McWherter Learning Resources Center is the primary 
facility for teacher education programs and provides instruc- 
tional technology support to faculty and programs at MTSU 
as well as area school districts. 

In addition to the Instruaional Technology Support Center, 
the support areas of Photographic Services and Publications 
and Graphics have the dual responsibility of producing ma- 
terials for classroom use and for serving the entire University 
community's photography and publication needs. Also 
housed in the facility are the WMOT-FM Radio Station and 
the Gore Research Center. 



Murphy Center 

Charles M. Murphy Center is a multi-purpose building for 
instrurtion, recreation, athletics, and convocations. This ver- 
satile structure provides facilities that enhance the total health, 
physical education, recreation, and safety programs as well 
as house some of the outstanding athletic and entertainment 
events in Tennessee. The complex includes the Monte Hale 
Basketball Arena, two auxiliary gymnasiums, four handball 
courts, classrooms, two dance studios, an indoor track, in- 
door tennis courts, men's and women's dressing rooms, and 
weight training equipment. The ticket office is also located in 
Murphy Center (track level). 

Placement and Student Employment Center 

The University provides a year-round centralized placement 
service for its students and alumni through the Placement 
and Student Employment Center located in Keathley Univer- 
sity Center 328. The program is designed to assist prospec- 
tive graduates and alumni in securing career positions. Each 
year employers from business, industry, government, and 
education conduct on-campus interviews with students in 
the Placement Center. Other placement services include the 
development of reference files for credentials, career job list- 
ings, part-time and summer employment opportunities, and 
the career library. 

Students seeking part-time jobs in the community may apply 
through the Student Employment Center. Referrals to pro- 
spective employers will be made by the Center. 

Recreation Center 

The Campus Recreation Office, located in the Recreation 
Center, administers a comprehensive recreation program for 
MTSU students. Opportunities include participation in team 
or club sports, outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, aquatic pro- 
grams, and leisure clinics. A wide variety of outdoor and other 
recreation equipment is available for checkout by students. 

The Recreation Center, which opened in Fall 1995, provides 
students with a state-of-the-art facility. The Center includes 
six basketball/volleyball courts, six racquetball courts, an in- 
door track, an aerobics room, an 8,000-square-foot free 
weights area, cardiovascular machines, an indoor swimming 
pool, locker rooms, an indoor gym for soccer and roller 
hockey a rock climbing wall, an outdoor pool, a child care 
area, an outdoor ropes course, and a sun deck with four sand 
volleyball courts adjacent. The Center is open seven days a 
week during the fall and spring semesters and the summer 
term. The Recreation Center closes during fall break. Thanks- 
giving holidays, Christmas holidays, and spring break. The 
schedule may be adjusted during other University holidays 
and for certain special University events. More information 
on programs or the Center may be obtained by contaaing the 
Campus Recreation Office (898-2104). 



I 



student Access to Educational Records 

This policy may be found on page 36 of this catalog. 

University Library 

The University Library provides access to information from 
its own collections and from resources around the world. The 
library supports student research needs from a central facility 
containing print volumes, microform materials, and computer 
databases. 

In addition to over 600,000 printed volumes of books, ref- 
erence sources, and government documents, the Library con- 
tains another 400,000 volumes of periodicals, newspapers, 
and research titles in microtext formats. The Library receives 
over 3,500 subscriptions to periodicals and also serves as a 
partial depository for United States government publications. 
In addition to the online system, there are other computerized 
information databases available to users. 

A new central library of 250,000 square feet was opened in 
January 1999 in which collections of materials and services 
needed by students are provided. These meet their needs for 
course assignments, assigned reading, term papers, projects, 
and student research. In addition to these, recreational read- 
ing materials and other information are available to meet the 
information needs of students. The new facility provides vari- 
ous kinds of seating for 2,500 users as well as 350 computers 
for accessing both local and international information re- 
sources. Special features of the newlibrary include an Adap- 
tive Technologies Center to meet needs of disabled students, 
43 small group study rooms, and 143 graduate research car- 
rels. 

Students are encouraged to ask librarians about the kinds of 
materials that are available in the Library and about the meth- 
ods that can be used to retrieve information. Librarians are 
available at the main floor Reference/Information Desk. Stu- 
dents are requested to become familiar with the library poli- 



Academic and Student Services 13 



ciesaswell as the various printed research guides which con- 
tain further information about Library collections and services. 
A student ID card is required to check out library materials. 
More information is available on the library's web page on 
the Internet. 

Women's Center 

The June Anderson Women's Center OAWC) has been serv- 
ing women at MTSU since 1 977. Support groups, workshops, 
and programs for women are offered during the academic 
year. A free legal clinic is open the last Thursday of each 
month. The office, located on the main floor of the James 
Union Building, provides a safe space for women to meet 
together or use the JAWC library. A resource and referral file 
includes information on financial aid for women, housing, 
and community legal, health, and mental health services. 

The annual Women's Leadership Conference for college and 
university women students is coordinated through the JAWC 
and the Women's Studies Program each spring. Students are 
welcome to attend and to volunteer for this and other 
Women's Center activities. 

During Spring Semester, the Women's Center, working 
collaboratively with the National Women's History Month 
Committee, sponsors events, programs, and films which bring 
together the campus and community in a celebration of 
women's contributions to culture and society. 

A full-time professional counselor is available at the Women's 
Center for crisis intervention and personal counseling for stu- 
dents dealing with women-identified issues and concerns. 
Confidentiality is assured. Support groups on body image and 
surviving sexual assault are regularly offered. The counselor 
may be contacted at (615) 898-5725. 

Additional information about the Women's Center's activi- 
ties or services is available by calling (61 5) 898-21 93 or via 
the Internet. 




14 



International Programs and Services 



International Programs and Services Office 
Cope Administration Building 202 

The International Programs and Services Office (IPSO) 
serves as the admissions office for international students. 
International students include all non-U.S. citizen ap- 
plicants (visa holders and permanent residents). All in- 
quiries and correspondence should be addressed to this 
office. Application packets, including forms and require- 
ment instructions, can be obtained by telephoning or 
writing IPSO or via http://www.mtsu.edu/~ipso. Uni- 
versity catalogs cannot be mailed overseas. Applicants 
abroad can apply for the Fall and Spring semesters only. 
Applicants who are already in the U.S. and in F1 or Jl 
status may apply for Summer. 

The University provides immigration advisement 
through the International Programs and Services Office. 
IPSO is responsible for issuing 1-20 and lAP-66 forms 
and evaluating college credits obtained from foreign 
universities. IPSO serves as a liaison between faculty 
members, administrators, and international students. 
The office caters to a variety of international student needs 
including housing, academic matters, community affairs, 
and programming. 

Residency 

IPSO determines residency for international students includ- 
ing permanent residents. All students who are non-U.S. citi- 
zens at the time of admission will be considered out-of-state 
for tuition purposes until they apply for and receive in-state 
status. Permanent residents and others who believe they meet 
the in-state criteria may obtain an application and submit it 
to the IPSO office. The completed form and supporting docu- 
mentation should be submitted one month prior to the term. 
Failure to file may result in payment of out-of-state tuition. 
Students will be informed of the residency decision by mail. 

immigration 

it is the student's responsibility to see that he/she is in legal 
immigration status. All immigration documents should be kept 
in a safe place. According to U.S. Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service (INS) regulations, F1 and Jl students must be 
enrolled fulltime (minimum 9 hours) during Fall and Spring 
semesters. Summer enrollment is optional. Also, INS requires 
that F1 and Jl applicants meet all admission requirements 
prior to enrollment. No conditional admission is possible. 



Proof of English Proficiency 

An international student must submit a successful Test of En- 
glish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score or University of 



Michigan English Language Institute (UMELI) test given by 
the International English Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, 
before he/she can register at MTSU. Applicants who cannot 
obtain locally a TOEFL Bulletin of Information for Candidates 
should write for it well in advance to 

Test of English as a Foreign Language 

RO. Box 899 

Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08540 
For information on UMELI testing, contact 

International English Institute 

1226 16th Avenue, South 

Nashville, TN 37212 

(615) 327-1715 or 327-1716 

Deadlines for Completed* Files: 

Fall Semester: July 31 of same year; Spring Semester: No- 
vember 30 of previous year; Summer Semester: April 1 5 of 
same year. (Applies to students already in the United States.) 

*NOTE: A completed file contains ALL acceptable materials required 
for admission. 



Application to MTSU: 

International students include visa holders and permanent 
resident applicants. 

1 . Complete graduate application for admission. 

2. Submit $30.00 non-refundable application fee (money order or 
check with routing numbers). 

3. Submit evidence of freedom from tuberculosis. 

4. Submit evidence of two rubeola vaccinations. 

5. Submit a financial statement or front and back copy of perma- 
nent resident card, whichever is applicable. 

6. Submit official TOEFL (computer-based minimum score 1 73, pa- 
per-based minimum score 525) or UMELI (minimum score 85); 
CRE or CMAT scores as required. (We do not accept any other 
than ETS official test scores for the TOEFL.) 

7. Submit completed insurance form for F1 and Jl applicants. 

8. Submit a front and back copy of 1 -94, if applicable. 

9. Submit a front and back copy of 1 -20 or IAP-66, if applicable. 

10. Student must have official transcripts sent from all institution(s) 
directly to IPSO. If transcripts are written in a foreign language, an 
official translation in English and an official non-translated tran- 
script must both be sent. A syllabus of each class may be required 
in order to receive course substitution credit. 

NOTE: Sending all documents except transcript(s) and test scores in 
one envelope will expedite processing of the application. If the student 
does not have a Social Security number, the office will assign a student 
ID number for record-keeping purposes only. The Social Security num- 
ber or student ID number should be on all correspondence sent to the 
office. All materials received become the property of MTSU and cannot 
be returned to the student or forwarded to a third party. 

All F1 and Jl students must attend orientation before they 
can register for classes. Additional information about the ser- 
vices of IPSO may be found at the website or in the under- 
graduate catalog. 



f 

Continuing Studies and Public Service 



15 



Rosemary Owens, Dean 

Cope Administration Building 113 

The purpose of the Division of Continuing Studies and 
Public Service at Middle Tennessee State University is 
to extend services of the University to adults, individu- 
als, and groups beyond the resident students on cam- 
pus. The division is divided into two main areas — credit 
and non-credit. The credit area coordinates distance 
learning, off-campus courses, summer school, and 
evening classes. The non-credit area caters to profes- 
sionals interested in updating skills, groups or organiza- 
tions desiring some type of educational experience, or 
persons needing any of the non-credit services outlined 
below. More information on either of these areas can 
be obtained by contacting the Division of Continuing 
Studies and Public Service, (615) 898-2462. 

Credit Areas 

Distance Learning Courses 

Distance learning courses, coordinated through the Division 
of Continuing Studies and Public Service, include courses via 
video conferencing, telecourses, correspondence courses, and 
online courses. 

• Video Conferencing Courses - Video conferencing courses send 
the instructor's "live" lectures at MTSU to students at the remote 
sites. Sites include Spring Hill, Motlow State Community College, 
and Columbia State Community College. The video conferencing 
classrooms are equipped with TV monitors and push-to-talk mi- 
crophones so that the students and instructors can interact. The 
instructor will visit the remote sites during the semester assuring 
that each student will have an opportunity to meet him/her in per- 
son. The instructor is also available during office hours at MTSU by 
phone, e-mail, or in person. 

• Telecourses - Telecourses are delivered primarily over cable televi- 
sion. Students are required to attend an orientation and two ex- 
aminations on campus. Instead of attending lectures on campus, 
telecourse students watch approximately one hour of programs each 
week. The telecourses are available on several local channels and 
in the McWherter Learning Resources Center. Telecourse tapes may 
also be rented. In addition, students read their texts and study guides 
and submit assignments as scheduled. Teachers are available at set 
times for consultation. More information may be obtained by call- 
ing (615) 898-5374 or visiting the telecourse homepage at 
www.mtsu.edu/~tlcourse. 

• Correspondence Courses - Correspondence courses involve indi- 
vidual, independent instruction of a student by an instructor on a 
one-to-one basis. Typically, this entails home study as well as the 
exchange of materials and evaluations through the mail. Interac- 
tion and feedback between correspondence course faculty and stu- 
dents takes the form of written assignments, testing, evaluations, 
guidance, and assistance via such media as telephone, FAX, e-mail, 
and other electronic technologies. More information may be ob- 
tained via e-mail at corres@mtsu.edu. 

• Online Courses - Online courses are accessed over the Internet 
through e-mail, newsgroups, distribution lists, and the World Wide 
Web. Only students with strong experience on the Internet should 
register for an online course. Students are required to have access 



to a computer and the Internet. Students must attend at least one 
proctored examination and must complete assignments. A photo 
ID must be presented at all exams. All other assignments and quiz- 
zes will be available through the Internet. More information may 
be obtained by visiting www.mtsu.edu/~netcours. 

More information can be obtained by calling (61 5) 898-561 1 . 

The current schedule book carries course offerings. 

Evening School 

The Division of Continuing Studies and Public Service serves 
students attending MTSU at night by assisting with registra- 
tion, accepting payment of fees/fines for the Business Office, 
providing catalogs and schedule books, making IDs and issu- 
ing parking permits, as well as offering other services to the 
student outside regular daytime business hours. More infor- 
mation is available by contacting the Evening School Office, 
(615)898-5611. 

Off-campus Program 

Credit courses are regularly scheduled at several off-campus 
locations in middle Tennessee, including Smyrna, Spring Hill, 
Motlow State Community College, and Columbia State Com- 
munity College. Efforts are made to service any special re- 
quests for off-campus credit courses by business and indus- 
try, school systems, and agencies. 

Summer School 

The Division of Continuing Studies and Public Service directs 
the summer school, which includes a substantial number of 
credit courses. Course offerings are available in the current 
summer schedule book. 




16 Continuing Studies and Public Service 




Non-credit Area 

Courses, Seminars, and Conferences 

The non-credit area assists groups and individuals in the plan- 
ning, advertising, coordinating, and delivery of courses, semi- 
nars, and conferences. Various non-credit courses are offered 
each semester as well as upon demand. They are intended 
to serve business, industry, government, education, profes- 
sional organizations, and civic and service groups. A current 
course catalog is available by calling (61 5) 898-2462. 

Computer and career programs are offered on campus for 
individuals trying to upgrade skills to advance themselves in 
the workplace or for personal development. Career consult- 
ing is available on a one-to-one basis using career software. 
Computer courses provide hands-on learning using current 
software packages as well as courses relating to the Internet 
and PC maintenance. 

Professional development certification programs, seminars, 
workshops, and short courses that focus on timely and lead- 
ing-edge topics are presented on and off campus. Current 
client groups include human resource managers, municipal 
clerks, engineers, lawyers, accountants, cosmetologists, emer- 
gency medical technicians, government officers, and payroll 
administrators. 

Children, teens, adults, and senior adults can choose from 
courses ranging from leisure and recreation programs to per- 
sonal enrichment. Children and teens selections include sum- 
mer day camps, art and drama programs, and gymnastics. 



Adults can pick from exam prep courses, foreign languages, 
recreation activities, and English as a Second Language. 
Elderhostel and other programs are offered for senior adults. 

Continuing Education units (CEUs) are awarded to persons 
successfully completing most of the special interest activities. 
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools defines a 
CEU as "ten contact hours of participation in an organized 
continuing education experience under responsible sponsor- 
ship, capable direction, and qualified instruction." The CEU 
provides a standard unit of nationally recognized measure- 
ment whereby business, industry, and professions may grant 
appropriate recognition to persons for completion of con- 
tinuing education programs. A permanent record of all CEUs 
earned is maintained by the University. A transcript may be 
obtained by sending a written request to the Division of Con- 
tinuing Studies and Public Service. 

Training and Professional Development Center 

The Training and Professional Development Center (TPDQ 
offers various human resource services for business, industry, 
and government, including customized on-site training, needs 
assessments, and specialized workforce analysis. Current pro- 
grams include team building, customer service, leadership, 
supervision, and written and interpersonal communication. 

Inquiries should be directed to the director of the Training 
and Professional Development Center, phone (615) 898- 
2407. 



College of 

Graduate Studies 



I he Graduate School was established in 1951 in recogni- 
tion of the importance graduate instruction had attained at 
Middle Tennessee State University. As graduate education con- 
tinued to grow and develop at the university, the Graduate 
School was renamed the College of Graduate Studies in 1 991 
to signify the academic status of the College. All graduate de- 
grees at the University are awarded by the College of Gradu- 
ate Studies, under the auspices of the dean of the College of 
Graduate Studies. 

The mission of the College of Graduate Studies is to provide 
academic, financial, and other support services for graduate 
students, while upholding academic standards. The College 
certifies that every candidate for conferral of a graduate de- 
gree has fulfilled all academic requirements. The College con- 
tributes assistance to help ensure that each graduate program 
provides the optimal educational experiences for its graduate 
students. This support includes the distribution of graduate 
assistant funds and the provision of graduate fellowships. The 
College also serves as the central collegiate component for 
uniting the entire graduate academic community at MTSU. 
The College, in consultation with the faculty, establishes poli- 
cies and procedures to promote excellence in graduate 
education. These include processes to ensure judicious and 
selective graduate student admission decisions; rigorous 
adherence to the academic standards expected of gradu- 
ate students; monitoring for excellence in graduate pro- 
gram curricula via the graduate program review pro- 
cess; and selectivity in making graduate faculty appoint- 
ments. This latter graduate faculty standard enhances 
the opportunities for graduate students to receive op- ?< ; 
timal intellectual challenges and quality research f f 
mentoring during the course of their graduate expe- | | 
riences at MTSU. The importance of scholarly 1^" I 
research in graduate education is exemplified by 
the fact that the College of Graduate Studies, 
in consultation with the Faculty Research 
Committee, selects recipients for faculty 
research grants. 



O 



./ 



18 



Graduate Student Bill of Rights 
and Responsibilities 



The Graduate Council and the College of Graduate Studies 
have approved in principle the document Craduate Student 
Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. 

Rights 

1 . Graduate students have a right to be respected as indi- 
viduals of merit and as junior colleagues of faculty. The 
student's vulnerability must not be exploited in any v^/ay 
by faculty, administration, or staff. (Reference: Faculty 
Handbook, Ethics Guidelines, Section IV, I.B., I.C.2, page 
2) 

2. Graduate students have a right to an accurate and timely 
description of the availability and the likelihood of finan- 
cial and resource support within their program and within 
the University and will be given an equal opportunity to 
compete for support for which they are eligible. 

a. Prospective and currently enrolled graduate students 
should be provided a thorough description of the 
requirements and qualifications necessary for hold- 
ing teaching assistantships, graduate assistantships, 
and receiving financial support from the University. 

b. Prospective and currently enrolled graduate students 
should be provided a thorough description of the 
requirements and qualifications for all academic and 
financial awards in their program and in the Gradu- 
ate Catalog. They are to be assured that competi- 
tion for any and all academic awards will be avail- 
able to eligible graduate students and that evalua- 
tion for such awards will be fair and objective. They 
also should be informed of the procedures for evalu- 
ating applicants. 

3. Graduate students have a right to be informed of spe- 
cific requirements for achieving an advanced degree. Each 
department should communicate clearly these require- 
ments to its students, and it should notify current en- 
rolled students in writingof any changes. Prospective and 
currently enrolled graduate students have a right to know 
of the "normal time to complete a degree" within a spe- 
cific graduate program. 

4. Graduate students have a right to a non-biased evalua- 
tion of their progress toward achieving an advanced de- 
gree (Constitution of the Student Government Associa- 
tion, Art II Sec 3). The criteria should be clearly under- 
stood by the graduate advisor and student. 

5. If a graduate student requests an explanation, reasons 
for unsatisfactory performance on qualifying or compre- 
hensive examinations should be given in writing. 

6. Graduate students have a right to substantive feedback 
and regular guidance concerning their academic perfor- 
mance. 

a. Graduate students and their thesis/dissertation di- 
rector should arrive at and maintain a mutually agree- 
able schedule of evaluative/supervisory conferences. 



b. Graduate students must be notified in writing of 
unsatisfactory performance before any attempt be- 
gins to dismiss them from a graduate program. Only 
the dean of the College of Graduate Studies can dis- 
miss a student from a graduate program for academic 
reasons and normally only upon the recommen- 
dation of the program. Graduate students have the 
right to appeal for cause any decision affecting their 
academic standing as a graduate student. Cause ex- 
cludes grade appeals, which are under the purview 
of the MTSU Grade Appeals Committee. The bur- 
den of responsibility rests with the appellant to pro- 
vide a timely, cogent, and convincing written docu- 
mentation of the facts upon which the appeal is 
based. Further information may be obtained from 
the appeals document from the Graduate Council, 
Section III. 

7. Graduate students have a right to freedom from unlaw- 
ful discrimination in any actions, including those based 
on gender, race, age, sexual orientation, disability, and 
religious or political beliefs. (Constitution of The Student 
Government Association, Art II Sec 1.2.6; MTSU Poli- 
cies and Procedures Manual 111:00:09, IV: 07:06, 
IV:07:16:i). University grievance procedures should be 
available upon request at the Graduate College. Oppor- 
tunities for informal resolution should also be explained 
to the student when appropriate. 

8. Graduate students have a right to reasonable confidenti- 
ality in their communications with professors. (Constitu- 
tion of the Student Government Association, Art II Sec 
4; MTSU Policies and Procedures Manual 11:02:00) 

a. In general, a student's performance or behavior 
should not be discussed by a professor with other 
students. 

b. Discussion among faculty of a student's performance 
should be of a professional nature and should be 
limited to the student's academic performance and 
fitness as a graduate student: the substance of the 
communication should be based on a need to know 
relevant information. 

9. Graduate students have a right to refuse to perform tasks 
if those tasks are not closely related to their academic or 
professional development. 

10. Craduate students have a right to receive fair recogni- 
tion for their efforts and contributions to cooperative re- 
search projects, including co-authorship of publications. 
Efforts and recognition should be determined prior to 
the project whenever possible. 

11. Graduate students should be represented in the deci- 
sion-making process relative to graduate issues in their 
department and program; however, the representation 
is program specific, possibly taking many different forms. 
Graduate students should have the opportunity annually 
to evaluate their professors in writing, without fear of 
retribution. 



19 



1 2. Graduate students have a right to review vitae of faculty 
members within their degree program/departments who 
are qualified/eligible to serve on their graduate commit- 
tee. These vitae should be made available at the time 
the students are accepted into their program to aid them 
in selecting their committee members. 

Responsibilities 

1 . Graduate students have a responsibility to read and be- 
come familiar with the Graduate Catalog, the Graduate 
Student Handbook, and the Student's Rights and Respon- 
sibilities booklet. 

2. Graduate students have a responsibility to complete and 
submit all documents required for admission to the Col- 
lege of Graduate Studies and to their department. 

3. Graduate students have a responsibility to conduct them- 
selves in all academic activities in a manner befitting the 
professorate. Graduate students' behavior should be a 
credit to themselves, the degree program/department, 
and the University. (Student Rights and Responsibilities 
booklet) 

4. Graduate students have a responsibility to devote ap- 
propriate time and energy toward achieving the advanced 
degree within a reasonable time fame as specified by 
their graduate program. 

5. Graduate students have a responsibility to uphold ethi- 
cal norms and honesty in research methodology and 
scholarship. (Student's Rights and Responsibilities book- 
let; MTSU Policies and Procedures Manual 1:01:24; "A 
Statement of Graduate Students' Research Rights and 
Responsibilities at MTSU's College of Business") 

6. Graduate students have a responsibility to communicate 
regularly with faculty members and advisors, especially 
in matters related to research and progress within the 
graduate program. 

7. Graduate students are encouraged to participate in the 
campus community to the extent that they are able and 
to enrich the campus in whatever ways possible, includ- 
ing contributing to: 

a. the academic development and the social environ- 
ment of the department in which they are pursuing 
the advanced degree and 

b. decision making relative to graduate student issues 
in the department, student government, and university. 



Graduate Minors 



Minors are offered in 
Accounting 
Aerospace 
Agriculture 
Art 

Biology 

Business Education 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice Administration 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Earth Science/Geology 
Economics 
Education 
English 

Foreign Languages 
Geography 
Gerontology 
Health 
History 

Human Sciences 
Industrial Studies 
Information Systems 
Library Service 
Mass Communication 
Mathematics 
Music 

Physical Education 
Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Reading 
Recreation 
Safety 
Sociology 
Special Education 
Speech and Theater 
Vocational-Technical Education 

There are three patterns of minors from which a candidate 
must choose: 

1 . a single minor consisting of at least 1 2 semester hours; 
1 2 undergraduate hours in an area are prerequisite to a 
single minor in that area at the master's level; 

2. a minor consisting of a minimum of 6 semester hours in 
each of two subjects; 

3. the distributive minor consisting of a minimum of 12 se- 
mester hours in at least three subjects. 

The candidate is expected to complete the total program in 
the major, minor, and/or cognate fields. A cognate is defined 
as 6 semester hours. 



20 



Graduate Program Information 



Degree 
Major Offered 


Concentration 


Required 
Letters of 
Reference 


Required 
Test* 


College of Graduate Studies, (615) 898-2840 
Non-Degree Seeking None 


Accounting Department, (615) 898-2964, p. 46 

Accounting/Information Systems M.S. 


Accounting (as primary field) 




CPA X 200 + CMAT = 950 
UDCPA X 200 + CMAT = 1000 



Aerospace Department, (61 5) 898-2788, p. 48 

Aerospace Education M.Ed. 

Aviation Administration M.S. 

M.S. 



Airport/Airline Management 
Aviation Asset Management 



CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 



Biology Department, (615) 898-2847, p. 53 

Biology 
Biology 


M.S. 
M.S.T 




CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 


BMOM Department, (615) 898-2902, p. 57 

Business Education 


M.B.E. 


3 


CRE or MAT 


College of Business, (615) 898-2964, p. 56 

Business Administration 


M.B.A. 




CPA X 200 + CMAT = 950 
UDCPA X 200 + CMAT = 1000 


Chemistry Department, (615) 898-2956, p. 59 

Chemistry M.S. 
Chemistry D.A. 




CRE 
CRE 


Computer Information Systems Department, 

Accounting/Information Systems 


(615)898-2964, p. 

M.S. 


62 

Information Systems (as primary field) 


CPA X 200 -1- CMAT = 950 ' 
UDCPA X 200 + CMAT = 1000 


Computer Science Department, (615) 898-2397, p. 64 

Computer Science M.S. 




CRE or MAT 


Criminal justice Administration Department, 

Criminal Justice Administration^ 


(615)898-2630, p 

M.C.). 


66 


CRE or MAT 



Economics and Finance Department, (615) 898-2520, p. 68 

Economics M.A. 

Economics D.A. 

Economics M.A. 

Economics M.A. 



Industrial Relations 
Financial Economics 



CRE or MAT 
CRE 

CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 



Educational Leadership Department, (615) 898-2855, p. 73 

Administration and Supervision 
Administration and Supervision 
Administration and Supervision 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Curriculum and Instruction 



M.Ed. 




3 


CRE or MAT 


Ed.S. 




3 


CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 


Supervisor of Materials (K-12)§ 


3 


CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 




3 


CRE or MAT 


Ed.S. 




3 


CRE or MAT 


,(615)898-2680, 


p. 79 






M.Ed. 






CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 


Early Childhood 




CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 


Elementary School Education 




CRE or MAT 


Ed.S. 


Elementary School Education 




CRE 


M.Ed. 


Middle School Education 




CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 


Mildly/Moderately Disabled 




CRE or MAT 


M.Ed. 


Preschool Disabled 




CRE or MAT 



Reading 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Special Education 
Special Education 

§Library endorsement may be added in this concentration. ^Requires completion of Application for Admission to Graduate Fi^ogram in Criminal Justice 



Degree 
Major Offered 


Concentration 


Graduate Program Information 

Required 

Letters of Required 

Reference Test* 


21 


Elementary and Special Education Department cont. 
Special Education M.Ed. 
Special Education M.Ed. 


Severely/Profoundly Disabled 
Vision Disabilities 




CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 




Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies Department, (615) 898-2776, p. 85 

Industrial Studies M.S Ceneral 
Industrial Studies M.S. Industrial Relations 
Industrial Studies M.S. Safety 




CRE 
CRE 
CRE 




English Department, (615) 898-2573, p. 89 

English M.A. 
English D.A. 




3 
3 


CRE*** 
CRE*** 




Foreign Languages and Literatures Department, (615) 898-2981, p. 92 

Foreign Languages M.A.T. French 
Foreign Languages M.A.T. Spanish 
Foreign Languages M.A.T. Cerman 




CRE 
CRE 
CRE 




HPERS Department, (615) 898-2811, p. 97 

Health, Physical Education, Recreation M.S. 
Health, Physical Education, Recreation M.S. 
Health, Physical Education, Recreation M.S. 
Health, Physical Education, Recreation M.S. 
Exercise Science and Health Promotion M.S. 
Physical Education D.A. 


Health 

Physical Education 

Recreation 


3 


CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 




History Department, (615) 898-2536, p. 104 

History M.A. 
History D.A. 
History M.A. 
History D.A. 


Public History 
Historic Preservation 


3 
3 
3 
3 


CRE 
CRE 
CRE 
CRE 




Human Sciences Department, (615) 898-2884, p. 110 

Human Sciences M.S. 


Nutrition and Food Science 




CRE or MAT 





Child Development and Family Studies 3 



CRE or MAT 



College of Mass Communication, (61 5) 898-281 3, p. 1 1 5 

Mass Communication M.S. 



CRE 



Mathematical Sciences Department, (615) 898-2669, p. 117 

Mathematics M.S. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics M.S.T. 

Mathematics 



Ceneral Mathematics 
Industrial Mathematics 
Research Preparation 
Middle Crade Mathematics 
Secondary Mathematics 



CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 
CRE or MAT 



Music Department, (615) 898-2469, p. 121 

Music 



CRE or MAT 



Psychology Department**, (615) 898-2706, p. 127 

Psychology M.A. 

Psychology M.A. 

Psychology M.A. 

Psychology M.A. 

Psychology M.A. 

School Counseling M.Ed. 

Curriculum and Instruction Ed.S. 



Clinical 

Experimental 

Industrial/Organizational 

Pre-Spec. in Ed.: Sch. Psy. 

Quantitative 

School Psychology 



3 CRE and psy subject exam 

3 CRE 

3 CRE quantitative/analytical 

3 CRE 

3 CRE 

3 CRE or MAT 

3 CRE 



iociology and Anthropology Department, (615) 898-2508, p. 137 

.sociology M.A. 



CRE 



t'ocational-Technical Education, (615) 898-2098, p. 142 

Vocational-Technical Education M.V.T.E. 



CRE or MAT 



'See page 24 for Univenity admissions requiKmenis and the section under the relevant program. "See Department of Psychology section regarding grade 
X)int average requirements '"CRE scores = two of the following: verbal, analytical, subject 



22 



Glossary of Terms 



Admission to degree status — Admission to tlie College of 
Graduate Studies as a graduate student for the purpose of 
seeking a graduate degree. This status requires completing a 
graduate admission application; meeting all entrance and test 
requirements; transmittal of relevant official transcripts; ap- 
proval by the graduate program/department; and approval 
by the College of Graduate Studies. 

NOTE: Some graduate programs allow applicants to begin taking classes 
prior to an admission decision, whereas others prohibit such enroll- 
ment. An applicant should seek information from the relevant graduate 
program about its policy. 

Admission to non-degree status — Admission to the College 
of Graduate Studies as a post-baccalaureate student for the 
purpose of officially taking graduate courses. This status re- 
quires completing a graduate admission application; trans- 
mitting relevant official transcripts; and approval by the Col- 
lege of Graduate Studies. Not all graduate courses are open 
to non-degree students; thus the student should consult with 
the departmental graduate advisor(s). 

Advancement to Candidacy — Status of the student who has 
successfully completed a substantial portion of the curricu- 
lum (and relevant examinations) and, in consultation with 
the graduate advisor, has established a curricular plan to be 
followed for the purpose of graduation. An Advancement to 
Candidacy Form must be approved by the pertinent gradu- 
ate program personnel {e.g. major professor, graduate advi- 
sor, etc.), and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies (or 
designee). The form specifies the courses which the student 
is required to take to complete the curricular requirements. 
This form must be filed and approved prior to completion of 
24 credit hours (or earlier if required by the graduate pro- 
gram). 

Cognate — Six semester hours of related course work 

Comprehensive examination — An examination given to 
master's and specialist's students, generally during the last 
semester of course work. The examination may be oral, writ- 
ten, or a combination of both modes. It may be taken no 
more than twice. The purpose of this examination is to assess 
the candidate's knowledge of a broad academic field and to 
evaluate whether the candidate has attained certain standards 
and/or requirements necessary to successfully complete the 
program. If the examinations are written, they are to be kept 
on file in the department. The student has the right of access 
to his or her graded exam for a period of five (5) years. (D.A. 
students, please see qualifying examination.) 

Concentration — A curricular component of a graduate pro- 
gram representing a weli-recognized subset or branch of the 
discipline. A concentration appears on the student's gradu- 
ate transcript. 



Conditional admission — The granting of temporary admis- 
sion into a graduate program with certain stipulations being 
placed upon the student. Continuation in the program as a 
degree-seeking student is contingent upon fulfilling specific 
requirements described in the conditional admission letter. 

Encumbrance — A hold placed on registration (or transcripts). 
For example, a registration encumbrance will be placed on 
all non-admitted degree-seeking applicants having graduate 
status and who reach a maximum of 1 2 credit hours, or ear- 
lier if required by the graduate program. 

Full-time/part-time graduate status — See student load, page 
34. 

Graduate advisor — A faculty member appointed by the de- 
partment and approved by the College of Graduate Studies 
to advise graduate students and provide curricular planning 
counseling. Graduate students should consult with their gradu- 
ate advisors prior to, or immediately upon, being admitted 
to a graduate program. A list of graduate advisors may be 
obtained at the College of Graduate Studies or the relevant 
department. 

Graduate coordinator or graduate director — ^A faculty mem- 
ber appointed to serve as the principal officer of the graduate 
program with respect to curricular and other relevant mat- 
ters. The department chair often, but not always, serves as 
the graduate director. 

Graduate status — Status whereby a post-baccalaureate stu 
dent is declared eligible to enroll in graduate courses at MTSU. 
The granting of graduate status does not necessarily mean 
that one has been admitted to a graduate program. (Also see 
encumbrance and admission.) 

Graduation requirements — Those academic and other re- 
quirements necessary for successful completion in order to 
be eligible for receipt of the degree. In general, the require- 
ments in existence at the time of matriculation are those which 
must be fulfilled. These requirements are listed in the gradu 
ate catalog of that year. Changes in a graduate curriculum 
may occur while a student is enrolled. If so, the student will 
have the option of fulfilling the new requirements or folloW' 
ing the original plan in existence at the time of matriculation. 
This is subject to "stop-out" limitations and course availabil 
ity. (See stop-out.) 

Intent to graduate — Indication that the candidate is plan' 
ning to complete all degree requirements during the current 
term. An Intent to Graduate Form must be filed by the candi 
date during the first week of the semester of planned gradu- 
ation or by the end of the first week of summer Session II (for 
August graduation). This authorizes release of the student's 
file for final evaluation and authorizes information to be col- 
lected for issuance of the diploma. 



Glossary of Terms 23 



Major — A field of study representing a well recognized disci- 
pline in which there is offered a graduate program. A major 
appears on the student's graduate transcript. 

Major professor — The faculty member providing the primary 
scholarly research mentorship to the graduate student. The 
major professor serves as the director or chair of the thesis or 
dissertation committee. 

Matriculation — The first semester of enrollment after admis- 
sion to a graduate program. 

Minor — A free-standing curricular component of a graduate 
program representing an academic discipline. This designa- 
tion verifies that scholarly expertise in the minor field has been 
achieved in addition to that attained in the major discipline. 

Plagiarism — The use or reproduction of material from an- 
other person's work (e.g., publications, productions, or intel- 
lectual property) without revealing the source and/or clearly 
acknowledging the degree of dependency. If materials are 
reproduced verbatim from another source, or even repro- 
duced in large part with only minor modification, proper ci- 
tation must occur. To avoid allegations of plagiarism, clearly 
cite the source and use quotations marks to identify the ex- 
cerpts, or clearly acknowledge the source by indenting and 
single-spacing the reproduced selections. 

Qualifying examination — An examination given to doctoral 
students to assess the level of mastery of knowledge in the 
discipline and in pedagogy. This examination determines if 
the doctoral student is qualified to continue as a candidate 
for the doctoral degree. Written portions of the examination 
are to be kept on file in the department for a period of five 
(5) years and the student has the right of access. The exami- 
nation is a milestone in academic achievement by a doctoral 
.student. (Master's and specialist's students, please see com- 
prehensive examination.) 

Readmission and reenrollment — Applications which must 
be filed if a graduate student breaks continuous graduate en- 
rollment. If granted, the student may reenroll for the identi- 
fied term. Readmission for non-degree seeking students is 
fairly routine. However, readmission for degree-seeking stu- 
dents is not guaranteed. The department should be consulted 
for its readmission policy. 

Repeat policy — The number of graduate courses possible for 
repetition for the purpose of grade replacement is limited to 
two. These two courses may not exceed 8 credit hours. 

Satisfactory progress — Successful advancementof a student 
toward his/her degree objective in the judgment of the fac- 
ulty and dean of the College of Graduate Studies. To be 
deemed as making satisfactory progress, a graduate student 
must maintain a cumulative CPA of 3.00 or greater and must 
successfully complete sufficient and appropriate graduate 
courses. These graduate courses must apply toward the gradu- 
ate curriculum in a manner consistent with completion of 
:he degree objective within the established time limit. 



70/30 Rule — A curricular stipulation for master's degree can- 
didates specifying that no more than 30 percent of the total 
degree hours may be dually listed as undergraduate/gradu- 
ate hours. Candidates with more than 30 percent of the de- 
gree program dually listed as undergraduate/graduate hours 
cannot graduate until the balance is attained. Normally, no 
more than 3 credits of thesis research (course 664) will be 
applied toward the minimum degree hour requirement. Care- 
ful curricular planning, in consultation with the graduate ad- 
visor, is essential. 

Specialization — A curricular component of a graduate pro- 
gram representing a well-recognized subset or branch of the 
discipline. A specialization does not appear on the student's 
graduate transcript. 

Stop-out — The period of time during which a student fails to 
register for successive academic sessions. If the stop-out pe- 
riod exceeds one academic year, the readmitted student may 
be required to fulfill degree requirements in existence at the 
time of readmission, rather than those at the original ma- 
triculation. 

Time limits — The time elapsed from matriculation during 
which a student is required to complete the degree objec- 
tive. Master's and specialist's students have six years from 
matriculation. Doctoral students have ten years from matricu- 
lation. These time limits are subject to extension, but only for 
compelling reason. If an extension is to be granted, it must 
be supported by the graduate program and approved by the 
dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 

Transfer credit — Coursework taken at other colleges and uni- 
versities which is formally transferred to the MTSU graduate 
record. In general, only course work taken while in graduate 
status prior to attending MTSU will be transferred and only if 
those courses were not used in partial satisfaction of degree 
requirements at the previous university. Transfer credit re- 
quires the approval of the graduate advisor and the dean of 
the College of Graduate Studies. 




24 



Admission to the 

College of Graduate Studies 



The University welcomes applications from individuals 
qualified for graduate study. Applications for admission 
may be obtained from the Graduate Office, Cope Ad- 
ministration Building 114, or from this catalog. Appli- 
cations for persons who are not U.S. citizens will be 
processed by the International Programs and Services 
Office, Cope Administration Building 202. In accepting 
admission to the College of Graduate Studies, a gradu- 
ate student assumes responsibility for knowing and com- 
plying with the regulations and procedures set forth in 
this catalog, as well as any amendments or revisions 
which may ensue. 

Graduate applicants must have earned a bachelor's 
degree from an accredited institution. Exceptions are 
those seeking the D.A. or Ed.S., which require a prior 
master's degree. However, under certain conditions un- 
dergraduate seniors with 98 semester hours of credit 
may be eligible to take graduate course work. (See the 
section on Graduate Courses below.) 

Applicants admitted to graduate programs as degree- 
seeking students are those working toward a graduate 
degree. Degree-seeking students must be recom- 
mended for admission by the graduate program/de- 
partment and approved by the dean of the College of 
Graduate Studies. 

Students not seeking a degree are classified as non-de- 
gree students. Non-degree-seeking students must be 
admitted to the College of Graduate Studies. Non- 
degree students may take courses for a reasonable pe- 
riod of time, as determined by the dean of the College 
of Graduate Studies. 

NOTE: Non-degree seeking students are not permitted to enroll in gradu- 
ate courses in the College of Business. 

All applicants to the College of Graduate Studies must 
have an overall undergraduate grade point average 
(GPA) of 2.75 (on a 4.00 scale) to be considered for 
unconditional admission. (Also see conditional admis- 
sion.) Applicants who attended graduate school at an- 
other institution must have a minimum cumulative GPA 
of 3.00 on all graduate work and a minimum of 2.75 on 
all undergraduate work to be considered for uncon- 
ditional admission. International students on an F-1 visa 
must meet requirements for unconditional admission. 

Admission as a Degree-Seeking Student 

All applicants wishing to pursue a graduate degree objective 
at MTSU must formally apply for admission to the College of 



Graduate Studies as degree-seeking students. At least four 
weeks prior to the anticipated date of registration, all degree- 
seeking applicants must submit the following materials to the 
Graduate Office: 

1 . an application for admission; 

2. an application fee; 

3. official transcripts certifying course work from each col- 
lege or university attended. Official transcripts must be 
mailed directly from the institution to MTSU and must 
be received prior to completion of the first semester of 
enrollment except for the M.B.A. and the M.S. in Ac- 
counting/Information Systems for which all transcripts 
must be received prior to enrollment. 

a. If the applicant obtained the bachelor's degree at 
MTSU, only transcripts of work not posted on the 
MTSU transcript will be required. 

b. If the applicant obtained the bachelor's degree at 
another institution, that latter transcript is required. 
Transcripts of work not posted on the baccalaureate 
transcript are also required. All post-baccalaureate 
transcripts are also required. 

c. If the applicant earned a graduate degree at another 
institution, that latter transcript is also required. Tran- 
scripts of all post-baccalaureate work not appearing 
on the graduate transcript are also required; 

4. letters of reference, if required by the graduate program. 
Please refer to the relevant graduate program informa- 
tion found on page 20 of this catalog; 

5. satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), or Graduate Man- 
agement Admissions Test (GMAT) tests. The GRE, MAT, 
or GMAT result is used in the evaluation of the academic 
qualifications of all graduate applicants. Each graduate 
program has identified a minimum combined GRE or 
MAT score (GMAT excepted) that it considers indicative 
of potential for a high level of academic performance. 
However admission decisions will be based on the over- 
all academic record of the applicant (particularly in com- 
parison with other applicants being accepted into the 
program), as well as other relevant materials such as let- 
ters of recommendation. 

NOTE: Both £75 and the CUE Board have advised that a combined 
CRE score should not be used as an absolute cutoff for admissions 
decisions, but rather should be used as part of an overall eva/ua- 
lion of applicants. The CRE Board statement reads: "A cutoff score 
based only on CRE scores should never be used as a sole crite- 
rion for denial of admission. " The College of Graduate Studies 
subscribes to this principle; 

6. all international applicants must score at least 525 on 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 85 
on the University of Michigan English Proficiency Exam 
(UMELI); 

7. international applicants on F and J visas must provii 
verification of financial support prior to admission, as n 



Admission to the College of Graduate Studies 25 



quired by the United States Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service. Further information may be obtained from 
the International Programs and Services Office. 

Each graduate program may have additional requirements 
including application deadlines. Applicants should refer to 
page 20 of this catalog, peruse the graduate program descrip- 
tion in this catalog, and/or contact the graduate advisor in 
the relevant department for specific requirements. 

An applicant not meeting University or program requirements 
for admission as a degree-seeking student may appeal to the 
individual department for special consideration. If recom- 
mended for admission by the department, the dean of the 
College of Graduate Studies has final approval or denial au- 
thority. 

Admission as a Non-Degree Student 

Admission to some graduate courses is made available to 
qualified applicants who wish to enhance their post-bacca- 
laureate education, yet who do not seek a graduate degree. 
Applicants wishing to be admitted as non-degree graduate 
students must: 

1 . complete an application for graduate admission; 

2. pay an application fee; 

3. submit an official transcript certifying receipt of the 
bachelor's or post-baccalaureate degree. 

International students on an F-1 visa may not be admitted to 
graduate study as non-degree students. 

Not all courses offered at the University are available for non- 
degree students. Information concerning eligibility for spe- 
cific graduate courses may be obtained from individual de- 
partments. 

NOTE: Non-degree seeking students are not permitted to enroll in gradu- 
ate courses in the College of Business. 

Non-degree-seeking students who wish to change to degree- 
seeking status must meet Graduate Studies' admission re- 
quirements and specific graduate program admission require- 
ments to be eligible for consideration. 

If transfer to degree-seeking status is approved, appropriate 
semester hours earned while a non-degree student may be 
applied toward a degree program if approved by the gradu- 
ate advisor and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 

Conditional Admission 

Occasionally degree-seeking applicants may not meet all the 
requirements necessary to be recommended for uncondi- 
tional admission. For example, they may have low under- 
graduate GPAs, lack some prerequisite courses, have low test 
scores, etc. However, the overall application materials may 
suggest there is substantial potential for academic success, 
thus making outright denial counterproductive. In these cases, 
temporary conditional admission into a graduate program 
may be granted by the dean of the College of Graduate Stud- 
ies, upon the recommendation of the graduate advisor. Con- 
tinuation in the program as a degree-seeking student is con- 



tingent upon fulfilling specific requirements stipulated in the 
conditional admission letter. In order to continue in the pro- 
gram, the written conditions must be completed within one 
year after matriculation. A registration hold will be placed on 
the student for the applicable term to ensure that the stated 
conditions are fully met. 

Admission of MTSU Faculty Members 
and/or Administrators 

Members of the faculty and/or administration of MTSU are 
eligible for admission to the College of Graduate Studies, just 
as any other applicant. They may not take over 6 semester 
hours of coursework during any semester. Faculty at the rank 
of assistant professor or higher or administrators of equiva- 
lent ranks may not be admitted to the doctoral program. If 
instructors who are in the D.A. program are appointed to 
assistant professor rank, they must discontinue the doctoral 
program. 

Graduate Courses 

Ordinarily only graduate students should register for courses 
numbered 500 or above, hiowever, any MTSU undergradu- 
ate student having completed 98 semester hours of under- 
graduate credit is eligible to take graduate courses. Students 
in Business Administration, Accounting, and Information Sys- 
tems are not eligible. 

Undergraduate students wishing to take graduate courses must 
obtain permission from the graduate program and the Office 
of Graduate Studies, CAB 114. Permission is not guaranteed. 
Not all graduate courses are offered to undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

Students may not enroll in 700-level courses in the depart- 
ments of Elementary and Special Education and Educational 
Leadership unless they are seeking an Education Specialist or 
Doctor of Arts degree. Non-degree seeking students are not 
permitted to enroll in 700-level courses. 




26 Admission to the College of Graduate Studies 



Readmission (Re-enrollment) 

The Graduate Office should be contacted for all matters con- 
cerning readmission, and applications may be obtained there. 
A readmission application is required from any student who 
missed one or more semesters, regardless of the reason for 
the "stop-out." (See glossary.) 

For non-degree-seeking post-baccalaureate students, read- 
mission is generally routine and is granted by the dean of the 
College of Graduate Studies, but it is not guaranteed. 

For degree-seeking students, readmission is not guaranteed. 
Each graduate program may have a specific readmission policy 
and should be contacted for information. Readmission re- 
quires the recommendation of the graduate program and 
approval by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 
Some graduate programs regularly allow readmission if the 
"stop-out" period is no more than one year; others are more 
restrictive. 



Re-enrollment Following Suspension 

Readmission of a suspended graduate student is not guaran- 
teed. If readmission is granted to a suspended student, 
reenrollment cannot occur until at least one term (exclusive 
of summer) has gone by. 

Auditing Courses 

An auditor is one who enrolls and participates in a course 
without expecting to receive academic credit. The same reg- 
istration procedure is followed and the same fees charged as 
for courses taken for credit. An audited course is not appli- 
cable to any degree or certificate. 

Regular class attendance is expected of an auditor. Students 
interested in auditing a course should discuss course require- 
ments with the instructor, prior to enrolling. Failure to meet 
course requirements may result in an auditor being removed 
from the course at the request of the instructor. A successful 
audit will be recorded on the transcript with the designation 
NC. Any petition to change from audit to credit or credit to 
audit must be processed by the last day to add a class. Re- 
quests to change from credit to audit after the deadlines must 
be approved by the dean, College of Graduate Studies. 

Hours After the Master's Degree 

The Tennessee Board of Education has ruled that teachers 
may count any graduate work received after the master's 
degree toward the next pay raise, per current guidelines. No 
credit will be given for repeated work. The student must re- 
quest the Office of Teacher Licensing to send proper creden- 
tials to the State Department of Education and/or to the ap- 
plicable local officials. 

Registration 

The schedule book contains information concerning registra- 
tion procedures. 



Student Identification Cards 

All students should have a permanent ID card with a mag- 
netic strip on the back. The card is required to receive a va- 
riety of services on campus including cashing checks, admis- 
sion to athletic and special events, admittance to the Recre- 
ation Center, checking out library materials, obtaining meal 
tickets, and using RAIDER FUNDS. The ID card will be vali- 
dated automatically when all fees are paid. All students must 
have an ID card. 

The first card is issued at no charge; however, there is a $1 
charge for replacing lost or stolen IDs. If the card breaks or is 
damaged, it should be returned to the ID office and a new 
card will be issued at no charge. 

Catalog 

This catalog is produced for the convenience and benefit of 
graduate applicants and enrollees and is revised every two 
years. In the interim period, changes in university and/or 
graduate program requirements may be approved which ap- 
ply to new applicants or admittees (see page 6 for additional 
information). Thus the information contained herein should 
not be construed as binding or inferred as an academic con- 
tract. New graduate students should requesta copy of gradu- 
ate program requirements in existence at the time of ma- 
triculation. These will be the requirements which must be 
fulfilled to result in conferral of the degree objective. Notwith- 
standing, should graduate requirements change while a stu- 
dent is still enrolled, he/she will have the choice of opting for 
the new requirements or following the original plan in exist- 
ence at matriculation, subject to any necessary substitutions. 




Expenses 



27 



The question of costs while attending the University is 
important to every student. It is difficult, however, to 
accurately estimate yearly expenditures; expenses vary 
according to the nature of the curriculum, the place of 
residence (whether in-state or out-of-state), and the 
student's own habits and needs. It is possible to live 
simply and to participate in the life of the student com- 
munity on a modest budget. The best help the Univer- 
sity can offer the student in budget planning is to pro- 
vide available figures for expenses. 

Health service and admission to athletic events are avail- 
able to any currently enrolled student. The payment of 
the appropriate fees will permit any combination of 
graduate and undergraduate courses to be taken that 
may be required or approved. Charges for all 
coursework will be assessed by course level. 

All fees are for the academic year 1 999-2000 and are 
subject to change by action of the Tennessee Board 
of Regents. The new fee amounts will be published 
each year when approved by the Tennessee Board of 
Regents (usually around July 1). The updated rates 
will be available in July on the MTSU web site at http:/ 
/www,mtsu.edu/~bursarmt. 

Housing fees are for 1999-2000, but are subject to 
TBR approval. 



Registration Fees 

Maintenance Fees 

In-State Students 

Full-time (per semester, 12 hours and over) $ 1,010.00 

Graduate (10 hours or more) 1,356.00 

I Part-time (per credit hour) 

Undergraduate 90.00 

Graduate 137.00 

Late Registration Fee 25.00 

' Out-of-state Students* 

Full-time Students (per semester, 1 2 hours and over) 
Undergraduate 3,568.00 

Graduate 3,914.00 

i Part-time Students (per credit hour) 

j Undergraduate 314.00 

Graduate 361 .00 

Late Registration Fee 25.00 

Debt Service Fee 

Full-time (per semester) 50.00 

f^rt-time (per credit hour) 4.00 

Technology Access Fee 

Full-time (per semester) 100.00 

Part-time (per credit hour) 8.00 



Student Activity Fee 

Full-time (per semester) 
Part-time (per credit hour) 

Recreation Activity Fee 

Full-time 
Part-time 



65.00 
5.00 



15.00 
15.00 



SCA Student Activity Fee (required of all students 

registering for 7 hours or more) 1 0.00 

'Included in these rates are charges for out-of-state tuition as follows: 

7. $2,558.00 for full-time students 

2. $224.00 per credit hour for part-time students 

Summer Registration Fees (Summer 2000) 

NOTE: Fees are charged per hour for all classes. NO maximum applies 

for summer 

In-State Students 
Undergraduate $ 90.00 per hour 

Graduate 1 37.00 per hour 

Out-of-State Residents 

Undergraduate 314.00 per hour 

Graduate 361 .00 per hour 

Debt Services Fee 4.00 per hour 

Technology Fee 8.00 per hour 

Recreation Fee (Non-refundable) 15.00 

Student Activity Fee $5.00 per hour 

Campus Housing Expenses 

Reservations 

Fall and Spring Semesters, required prepayment $200.00 

Spring Semester only, required prepayment $1 00.00 

Summer Session, required prepayment $125.00 

1999-2000 Room/Apartment Rates - Single Students Residence Halls 
(shared bedroom, quad bath; shared bedroom, community bath) 

Cost per semester $960.00 

Summer Session I $169.00 

Summer Session II $282.00 

Summer Session III $564.00 

Session IV $282.00 

All Summer School $733.00 
(private bedroom) 

All residence halls, per semester $1,680.00 
Limited availability; summer not available 

Abernathy, Ezell, and Womack Lane Apartments 
(shared apartment, shared bedroom) 

Cost per semester $1 ,090.00 

Summer Session I $192.00 

Summer II $321.00 

Summer III $642.00 

Summer IV $321.00 

All Summer School $834.00 



28 Expenses 



Womack Lane and Scarlett Commons 
(shared apartment, private bedroom) 
Womack Lane Apartments 

Cost per semester 
Summer I 
Summer II 
Summer III 
Summer IV 
All Summer School 

Scarlett Commons 

Cost per semester 
Summer I 
Summer II 
Summer III 
Summer IV 
All Summer School 

Womack Lane Apartments - Families 
(one bedroom, unfurnished) 

Cost per semester 

Summer I 

Summer II 

Summer III 

Summer IV 

All Summer School 

(one bedroom, semi-furnished) 

Cost per semester 

Summer I 

Summer II 

Summer III 

Summer IV 

All Summer School 

(two bedroom, unfurnished) 

Cost per semester 

Summer I 

Summer II 

Summer III 

Summer IV 

All Summer School 

(two bedroom, semi-furnished) 

Cost per semester 

Summer I 

Summer II 

Summer III 

Summer IV 

All Summer School 



$1,220.00 
$215.00 
$359.00 
$718.00 
$359.00 
$933.00 



$2,100.00 
$69.00 
$115.00 
$230.00 
$115.00 
$299.00 



$1,890.00 
$291.00 
$485.00 
$970.00 
$485.00 

$1,261.00 

$2,180.00 
$335.00 
$559.00 

$1118.00 
$559.00 

$1,453.00 

$2,151.00 
$331.00 
$552.00 

$1,104.00 
$552.00 

$1,435.00 

$2,441.00 
$376.00 
$626.00 

$1,252.00 
$626.00 

$1,628.00 



t^OTE: The rates quoted above are those in effect for the 1999-2000 
academic year. For the 2001-2002 academic year, a five (5) to ten (10) 
percent increase for inflation is lil<ely. Room rents are subject to change 
by action of the Tennessee Board of Regents. Each student will pay the 
amount in effect at the time of registration. The University reserves the 
right to correct errors in student fee assessments and charges which are 
discovered subsequent to initial billings and fee statements. Apartment 
summer sessions noted vi/ith an asterisk are available only to those resi- 
dents v\/ho have signed a license agreement and made prepayments for 
the subsequent academic year beginning in August. Residence hall sum- 
mer sessions are restricted to specific locations. 

Other Applicable Charges 

Admission application fee 

Undergraduate 15.00 

Graduate 25.00 

International 30.00 

Automobile registration — academic year: 

Faculty/administration/staff 65.00 

Open parking at core of campus 45.00 



Family Housing parking 45.00 

Perimeter parking 30.00 

Students and employees with disabilities 10.00 

Automobile registration — summer only: 

Faculty/administration/staff 33.00 

Open parking at core of campus 23.00 

Family Housing parking 23.00 

Perimeter parking 15.00 

Students and employees with disabilities 6.00 

Graduation fee, payable two months in advance of convocation: 

Associate 25.00 

Baccalaureate 30.00 

Master and Specialist 35.00 

Doctor of Arts 45.00 

Diploma insert (after the first) 10.00 

Dissertation binding (1 original and 4 copies) 

and microfilming (doctor's degree) 91.00 

Thesis binding (master's degree) (1 original and 3 copies) 37.00 

Extra copy thesis (or dissertation binding) 9.20 

Graduate entrance tests: 

Miller Analogies 33.00 

Graduate Record Exam 56.00 

Graduate Management Admission Test 70.00 

ID card replacement 10.00 

Music, individual instruction, 2 lessons each week 110.00 

1 lesson each week 55.00 

Nursery school, semester (4 days per week) 1 50.00 

Post Office box rent each semester (required of 

all students registering for 1 2 hours or more) 8.00 

Day Care Fees (per week) 

Full-time (M-F) $50.00 

Part-time (MWF) $30.00 

Part-time (TTH) $20.00 



No student will be allowed to pre-register, register, or receive 
a grade report or transcript of credits until all accounts are ; 
settled. A student will not be officially enrolled until all fees • 
are cleared through the Business Office. 

Late Registration 

Students who complete registration (including the payment I 
of fees) during the late registration period will be charged a i 
$25.00 late fee. 

Matriculation Fee for Incompletes 

If a student receives an "I" for a course, he or she need not 
re-register or pay fees for the course every semester until the 
course is completed. Such students should work only with 
the course instructor to complete grade requirements. 

Returned Checks 

Acknowledged bank errors excepted, a $20.00 service charge 
will be assessed for each bad check, whether given in pay- 
ment of fees, for purchase of books, cashed by the University 
for the personal convenience of the student, or for any other 
reason. The University will decline to accept checks from' 
any student who has checks returned by the bank more than 
once. An additional $25.00 will be assessed for any bad check 
given in payment of registration fees. 



Expenses 29 



Automobiles 

All privately-owned or operated vehicles for use on the cam- 
pus must be registered annually with Parking Services and 
must display an official registration permit (see above for 
charges). For more information or clarification, please refer 
to Traffic and Parking Regulations, available in the Parking 
Services Office. 



Auditing Charges 

An auditor is one who enrolls and participates in a course 
without expectation of receiving academic credit. The same 
registration procedure is followed and the same fees charged 
as for courses taken for credit. An audited course is not appli- 
cable to any degree or certification program. 

Regular class attendance is expected. Other course require- 
ments, which may be obtained in writing from the instructor, 
will vary depending upon the nature of the course. Students 
interested in auditing a course should discuss course require- 
ments prior to enrolling. Failure to meet course requirements 
may result in the auditor's being withdrawn from the course 
at the request of the instructor. A successful audit will be 
recorded on the transcript with the designation NC. 

A change from audit to credit or credit to audit must be pro- 
cessed by the last day to add a class. Graduate students who 
request to change after the deadline must receive approval 
by the department chair and the dean. College of Graduate 
Studies. 

Persons 60 years of age or older or disabled persons suffering 
from a permanent total disability which totally incapacitates 
such persons from working at an occupation which results in 
an income (T.C.A., Section 49-7-1 1 3) who are domiciled in 
Tennessee may audit courses at any state-supported college 
or university without paying tuition charges. Registration un- 
der this program is on a space-available basis; therefore, stu- 
dents cannot priority register. Class selection should be pro- 
cessed on the first day of classes for the term or session. Proof 
of age or disability must be provided. 

65-Year-Oid/DisabIed Credit Student 

Persons 65 years of age or older or disabled persons suffering 
from a permanent total disability which totally incapacitates 
such persons from working at an occupation which results in 
an income (T.C.A., Section 49-7-1 1 3) who are domiciled in 
Tennessee may register for classes for credit by paying a serv- 
ice fee not to exceed $75 per semester. Registration under 
this program is on a space-available basis; therefore students 
cannot priority register. Class selection should be processed 
on the first day of classes for the term or session. No late fee 
is charged. An application fee is required. In addition, the 
applicant must be eligible for admission and submit proof of 
age or disability. 



Additional Charges 

The University reserves the right to increase the charges listed 



herein or to add new ones whenever such increases or addi- 
tions are found to be necessary. 

Board 

All freshman men and women living in the residence halls 
during fall and spring semesters will be required to partici- 
pate in a freshman meal plan. All other students may secure 
meals in the University cafeterias or grill either through op- 
tional meal plans available from the food service or a meal- 
to-meal cash basis. 



Deferred Payment Plan 

Although all charges are due and payable in full at the begin- 
ning of each term, students in good financial standing at 
MTSU may defer payment of up to 50 percent of their regis- 
tration, housing, and freshmen meal plan fees for the fall and 
spring semesters. The deferred payment plan is not available 
for summer terms. 

To be eligible for the Deferred Payment Plan, each partici- 
pant must make a minimum down payment of 50 percent of 
the registration fees, residence hall rent, and freshmen meal 
plan costs. The balance due must be $400 or more after all 
discounts, waivers, financial aid, and other credits are 
applied. A student who fails to make timely payments in a 
previous term may be denied the right to participate in the 
deferred payment plan in future enrollment periods. A stu- 
dent who is denied participation may be allowed to partici- 
pate again only after completion of payment in full for two 
consecutive terms which allow deferments (fall or spring 
terms). Any student who makes payment with a check which 
is subsequently returned will be denied participation in the 
Deferred Payment Plan in all future terms. 

The amount deferred will be payable in two monthly install- 
ments. For the fall term, installment payments are due by 
October 1 and November 1. Payments for the spring term 
are due March 1 and April 1 . The University is not obligated 
to send reminder notices before the payment is due. Partici- 
pants in this plan must apply all discounts, waivers, credits, 
and financial aid, including student loans, toward payment 
of registration fees before a deferment will be considered. 
Financial aid and other credits received after the initial pay- 
ment will be applied to the remaining balance, and future 
amounts due will be recomputed. No refunds can be made 
until all fees are paid in full. Students who participate in the 
Deferred Payment Plan may not pay housing charges in in- 
stallments in the same term. Students must select either the 
Deferred Payment Plan or the Housing Deferment Plan. Stu- 
dents will not be withdrawn for failure to pay the second 
or third payments. However, the balance must be paid in 
full before the student can pre-register for future terms 
even if preregistration is prior to the due date. 

Each participant will be charged a $10.00 service fee each 
term to defray administrative costs. This fee is payable along 
with the 50 percent down payment on or before the registra- 
tion fee payment deadline. An additional late payment 
charge of $25 will be assessed for each installment not paid 



30 Expenses 



on or before the tenth day of the month that a payment is 
due. Students who make payments with checks that are re- 
turned will be charged a $20 return check service fee as well 
as any applicable late fees. 

If a payment is not received in the Business Office by the 
scheduled payment due date, the University will withhold all 
services from the student, including grades, transcripts, and 
future registration until the fees have been paid in full in- 
cluding any assessed late fees. 

All existing rules and policies pertaining to returned checks, 
refunds, withdrawals, dropped classes, and collection costs 
are applicable to the Deferred Payment Plan. 

Payment of the minimum amount due on the Deferred Pay- 
ment Plan finalizes registration. The class schedule will not 
be dropped. It is not necessary to also confirm on TRAM 
or WebMT. The Deferred Payment Plan service fee, late fee, 
and minimum amount are effective for 1 998-99 and are sub- 
ject to change in future terms. 

Additional fees for classes added after fee payment are due 
before the late registration fee payment deadline. Any un- 
paid fees after this date will be processed as a deferred pay- 
ment. The $10 Deferred Payment Plan service fee and any 
applicable $25 late payment fees will be charged. 

Questions regarding the Deferred Payment Plan should be 
directed to the Bursar's Office at (61 5) 898-2761 . 



Refund of Fees 

NOTE: No refund of housing fees, registration, or other fees 
will be made to students who are dismissed or suspended. 

Fall and Spring Semesters* 

Those students who withdraw from the University within 1 4 
calendar days after the beginning of classes for the fall and 
spring terms will be refunded 75% of their maintenance fees, 
debt service fee, student activity fee, and technology access 
fee or music fees (if any). Those withdrawing after the 14th 
day but before 25% of the time period covered by the term 
has passed will be refunded 25% of their fees. No refunds 
will be made beyond the 25% period. Specific dates for each 
term are given in the class schedule book for that term. The 
same refund schedule applies to students who drop to an 
hourly load below full-time. The percentage then applies to 
the difference between the new fees calculated on an hourly 
basis and actual fees paid. All other fees are non-refundable. 

Drop date for courses which meet for a shorter time period 
than normal will be prorated based upon the course drop 
dates for the full term. 



Summer* 

For summer sessions and other short terms, the 75% refund 
period and the 25% refund period will extend a length of 



time which is the same proportion of the term as the 75% 
and 25% are of the regular terms. 

Students who pre-register for a summer session course and 
find it necessary to drop or withdraw before the first day of 
class for that session will be refunded 100% for that course. 
Otherwise the regular refund schedule will apply. 

Specific dates applying to each session are listed in the cur- 
rent summer schedule book. 

*Students who register after the official registration period and with- 
draw from the University will have their refunds calculated as if regis- 
tration had taken place on the official day of registration. 

Refunds of Housing Expenses 

Residence Halls 

For 1 999-2000, applications for residence halls and on-cam- 
pus apartments must be accompanied by a pre-payment in: 
the amount of $200.00. Pre-payment is a security of good: 
faith that denotes the applicant's serious intent to reside in 
on-campus housing. Prepayment fees are $200.00, $1 00.001 
of which is applied toward fall semester charges, and $1 00.001 
of which is applied toward spring semester charges. This pre-: 
payment is refundable prior to check-in according to the fol- 
lowing schedule. All cancellations must be submitted in writ- 
ing to the Housing and Residential Life Office. Prepayment 
amounts represent 25% of the total semester fee and may 
vary from year to year. Students should contact Housing ana 
Residential Life to verify specific changes. 

Academic Year (Fall and Spring) Applications 

1999-2000 

Date of Cancellation Refund Amount 

By May 1 $150.00 

By June 1 $100.00 

By July 1 $ 50.00 
After July 1, but prior to the first check-in day 

in August $ 00.00 

Spring Semester Only Applications 2000 

Date of Cancellation Refund Amount 

ByOctoberlS $ 50.00 

After October 1 5, but prior to the first check-in 

day in January $ 00.00 

Summer Housing 

Details regarding application, fees, and refunds for summer 
assignment to residence halls and on-campus apartments may 
be obtained by contacting the Housing and Residential Life 
Office at (61 5) 898-2971. 

Housing Fees 

The refunds of residence hall fees after registration will be^ 
prorated on a weekly calendar basis when the student is forcedl 
to withdraw from the residence hall because of approved! 
medical reasons confirmed in writing by a licensed physi-| 



Full refund will be made in the case of death. No refund will 
be made other than under the above conditions, except asj || 
specified in the Student Housing Agreement. 



31 



Direct Deposit of Financial Aid 
Credit Balance Refunds 

Students who have a credit balance due to financial aid have 
the option of having the excess aid balance direct deposited 
into their checking or savings account. If financial aid has 
been credited to the student's account, the refund will be 
deposited into the student's bank account and available for 
use on the first day of refund disbursement if the student has 
met all financial aid eligibility requirements and/or completed 
all required paperwork. 

Students must complete an authorization form at least 14 
days prior to the first day of classes. Financial aid proceeds 
will not be transferred to the student's banking account with- 
out authorization. An authorization form can be obtained 
from the Business Office, Cope Administration Building, Cash- 
ier Window 9, or Room 103 or by calling (615) 898-5716. 
Direct Deposit Authorization Forms are available also via the 
web at http://v;^vw.mtsu.edu/~bursarmt/direct.html. 

This authorization will remain in effect until terminated by 
the student. 



Financial Aid 




The Office of Student Financial Aid, located in Cope 
Administration Building 218, provides assistance for 
qualified students. Office personnel will provide forms 
and help to seek available aid for graduate students. 
Possible sources follow: 

Federal Stafford Loan Program is a low-interest stu- 
dent loan. To apply for a Stafford loan, a student must 
have the results of his/her Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) on file, be attending at least five 
graduate hours, and be in good standing. Subsidized 
loans are based on need; maximum limit for a two- 
semester period is $8,500 (lifetime limit is $65,500 
which includes any undergraduate Stafford loans). 
Graduate students may qualify for additional 
unsubsidized Stafford loans up to $10,000 for a two- 
semester period (lifetime unsubsidized limit is $73,000). 
All loans are based on cost of attendance, estimated 
financial contribution (EFC), other aid received, and the 
above limits. Students may not be qualified for the full 
amount listed above. 

Federal Perkins Loan is a low interest loan from the 
federal government based on need. To apply for this 
loan, the student must have the results of his/her Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on file and 
be in good standing with the Financial Aid Office. 

Federal College Work-Study Program provides federal 
funding for campus work. To apply, students must have 
the results of their Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) on file, be attending at least five graduate 
hours, and be in good standing with the Financial Aid 
Office. Students are paid semi-monthly for hours worked 
up to 20 hours per week. 

Assistantships and Fellowships 

Limited numbers of graduate teaching assistantships, gradu- 
ate research assistantships, minority scholarships, and doc- 
toral fellowships are available. Applications may be obtained 
from the College of Graduate Studies or from the appropri- 
ate academic department. Information on stipends is also 
available from these sources. An individual is expected to be 
in good standing, i.e., having met the requirements for ad- 
mission to graduate school (including satisfactory test scores) 
and having a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or more. 



32 



Academic Regulations 



Academic Standards — 

Retention, Probation, and Suspension 

A master's or specialist in education student must maintain a 
cumulative CPA of at least 3.00 for all graduate work com- 
pleted at MTSU, as well as in the major, and a doctoral stu- 
dent must maintain a minimum CPA of 3.25. Six semester 
hours of C grade coursework may be applied toward a 
master's or specialist's degree, but no courses with a C grade 
are acceptable toward the doctorate. Courses with a grade 
lower than C may not be applied toward any graduate de- 
gree requirements. A graduate student failing to meet the 
applicable minimum cumulative graduate CPA retention stan- 
dard listed below or whose cumulative graduate CPA is less 
than 3.00 for three consecutive semesters will be placed on 
academic probation for the subsequent term. Probation in 
itself has no serious consequences other than to alert the stu- 
dent of potential academic problems and the requirement to 
(re)establish satisfactory academic status. Conversely, how- 
ever, suspension is quite serious. Should a suspended stu- 
dent not be readmitted, it would result in termination of the 
student's graduate status. 

In addition to minimum CPA standards, degree-seeking stu- 
dents are expected to take appropriate graduate courses to- 
wards their degree objective, as determined by the graduate 
program. Non-degree seeking graduate students are expected 
to take graduate courses. The number of "credit hours" listed 
below in bold applies only to those courses graded A through 
F, and not to S/U graded courses. 

NOTE: In addition to the guidelines below, the two-course repeat policy 
may result in a dramatically-increased CPA. 

The guidelines below represent the absolute minimum GPA 
to avert graduate academic probation status. However, a 
cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 3.00 is required 
for satisfactory academic progress at the graduate level. 

1-6 credit (quality) hours completed 2.00 CPA 

(If 6 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.00 re- 
flects a quality or grade point deficit of 6. Next term, unless a 
course is repeated, 3 or more hours of B grade, with no B- or 
lower grades, will generate a CPA greater than or equal to 2.33.) 

Greater than 6-9 credit (quality) hours completed 2.33 GPA 

(If 9 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.33 re- 
flects a grade point deficit of 6. Next term, unless a course is 
repeated, 3 or more hours of B grade, with no B- or lower grades, 
will generate a CPA greater than or equal to 2.50.) 

Greater than 9-12 credit (quality) hours completed 2.50 GPA 

(If 1 2 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.50 still 
reflects a grade point deflcit of 6. Next term, unless a course is 
repeated, 3 or more hours of B grade, with no B- or lower grades, 
will generate a CPA greater than or equal to 2.60.) 

Greater than 12-15 credit (quality) hours completed 2.60 GPA 

(If 1 5 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.60 still 
reflects a grade point deficit of 6. Next term, unless a course is 
repeated, 3 or more hours of A grade, with no B- or lower grades, 
will generate a CPA greater than or equal to 2.83.) 

Greater than 15-18 credit (quality) hours completed 2.83 GPA 

(If 1 8 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.83 re- 
flects a grade point deflcit of 3. Next term, unless a course is 



repeated, 3 or more hours of B grade, with no B- or lower grades, 
will generate a CPA greater than or equal to 2.85.) 

Greater than 18-21 credits (quality) hours completed .... 2.85 CPA 
(If 21 graduate hours have been completed, a CPA of 2.85 still 
reflects a grade point deflcit of 3. Next term, unless a course is 
repeated, 3 or more hours of A grade (or 3 hours of A- and 3 
hours of B + grades), with no B- or lower grades, will generate a 
CPA greater than or equal to 3.00 and the grade point deflcit 
will disappear) 

Greater than 21 credits (quality) hours completed 3.00 GPA 

(Master's and Educational Specialist students must maintain a 
cumulative CPA greater than or equal to 3.00 and Doctoral stu- 
dents must maintain a cumulative CPA greater than or equal to 
3.25 in all remaining terms.) 

A Student on academic probation who fails to meet the above 
applicable standard during the next term in which enrolled 
will be suspended. 
NOTE: Individual graduate programs may propose higher minimum 
grade standards than the above. 

Access to Records 

The MTSU policy concerning student access to educational 
records is printed on page 36. 

Advancement to Candidacy — Filing a Form 

In consultation with the graduate advisor, each degree seek- 
ing student must file a formal outline of the degree program 
on a Candidacy Form available at the Graduate Office. The 
Candidacy Form requires the approval of the major profes- 
sor, the reader(s), and the graduate analyst. A master's oi 
specialist's student may not register for more than 24 semes- 
ter hours unless an approved Candidacy Form is on file. Ir 
general, a doctoral student will not be permitted to registei 
for more than 24 semester hours unless an approved Candi- 
dacy Form is on file. 

NOTE: Some departments require advancement to candidacy prior tc 
the completion of 24 semester hours. 

Appeal of Academic Suspension 

A student may seek reversal of academic suspension, fo( 
cause, by petitioning the Graduate Council Appeals Com 
mittee. Appeal forms are available in the College of Cradu 
ate Studies, Cope Administration Building. Appellants shoulc 
contact the Graduate Office for the applicable deadline dates 

Appeals, Other 

Graduate students have the right to appeal for cause an; 
decision affecting their academic standing as a graduate stu 
dent. Cause excludes grade appeals, which are under th« 
purview of the MTSU Grade Appeal Committee. The Appea 
Advisory Committee of the Graduate Council is an ad ho( 
committee reporting to the dean of the College of Graduati 



Academic Regulations 33 



Studies. The committee is convened at the discretion of the 
dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 

The Graduate Council and the College of Graduate Studies 
have approved in principle the document Appeal Advisory 
Committee of the Graduate Council. Copies of this document 
are made available to all graduate students at the Graduate 
Student Orientation and are also available in the College of 
Graduate Studies, Cope Administration Building, Room 1 1 4. 

Candidacy — Changing a Form 

Changes in degree programs are permitted upon proper fil- 
ing and approval of a Change in Candidacy Form, which is 
available at the Graduate Office. 

Classes — Adding, Droppings 
or Changing Sections 

The procedures and deadlines to drop, add, or change a class 
are listed in the appropriate class schedule book. 

Classes — Cancellation of Scheduled Classes 

The minimum enrollment requirement is ten students for 
upper-division and 500-level graduate classes; eight students 
for 600-level classes, and four enrollees for 700-level classes 
(exclusive of graduate research courses). Any class may be 
canceled if the number of enrollees is deemed insufficient; 
however no scheduled class may be discontinued without 
the approval of the dean of the undergraduate college in which 
the course is offered. 



Examinations — Comprehensive (for Specialist's 
and Master's students; also see glossary) 

This examination is scheduled by each department during 
the time period designated by the Graduate Office. Normally 
the comprehensive examination may be taken no more than 
twice and failure to pass the comprehensive on the second 
attempt terminates one's degree program. Any exception to 
this "twice-only" rule must be recommended by the gradu- 
ate program and approved by the dean of the College of 
Graduate Studies. 



Examinations — Qualifying 

Please see the section under Doctor of Arts Degree and/or 
the Glossary. 



Examinations — Other 

Any graduate student may be required to take one or more 
additional tests designed to measure general educational 
achievement and/or achievement in selected major areas. 

Graduate credit may not be earned by CLEP or Special Ex- 
amination. 



Grades — Grading System 

The following notations are used by faculty of the University 
to indicate the quality of the work performed by students 
taking graduate courses: 

A, A- 
B+, B, B- 

c+, c, c- 

D+, D, D- 
F 

Grades That Do Not Influence Grade Point Average 

W - Withdrawal 
NC - No credit (audit) 
I - Incomplete 
S - Satisfactory 
U - Unsatisfactory 
P - Pass 

The P/F grade is given only in those courses with prior ap- 
proval to use pass/fail grading. Courses may be taught on a 
pass/fail basis only after approval of the Graduate Council. 
Course descriptions state if pass/fail grading applies. 

Pass or Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades are not used in de- 
termining the grade point average. However, they do count 
toward graduation credit requirements and are treated in ev- 
ery other respect as being equivalent to traditionally graded 
courses. 

The grade I indicates that the student has not completed all 
course requirements due to illness or other uncontrollable 
circumstances, especially those which may occur toward the 
close of the term. Mere failure to make up work or turn in 
required work on time does not provide a basis for the grade 
of I unless the extenuating circumstances noted above are 
acceptable to the instructor. When a student fails to appear 
for a final examination without known cause, the grade to be 
reported should be determined as follows: If the student has 
done satisfactory work to that point, the grade I may be re- 
ported on the assumption that the student was ill or will oth- 
erwise present sufficient reason for official excuse; if the stu- 
dent has attended irregularly and has not done satisfactory 
work to that point, the grade F should be reported. 

The "incomplete" must be removed during the succeeding 
semester, excluding summer. Otherwise, it converts to a grade 
of F A student should not make up the "incomplete" by reg- 
istering and paying again for the same course. The I grade 
carries no value until converted to a final grade. 

Grades — Appeal of Course Grades 

Student grievances concerning a course grade should be re- 
solved by arbitration between student and faculty. The ap- 
peal must occur within forty days of the graduation date for 
each term. If an impasse exists, either party may request the 
department chair to investigate the circumstances. Since these 
findings become a part of grievance records, the department 
chair will record the findings and send a copy to student and 



34 Academic Regulations 



faculty members. If the matter is not resolved at this level, 
the findings will then be forwarded to the dean of the college 
offering the course. If a resolution is not possible at this level, 
the dean will refer the matter to the Grade Appeals Commit- 
tee. The Grade Appeals Committee will receive documents 
and testimony regarding the circumstances, will record its 
findings, and make recommendations to the provost/vice 
president for academic affairs for a decision. The student may 
appeal an unfavorable decision to the president of the Uni- 
versity. 

Grades — Grade Point Average (Quality Credits) 

Grade points are numerical values assigned to letter grades 
in order to provide a basis for quantitative determination of 
grade (quality) point averages. The four-point system with 
pluses and minuses is used. 

The following system is used in determining grade point av- 
erage: 



Grade 




Grade Points 


A 


= 


4.00 


A- 


= 


3.67 


B-l- 


= 


3.33 


B 


= 


3.00 


B- 


= 


2.67 


C-t- 


= 


2.33 


c 


= 


2.00 


c- 


= 


1.67 


D-t- 


= 


1.33 


D 


= 


1.00 


D- 


= 


0.67 


F 


= 


0.00 



The scholastic standing of a student is expressed in terms of 
grade point average (GPA). A GPA is the total number of grade 
points divided by the total number of credit hours (exclusive 
of P S, and U credit hours) at Middle Tennessee State Univer- 
sity, plus any transferred course work. For a grade of F, the 
credit hours count, but zero grade points are earned. 

Intent to Graduate 

An Intent to Graduate Form, available at the Graduate Of- 
fice, must be filed by the student no later than the first week 
of the semester in which the student plans to graduate or no 
later than the end of the first week of summer Session II (for 
August graduation). 

Prerequisites 

The prerequisite for the graduate major is an undergraduate 
minor or its equivalent and/or the recommendation of the 
department chair. The prerequisite for the graduate minor is 
1 2 semester hours of undergraduate course work in that area 
or its equivalent and/or the recommendation of the depart- 
ment chair or delegate. If prerequisite course work is margin- 
ally deficient, the student may be admitted to the College of 
Graduate Studies to make up the deficiencies concomitantly 



while taking graduate courses. Prerequisite courses do not 
apply toward meeting graduate program requirements. 

Repeated Courses 

A graduate student may repeat graduate courses in which a 
grade lower than B- was earned. However, there are certain 
restrictions and limitations. A maximum of two courses, not 
to exceed eight credits combined, may be repeated for a 
grade change, i.e., the grade in the second attempt replaces 
the grade in the first attempt. If a third or subsequent course 
is repeated by the student, there will be no grade replace- 
ment; i.e., all attempts will be used in the grade point aver- 
age calculation. All attempts are recorded on the transcript. 

Graduate students may not repeat a course in which they 
have previously earned the grade of A or B without written 
approval from the graduate advisor and dean of the College 
of Graduate Studies. If granted, both the original and repeated 
grades will count in the GPA calculation. 

Student Load 

A student's enrollment status is determined by the number 
of credit hours taken per term according to the following: 

Full-time - 9 graduate hours 

Three-quarter time - 7 graduate hours 

One-half time - 5 graduate hours 

Graduate students are limited to a maximum of 1 2 graduate 
hours per semester. If an exception is requested, overload 
forms must be signed by the graduate advisor and the dean 
of the College of Graduate Studies. Full-time status for stu- 
dents holding graduate assistantships is six (6) graduate se- 
mester hours. (This is not applicable to students receiving 
veterans benefits.) 

Teacher Licensure 

All applications for professional teaching licenses in Tennes 
see must be filed with the dean of the College of Education 
and Behavioral Science who is responsible for recommend- 
ing each applicant from this University. All applicants for 
teacher licensing should furnish the Tennessee State Depart- 
ment of Education a report of scores attained on the Core 
Battery Tests of the National Teacher Examinations. A copy 
of the scores should be sent to the Office of the Dean, Col- 
lege of Education and Behavioral Science. MTSU verification 
of the scores will be forwarded with the Application for Li- 
censure. 

Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program 

The post-baccalaureate teacher education program is de- 
signed for individuals who have completed baccalaureate 
degrees but who did not complete teacher preparation. The 
College of Education and Behavioral Science requires candi- 
dates to address any course and program deficiencies in their 
undergraduate education to ensure the attainment of the 



Academic Regulations 35 



knowledge and skills required in general education, profes- 
sional education, and the major for the teaching field. Addi- 
tional coursework and program requirements will be deter- 
mined by the teacher licensure analyst. Transcript analysis 
forms for the post-baccalaureate program are available in the 
McWherter Learning Resources Center 1 73. 

Post- baccalaureate students must also make formal applica- 
tion for admission to the teacher education program. Admis- 
sion to teacher education is a prerequisite to enrollment in 
upper-division courses in Elementary Education (ELED), Read- 
ing (READ), Special Education (SPED) (except SPED 301), 
Foundations of Education (FOED), or Youth Education (YOED). 



Time Limits 

Students have six years after the date they matriculate to com- 
plete the requirements for a master's or specialist's degree. 
There is a ten-year time limit, after matriculation, to com- 
plete all requirements for the Doctor of Arts degree. Excep- 
tions to these time limitations, for good cause, will be con- 
sidered by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies when 
recommended by the graduate advisor and department chair. 

Transcripts 

Student and official copies of student's record are furnished 
free of charge upon written request by the student. No tran- 
script will be provided for a student who has any financial 
indebtedness to the University or who has not completed 
admission procedures. Official transcripts from other institu- 
tions must be obtained directly from those institutions. 

Transfer Credit 

In general, only coursework taken while in graduate status, 
prior to attending MTSU, will be transferred and only if those 
courses were not used in partial satisfaction of degree re- 
quirements at the previous university. Coursework transferred 
or accepted for credit toward a graduate degree must repre- 
sent graduate coursework relevant to the degree, with course 
content and level of instruction resulting in student compe- 
tencies at least equivalent to those of students enrolled in the 
institution's own graduate degree programs. Transfer credit 
requires the recommendation of the graduate advisor and 
approval of the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. 

No graduate credit may be obtained by correspondence or 
work experience. A maximum of 1 2 semester hours of resi- 
dence credit (6 in the major area) may be transferred and 
applied on a master's or specialist's degree. 

In the doctoral program, no more than 1 2 semester hours 
(only 6 semester hours in the major) beyond the master's 
degree may be transferred from other doctoral institutions. 



Withdrawing from the University 

Students finding it necessary to withdraw (completely sepa- 
rate) from the University after having selected classes for a 
future term should use the Telephone Response at Middle 
(TRAM), (615) 898-2000, or WebMT, http://www.mtsu.edu, 
to drop all classes. A student may also initiate the official 
withdrawal process in Keathley University Center 1 30. Con- 
sult the class schedule book for each term to determine 
whether withdrawal should be accomplished by TRAM or 
WebMT or through the associate dean of Student Life. Once 
classes have begun for the summer term, withdrawal for that 
summer term cannot be accomplished via TRAM or WebMT. 

The Records Office will be notified of the withdrawal and 
will notify each of the student's professors regarding the with- 
drawal and its effective date as determined by the associate 
dean of Student Life. 

The grade for a student who officially withdraws from the 
University will be determined by the student's academic per- 
formance prior to withdrawal. Withdrawal early in a term 
may result in no grades being assigned to the student. (The 
current schedule of classes carries dates governing withdrawal 
and appropriate grades.) 

A student may not officially withdraw from the University 
after a date in the semester or term which is one week or less 
prior to the beginning of final examinations, except for rea- 
sons of mitigation or extenuation as shall be determined by 
the associate dean of students. 

Any student who leaves the Un iversity without officially with- 
drawing will receive a grade of F for all work attempted. 

A student under certain conditions may receive an adminis- 
trative withdrawal from a single course or courses. Similar 
procedures are provided for a total severance from the Uni- 
versity if conditions warrant. The following policy will deter- 
mine the eligibility for an administrative withdrawal: The entry 
of W indicates that the student has been withdrawn from a 
course without reflection of grades. The entry of W results 
from a situation involving extreme extenuating circumstances 
as identified and originated with the University physician or 
counselors at the Counseling and Testing Center and/or the 
associate dean of students. The entry of W will be accom- 
plished only with the full knowledge and written concurrence 
of the faculty member concerned. 



36 



Student Access to Educational Records 



Definitions 

Educational Records are those records, files, documents, and other 
materials which (1) contain information directly related to a student; 
and (2) are maintained by Middle Tennessee State University or by a 
person acting for the University. "Records" means information recorded 
In any medium, including, but not limited to, the following: handwrit- 
ing, print, tapes, film, microfilm, and microfiche. Educational records 
do not include (1) personal notes, (2) records available only to law 
enforcement personnel, (3) employment records, (4) medical and psy- 
chiatric records (these are accessible by the student's physician). 

A student is any person who is or has been enrolled at Middle Tennes- 
see State University. An applicant who does not enroll or who is de- 
clared ineligible has no inherent right to inspect his or her file. Wher- 
ever "student" is used in reference to personal rights, an eligible par- 
ent of a dependent student has similar rights. This "eligible" parent is 
one who has satisfied Section 1 52 of the Internal Revenue Code of 
1 954 and who presents such proof to the custodian of the educational 
records. Normally this proof will be a certified copy of the parent's 
most recent Federal Income Tax Form. 

Directory information includes the student's name, address (including 
e-mail), telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, 
enrolled hours, student level (freshman, sophomore, etc.) participa- 
tion in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of 
members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards 
received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institu- 
tion attended by the student. A student may request that such direc- 
tory information not be released to anyone other than those persons 
defined as school officials. To do so, a Request for Non-Release of 
Directory Information must be signed in the Records Office, Cope Ad- 
ministration 106. 

The request is valid until the student completes a Cancellation of Re- 
quest for Nonrelease of Directory Information form at the Records 
Office or until enrollment ceases at MTSU. If the student re-enrolls 
and does not want directory information released, another Request 
for Nonrelease of Directory Information form must be completed. 

A school official is a person employed by the university as an adminis- 
trator, instructor, supervisor, or support staff member. 

A legitimate educational interest exists if the official needs to review 
an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional respon- 
sibility. 

Having access to an educational record means being allowed to see 
the original record. 

Release of Personally Identifiable Student Educational Records 

Middle Tennessee State University shall not permit access to, or the 
release of, any information in the educational records of any student 
that is personally identifiable, other than directory information, with- 
out the written consent of the student, to any party other than the 
following: 

1 . MTSU officials and staff who have legitimate educational interests; 

2. officials of other schools in which the student seeks admission; 

3. appropriate persons in connection with a student's application for, or re- 
ceipt of, financial aid; 

4. federal or sUte officials as defined in paragraph 99.37 of the Family Edu- 
cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974; 

5. state and local officials authorized by state statute; 

6. organizations conducting studies for, or on the behalf of, MTSU for the 
purpose of assisting in accomplishing the University's stated goals, when 
such information will be used only by such organizations and subsequently 
destroyed when no longer needed for the intended purpose; 

7. accrediting organizations, to carry out their functions; 

8. parents of a dependent student as defined in section 1 52 of the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1954 (Written consent may be allowed from either of 
these separated or divorced parents subject to any agreement between 



the parents or court order. In the case of a student whose legal guardian is 
an institution, a party independent of the institution, appointed under 
state and local law to give parental consent, may be allowed to do so.); 

9. in compliance with judicial order or subpoena, provided that the student 
is notified in advance of the compliance unless the issuing court or agency 
has ordered that the existence or the contents of the subpoena or the 
information furnished not be disclosed; or 

10. appropriate persons in connection with an emergency if such knowledge 
is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other persons. 

NOTE: With the exception of MTSU officials and staff who have been 
determined by the University to have legitimate educational interests, 
all individuals and agencies who have requested or obtained access to 
a student's record (other than directory information) will be noted in a 
record which is kept with each student's Educational Record. A request 
must be in writing stating the purpose of the request. This record will 
also indicate specifically the legitimate interest that the persons or agency 
had in obtaining the information. 

Procedures for Accessing Educational Records 

Eligible students have a right to inspect and review their educational 
records. To do so the student must request the custodian make the 
records available. The student may ask for an explanation and/or a 
copy of the record. (The price of the copies shall not exceed the cost 
of duplicating the record.) The records shall be made available within 
45 days from the request. After consultation with the custodian the 
student may seek amendment of the records the student believes to 
be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's 
privacy rights. If there is a disagreement between the student and the 
custodian as to the correctness of the data contained in the record, the 
student may submit a request for a formal hearing. The request and 
the formal challenge to the content of the records must be presented 
in writing to the chair of the Student Appeals Committee. The chair 
shall call a meeting no later than 45 days after receipt of the written 
appeal and challenge. The committee will allow the student to present 
evidence to substantiate appeal and shall render a written decision to 
the student within 45 days after the meeting. 

Complaints of alleged failure of the institution to comply with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be filed with the Family Policy 
Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Av- 
enue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605. 

NOTE: This procedure does not provide for a hearing to contest an 
academic grade. 

Exclusions 

Right of access does not include 

1 . financial records of parents or any information therein; 

2. confidential letters and statements of recommendation which were 
placed in the educational record of a student prior to January 1, 
1975; 

3. records to which access has been waived by a student. (This ap- 
plies only if a student, upon request, is notified of the names of 
all persons making confidential recommendations and if such rec- 
ommendations are used solely for the purpose they were in- 
tended.) 

Destruction of Educational Records 

Educational records may be destroyed except that a student shall be 
granted access prior to destruction if such is requested. 

Informing Students 

MTSU informs its students of the policy governing privacy rights of 
students' educational records by publishing the policy in the university 
catalogs. A //s(/ng of the types of records and related Information may 
be found in the undergraduate catalog. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



braduate degrees are planned to help fulfill specific 
purposes. The Doctor of Arts degree is offered to edu- 
cate university, community college, and junior college 
teacher/scholars in the fields of English, history, chemis- 
try, economics, and physical education. The Specialist 
in Education degree is offered to educate administra- 
tors, teachers, and counselors at advanced levels for el- 
ementary and secondary schools. 

Four degrees — the Master of Education, the Master of 
Arts in Teaching, the Master of Science in Teaching, and 
the Master of Business Education — are offered to edu- 
cate public school teachers, supervisors, counselors, and 
administrators. The Master of Arts and the Master of 
Science degrees are offered to prepare candidates for 
further graduate study and research, for teaching at the 
junior college level, for professional positions in a vari- 
ety of fields, and for positions of leadership with state 
and federal agencies. The Master of Vocational-Techni- 
cal Education is offered to prepare leaders in the vo- 
cational educational field. The Master of Business Ad- 
ministration is offered to prepare candidates for lead- 
ership positions in business and industry, and the 
Master of Criminal Justice is offered to prepare lead- 
ers in the criminal justice system. 



f r>ji>r ^. 



o 




38 



Doctor of Arts 
Degree 



Middle Tennessee State University offers the Doctor of Arts 
(D.A.) degree in Chemistry, Economics, English, History, and 
Physical Education. An applicant for admission to this degree 
program must hold a master's degree from an accredited in- 
stitution. The D.A. degree is offered for the purpose of devel- 
oping doctoral-level expertise combining pedagogy with schol- 
arly achievement (applied or theoretical) and research excel- 
lence in the fields of chemistry, economics, English, history, 
and physical education. The D.A. recipient is well prepared 
to teach at the collegiate level, including fulfilling professorial 
and similar advanced teaching positions. Above all, the D.A. 
recipient is a learned person who has demonstrated advanced 
educational leadership skills combined with the capacity to 
conduct independent scholarly investigation. 

Programs Leading to the D.A. Degree 

There are two alternatives, as described below. 

Alternative I: Single Teaching Field 

48 semester hours above the master's level with at least two- 
thirds of the program on the 700 level. No more than 6 se- 
mester hours of dissertation research (course 764) may apply 
to this 48-hour requirement. 500-level courses may not be 
applied. 

a. The major (teaching field) includes at least 24 semester 
hours of course work, plus 6 semester hours of intern- 
ship/externship, plus at least 6 semester hours for the 
dissertation research (course 764). 

NOTE: Once a doctoral student has begun taking dissertation re- 
search, he/she is expected to enroll in at least 1 semester hour of 
dissertation research until the dissertation is completed. Thus, 
doctoral students normally enroll for more than 6 semester hours 
of dissertation research. 

b. The professional education core consists of at least 12 
semester hours in higher education and must include 
courses FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

Alternative II: Two Teaching Fields 

60 semester hours above the master's level with at least two- 
thirds of the program on the 700 level. No more than 6 se- 
mester hours of dissertation research (course 764) may apply 
to this 60-hour requirement. 500-level courses may not be 
applied. 

a. The major (first teaching field) includes at least 18 se- 
mester hours of course work in the field (i.e., chemistry, 
economics, English, history, or physical education); plus 
6 semester hours of internship/externship, plus at least 6 
semester hours for the dissertation research (course 764). 
NOTE: Once a doctoral student has begun taking dissertation re- 
search, she/he is expected to enroll in at least 7 semester hour of 
dissertation research until the dissertation is completed. There- 
fore doctoral students normally register for more than 6 semester 
hours of dissertation research. 



b. The second teaching field consists of at least 1 8 semester 
hours of coursework in any discipline which has a master's 
program (except Administration and Supervision, Cur- 
riculum and Instruction, or Aerospace Education). 
The fields of study from which the second teaching field 
may be selected are: 
Accounting/Information Health, Physical Education, 

Systems Recreation 

Aerospace Administration History 

Biology Human Sciences 

Business Administration Industrial Studies 

Business Education Mass Communication 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Computer Information Systems Music 
Computer Science Psychology 

Criminal Justice Reading 

Economics School Counseling 

English Sociology 

Exercise Science and Special Education 

Health Promotion Vocational-Technical 

Foreign Languages Education 

c. The professional education core consists of at least 1 2 

semester hours in higher education and must include 

courses FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

Advisory Committee 

Each D.A. student has a three-person advisory committee 
constituted by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies; 
two are from the major field and one from higher education, 
The committee is recommended by the student, in consulta- 
tion with the graduate advisor. If a curriculum comprising a 
major teaching field and a secondary teaching field is cho 
sen, a fourth member representing the secondary field is ap 
pointed. If warranted, the committee membership may be 
reconstituted upon the approval of the dean of the College 
of Graduate Studies. 

Beginning with acceptance into the doctoral program, the 
student should meet frequently with the advisory commit- 
tee. The committee provides academic guidance to formu- 
late a curricular plan best suited for the needs and interests 
of the student. The pre-candidacy stage permits optimal flex- 
ibility in the event of modified academic interests. Once the 
student has a well-formulated plan, he/she should petition h 
for advancement to candidacy. Advancement to candidaq^ le 
must occur by the completion of 36 semester hours 
coursework. (See advancement to candidacy, below.) 

Advancement to Candidacy 

After having successfully completed a significant component "' 
of the curriculum (not to exceed 36 semester hours and in- 
cluding at least one course in the major and one in higher L 
education), the student must file a Candidacy Form with the 
dean of the College of Graduate Studies. This degree plan,' luf 
approved by the student's advisory committee, is listed on 
the Candidacy Form. The Graduate Office will notify the ap' 
plicant after the degree plan has been approved. A student 
may not take the qualifying examination unless he/she has 
been advanced to candidacy. 



Doctor of Arts Degree 39 



Qualifying Examinations 

The qualifying examinations are intended to assess whether 
a candidate is qualified to continue in a doctoral program. At 
the appropriate point in the doctoral program, following ad- 
vancement to candidacy, the candidate must pass written and 
oral qualifying examinations. D.A. programs generally require 
that the qualifying examinations be taken during the last se- 
mester of prescribed course work exclusive of dissertation 
research. 

These examinations are given at least one month before the 
close of the fall and spring semesters and summer session. 

A satisfactory or passing performance on both the written 
and oral examinations means that the candidate is qualified 
to continue the program as planned. A less than satisfactory 
outcome on any phase(s) of the qualifying examination may 
result in additional academic requirements and/or a re-ex- 
amination. A re-examination may be given only once. A sec- 
ond failing performance results in a recommendation to the 
dean of the College of Graduate Studies for academic dis- 
nissal. The student may appeal the dismissal recommenda- 
:ion, for cause, to the dean of the College of Graduate Stud- 
es. 

tiVritten Qualifying Examination 

1 . For Alternative #1 , the written examination encompasses 
the candidate's major teaching field and higher educa- 
tion. The purpose of the written examination is to evalu- 
ate the candidate's overall knowledge of the field, inte- 
grative skills, ability to organize material, and compe- 
I tency in written expression. The maximum time limit for 
I the written examinations is 1 2 hours: 8 hours in the major 
I field and 4 hours in the higher education component. 
?. For Alternative #2, an additional maximum 4-hour ex- 
amination in the second teaching field is required. 
I. The examinations are administered by the major depart- 
ment and by higher education. 
The graded examinations are filed in the department of- 
fice for a period of five (5) years, and the student has the 
right of access to his/her graded examination. 



Dral Qualifying Examination 

'he oral examination is given by the candidate's advisory 
■ommittee and covers the candidate's field of specialization 
nd general knowledge. The committee evaluates the 
andidate's breadth of knowledge of the field(s), integration 
nd problem-solving skills, competency in oral expression, 
nd potential for conducting independent scholarly investi- 
,ation. 

dissertation Information 

rospectus 

.. The presentation of the dissertation prospectus is sched- 
uled by the student, in consultation with the dissertation 
committee, as soon as practicable so as to enable the 
candidate to get a timely start on the research phase of 
the dissertation. In no event shall the prospectus pre- 
sentation precede advancement to candidacy. 



2. The prospectus must be distributed to all members of 
the dissertation (advisory) committee at least one week 
prior to the scheduled presentation. 

3. The presentation of the dissertation prospectus is open 
to faculty. 

4. The dissertation committee may impose additional con- 
ditions, such as requiring extra statistical analyses, revi- 
sion of protocols, or knowledge of a foreign language 
appropriate for the dissertation research. 

5. If relevant, the committee provides the candidate with 
procedures for requesting consent and clearance by the 
MTSU Institutional Review Board. 

6. Immediately upon completion, the committee orally in- 
forms the candidate of its decision on the prospectus. 
The committee then provides the candidate with a writ- 
ten synopsis of the decision, including any applicable 
additional requirements, so as to minimize potential mis- 
understandings. 

Preparation of the Prospectus 

The prospectus need not conform to a set series of conditions 
since each research investigation is unique. The dissertation 
committee should be consulted when the candidate is pre- 
paring the prospectus. However, the following may prove 
useful as guidelines: 

Research Statement. This is a brief statement about the purpose of 
the research and the rationale for the study. It may also include refer- 
ence to projected social, literary, or scientific impact, etc., to be real- 
ized by the study. Also Included might be a brief description of the 
major subdivisions or aspects of the proposed study, stated in general 
terms. 

Hypothesis. A hypothesis is a tentative assumption of an anticipated 
outcome from among projections of (all) possible outcomes of a re- 
search Investigation. The hypothesis Is based on presumably valid con- 
clusions and backed by previous scholarly evidence; i.e., there is a 
rationale for the hypothesis. The scholar's goal is to prove, or disprove, 
the hypothesis. 

Research Protocol or Experimental Design. This is the methodology 
devised by the researcher to examine whether or not the hypothesis is 
correct. The methodology or testing is performed so as to generate 
data (facts) which are used either to prove or disprove the hypothesis. 
A note of caution — when data are generated which disagree with an 
investigator's hypothesis, a tendency of many young scholars is to at- 
tempt to explain why the data are Incorrect, since they don't fit the 
hypothesis. It is very Important to accept the validity of one's data and, 
if necessary, generate a new hypothesis which then may be further 
examined. 

Background and Significance of the Study. The theoretical and empiri- 
cal framework of prior scholarly work related to the research proposal 
and to which the proposal Is indebted should be determined. A short 
statement of the value of the study and of the possible applications of 
the results is advisable. Citation of a limited number of authorities may 
support the significance of the proposed study. 
Definition of Terms. Technical terms or words and phrases having spe- 
cial meanings should be defined. 

Basic Assumptions. Certain defensible assumptions may be necessary 
to reach a scholarly conclusion. A justification should be provided ex- 
plaining the basis for any assumption made. 

Data Collection (Materials and Methods). A complete, precise descrip- 
tion should be given for all Instruments, materials, devices, or sources 
of information used in the collection of data or generation of informa- 
tion. There should be a detailed step-by-step description of the ways 
in which data are to be collected (I.e., methodology). This description 
should include detailed Information of the data to be collected, the 



40 Doctor of Arts Degree 



sources to be used, sampling procedures, if any, and any other infor- 
mation necessary to further clarify the procedure. 
Data Analysis. It is necessary to describe precisely and specifically the 
way in which data are to be organized and analyzed, the steps and 
techniques used to analyze and interpret the data should be clearly 
described. 

The Dissertation 

Each dissertation is unique and reflects the academic accom- 
plishments of the author, in consultation with the disserta- 
tion committee. Although the candidate should confer fre- 
quently with the dissertation committee for mentoring and 
advice, the dissertation is the primary means by which the 
candidate demonstrates proficiency as an independent 
scholar. Following are some guidelines that may prove use- 
ful: 

1. The dissertation (research project) should be strongly 
based upon the discipline, but it should also have rel- 
evance to pedagogy. 

2. The research may be a restudy of problems with varia- 
tions in new and different settings, a reevaluation of prior 
research, or the generation of new and original scholarly 
information. 

3. The research should combine creativity with originality. 

4. For additional information, the student may wish to con- 
sult the Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Disserta- 
tions, produced by the Tennessee Conference of Gradu- 
ate Schools. It is available for perusal in the Office of 
Graduate Studies. 

Defense of Dissertation — Final Examination 

1 . Upon completion of the dissertation, the dissertation 
committee will hold an oral examination (often called 
the dissertation defense), which deals with the disserta- 
tion. However, the committee may designate any other 
aspect of the candidate's program for examination. 

2. Arrangements for this examination are made by the stu- 
dent, in consultation with the major professor. 

3. This oral examination may be open to the public. 

4. The defense of dissertation is normally held during the 
same semester as the anticipated conferral of the de- 
gree. 

5. The dean of the College of Graduate Studies must be 
notified by the major professor, in writing, of the out- 
come of the final examination/dissertation defense. 

Filing the Dissertation 

1 . The completed dissertation should follow a general for- 
mat as outlined by the College of Graduate Studies; how- 
ever there is considerable flexibility so that the author 
may use a format consistent with that of leading journals 
representative of the discipline. 

2. Before submission to the dean of the College of Gradu- 
ate Studies, the completed dissertation must be approved 
by the entire advisory committee and the department 
chair in the following order: major advisor, second mem- 
ber from the major field, professor of higher education, 
and chair of the major department. When a second teach- 
ing field is involved (alternative #2), that advisor's name 
should be inserted prior to that of the professor of higher 
education. 



3. The completed dissertation must be filed in the office of 
the dean of the College of Graduate Studies by the dead- 
line set for accepting theses, dissertations, and research 
projects. The deadline(s) are found in the calendar sec- 
tion of this catalog and in the current class schedule book. 

4. Upon receipt of the original and four copies of the dis- 
sertation by the Office of Graduate Studies, they are sent 
to the bindery. Each of the five approval pages must bear 
original signatures. Two copies are filed in the MTSU Li-' 
brary. One copy will be filed in the major department, 
one with the major professor, and one with the candi- 
date. Laser print may be used if it is of professional qual- 
ity. Letter grade copy paper will suffice; the copies need 
not be on bond paper. 

Dissertation Abstract 

The dissertation must include an abstract of the treatise which, 
should not exceed 350 words. 



Other Information 

In addition to the materials found below, the reader should i 
refer to the Glossary section in this catalog for additional im- 
portant information relative to graduate education at MTSU. 

Checklist for the 

Semester of Intended Graduation 

1 . By the end of the first full week of the term or by the end 
of the first week of Session II (for August graduation), the 
candidate files an Intent to Graduate Form with the Col- 
lege of Graduate Studies and graduation fees are paid 
There is an additional charge if more than five copies oi 
the dissertation are to be bound. 

2. The final examination (oral defense of dissertation) is ad 
ministered. 

3. If the defense is satisfactory, the dissertation is filed with 
the Graduate Office no later than 30 days prior to tht 
intended graduation date. Final authority for approval oi 
the dissertation rests with the dean of the College a 
Graduate Studies. 



Time Limit 

After matriculation, there is a ten-year time limit for coi 
pleting all D.A. degree requirements. 



Tlf 



Transfer Credits 

Only course work completed at a doctoral institution tha 
would count toward the doctorate there will be considerec 
for approval as transfer credit toward the Doctor of Arts courst 
work requirement at MTSU. Additional information on trans 
fer credit is given in the section on academic regulations. 



41 



General Information 
for Specialist's and 
Mcister's Students 



In addition to the materials found below, the reader 
should refer to the Glossary section in this catalog for 
additional important information relative to graduate 
education at MTSU. 



must be approved by the major professor, reader(s), and/or 
faculty advisors. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The comprehensive examinations are scheduled by each 
department during the last part of the semester in which the 
student expects to graduate. These may be oral, written, or 
both. This test is not merely a re-examination of course work, 
but it is an assessment of the candidate's ability to integrate 
scholarly information linking the major and related fields. The 
comprehensive examinations may be taken no more than 
twice. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements for de- 
cree-seeking students and submit any additional materials 
required by the major program of study. (See relevant de- 
partment for specific requirements.) 

Admission is granted to a specific program of study and a 
student may not change the major, the concentration, or the 
minor without a recommendation by the relevant graduate 
advisor(s) and the written approval of the dean of the College 
Df Graduate Studies. 

Ml applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited university. In addition, applicants for the Ed.S. degree 
Tiust also hold a master's degree from an accredited university. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

\dvancement to candidacy signifies that a student has suc- 
cessfully completed a substantial portion of the graduate pro- 
gram and, in consultation with the graduate advisor, has es- 
ablished a curricular plan to follow for the purpose of gradu- 
Jtion. The Candidacy Form must be filed and approved prior 
o the completion of 24 credit hours (or earlier if required by 
he graduate program). The form is approved by the perti- 
lent graduate program personnel (e.g., major professor, 
;raduate advisor, etc.) and the dean of the College of Gradu- 
ite Studies (or designee). 

vl.A.T. and M.S.T. Candidacy Forms must also be signed by 
he dean of the College of Education, or an appropriate rep- 
esentative, if licensure is being sought. The Candidacy Form 
or the M.Ed, requires that the student have a professional 
icense to teach and thus must also be signed by the dean of 
he College of Education or an appropriate representative. 

■or students pursuing either a second master's or specialist's 
iegree at MTSU, the Candidacy Form should be filed prior to 
he completion of 1 8 credit hours of course work. 

Zandidacy Change 

f for any reason the courses listed on the Candidacy Form 
annot be followed, a Change of Candidacy Form must be 
iled with the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. This 



Faculty Advisors 

After admission, a degree student is assigned faculty advisors 
in the major and minor areas. The student should consult 
these advisors for program planning and optimal course sched- 
uling. 

Intent to Graduate 

By the end of the first full week of the term in which the 
student intends to graduate, or by the end of the first week of 
Summer Session II (for August graduation), the candidate must 
file an Intent to Graduate Form with the College of Graduate 
Studies, pay graduation fees at the Business Office, and com- 
plete the College of Graduate Studies exit survey 

Thesis 

The thesis in final form must be submitted to the dean of the 
College of Graduate Studies no later than 30 days before 
graduation. It must be approved by the major professor, the 
reader(s), and the department chair. Guidelines for the thesis 
vary from department to department. The primary responsi- 
bility for form, content, and style rests with the student and 
major professor. Nonetheless, a thesis not meeting standards 
may be rejected by the dean of the College of Graduate Stud- 
ies and graduation delayed. The original and three copies of 
the thesis must be submitted for binding. One copy is for- 
warded to the library, one to the major professor, one to the 
department, and one is returned to the student. Additional 
fees must be paid if extra copies are bound. 
NOTE: Once the student hcis begun taking thesis research, he/she is 
expected to enroll in at least 7 semester hour of thesis research (course 
664) until the thesis is completed. 



42 



Specialist in 
Education Degree 



Middle Tennessee State University offers the Specialist 
in Education (Ed.S.) degree in Administration and 
Supervision and in Curriculum and Instruction. The Ed.S. 
is provided specifically for teachers, counselors, and 
administrators wishing to pursue graduate study beyond 
the master's level. The Ed.S. in Administration and 
Supervision is available through the Department of Edu- 
cational Leadership. The Ed.S. in Curriculum and In- 
struction is offered by both the Department of Educa- 
tional Leadership and the Department of Elementary 
and Special Education. The Ed.S. in Curriculum and In- 
struction with a concentration in School Psychology is 
offered by the Department of Psychology. 

Common Requirements for All 
Specialist's Degree Programs 

All specialist's candidates must 

1 . complete all applicable coursework after receipt of the 
master's degree. 

2. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours. No courses at the 
500 level or lower may apply toward the specialist's de- 
gree. 

3. successfully complete a written (and/or oral) com- 
prehensive examination. The examination may be taken 
no more than twice. 

4. complete all specific graduate program requirements. 
These additional specific degree requirements are found 
under the applicable department. 

Second Specialist's Degree from MTSU 

An individual who has received one specialist's degree from 
MTSU may obtain a second specialist's degree with a mini- 
mum of 24 additional semester hours of graduate coursework 
earned at MTSU if approved in advance by the graduate pro- 
gram and the graduate dean. No transfer coursework is ac- 
cepted towards the second specialist's degree. All specific 
course requirements must be met for the second degree (ex- 
cept FOED 706, Seminar in Educational Foundations, and 
FOED 713, The Curriculum: Structures and Functions), in- 
cluding the written comprehensive examinations and thesis 
(if relevant). All semester hours must be earned after the first 
specialist's degree has been conferred. 



The Master's 
Program 



Middle Tennessee State University offers nine different 
master's degrees and approximately fifty master's pro- 
grams. These include the Master of Arts (M.A.), the 
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.), the Master of Busi- 
ness Administration (M.B.A.), the Master of Business 
Education (M.B.E.), the Master of Criminal Justice 
(M.C.J. ), the Master of Education (M.Ed.), the Master of 
Science (M.S.), the Master of Science in Teaching 
(M.S.T.), and the Master of Vocational-Technical Edu- 
cation (M.V.TE.). 

Common Requirements for all 
Master's Degree Programs 

All master's candidates must 

1 . satisfactorily complete the undergraduate prerequisites. 

2. complete a minimum of 30 (or more) semester hours of 
graduate coursework. No more than 30 percent of the 
total degree hours may be dually listed as undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours. No undergraduate courses may ap- 
ply toward the graduate program requirements. If a the- 
sis is required, normally no more than three hours will 
apply toward the 30 (or more) semester hour program 
requirement. However, additional semester hours of the- 
sis research (664) may be taken and will appear on the 
student's transcript. 

3. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours. 

4. successfully complete a written (and/or oral) comprehen- 
sive examination; the examination may be taken no more 
than twice. 

5. complete all specific graduate program requirements 

Programs Leading to the M.A. Degree 

There are six departments offering programs leading to th€| 
Master of Arts degree. They are Economics and Finance, En- 
glish, History, Music, Psychology, and Sociology and Anthror 
pology. 

Normally the Master of Arts degree requires a thesis; how-i 
ever, graduate programs in English, Economics and Finance^ 
and Music include a non-thesis option requiring more thar\ 
30 semester hours. (Specific program requirements may b€| 
found under the appropriate department.) 

Program Leading to the M.A.T. Degree 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree is offered in Foreigr^ 
Languages. The degree should be pursued by those individu-, 
als interested in teaching. Admission is open to licensed teach-i 
ers as well as those seeking initial licensure. Specific degree 
requirements are found under the Department of Foreigr 
Languages and Literatures. 



43 



Program Leading to the M.B.A. Degree 

rhe Master of Business Administration program includes 
:ourses in the following six areas of business: accounting, 
economics, finance, management, marketing, and informa- 
;ion systems. Specific degree requirements are found under 
Business Administration. 

Program Leading to the M.B.E. Degree 

\ Master of Business Education (M.B.E.) degree program is 
offered by the Department of Business Education, Marketing 
Education, and Office Management (BMOM) in the College 
jf Business. Specific degree requirements are found under 
;he Department of BMOM. 

Program Leading to the M.C.J. Degree 

rhe Master of Criminal Justice degree program is a joint pro- 
yam with Tennessee State University. Students may seek pro- 
essional employment in the operational agencies in the field 
jf criminal justice or pursue relevant research or teaching 
jositions. Eighteen semester hours credit from each univer- 
;ity is required. Applicants must complete a special applica- 
ion specifically for this degree program. Specific degree re- 
:|uirements are found under the Department of Criminal Jus- 
ice Administration. 

Programs Leading to the M.Ed. Degree 

rhere are four departments offering programs leading to the 
blaster of Education degree. The M.Ed, degree provides pro- 
;rams of study in Administration and Supervision, Aerospace 
Education, Curriculum and Instruction, School Counseling, 
heading, and Special Education. Specific degree requirements 
ire found under the Department of Aerospace, Department 
jf Educational Leadership, Department of Elementary and 
Special Education, and Department of Psychology. 

Programs Leading to the M.S. Degree 

rhere are eleven departments and/or colleges offering pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Science degree. The Univer- 
lity offers the Master of Science degree in Accounting/lnfor- 
nation Systems; Aviation Administration; Biology; Chemis- 
ry; Computer Science; Exercise Science and Health Promo- 
ion; Health, Physical Education, Recreation; Human Sci- 
ences; Industrial Studies; Mass Communication; and Math- 
ematics. Specific degree requirements are found under the 
ipplicable department. 

viormally, the Master of Science degree requires a thesis; 
lowever, graduate programs in Computer Science, Exercise 
Science and Health Promotion; Health, Physical Education, 
Recreation; Industrial Studies; Mass Communication; and 
vlathematics include a non-thesis option requiring more than 
10 semester hours. (Specific program requirements may be 
ound under the appropriate department.) 

'rograms Leading to the M.S.T. Degree 

rhe Master of Science in Teaching degree is offered by the 
Department of Biology and Department of Mathematical Sci- 
ences. The degree should be pursued by those individuals 
nterested in teaching. Admission is open to licensed teach- 
ers as well as those seeking initial licensure. Specific degree 
equirements are found under the applicable department. 



Programs Leading to the M.V.T.E. Degree 

Schools and departments participating in this degree are 
Agribusiness and Agriscience; Business Education, Marketing 
Education, and Office Management; Human Sciences; and 
Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies. The curricu- 
lum offers preparation for students to develop, administer, 
and supervise vocational-technical programs in area voca- 
tional schools, public schools, and community colleges. Spe- 
cific degree requirements are found under the section on 
Vocational-Technical Education. 

Second Master's Degree from MTSU 

An individual who has received one master's degree from 
MTSU may obtain a second master's degree with a mini- 
mum of 24 semester hours of coursework earned at MTSU if 
approved in advance by the graduate program and the gradu- 
ate dean. No transfer coursework is accepted towards the 
second master's degree. All specific course requirements must 
be met for the second degree, including the written compre- 
hensive examinations and thesis (if relevant). All semester 
hours must be earned after the first master's degree has been 
conferred. 




44 



Academic Abbreviations 



AAS 


African-American Studies 


ACA 


Academic Success Program 


ACSI 


Actuarial Sciences 


ACTC 


Accounting 


ADV 


Advertising 


AERO 


Aerospace 


ABAS 


Agribusiness and Agriscience 


ANTH 


Anthropology 


ART 


Art 


AS 


Aging Studies 


ASTR 


Astronomy 


ATHC 


Athletic Coaching 


ATHT 


Athletic Training 


BAD 


Business Administration 


BIOL 


Biology 


BLAW 


Business Law 


BMOM 


Business Education, Marketing Education, 




and Office Management 


CDFS 


Child Development and Family Studies 


CHEM 


Chemistry 


CJA 


Criminal Justice Administration 


CM 


Construction Management 


COED 


Cooperative Education 


CSCI 


Computer Science 


DANC 


Dance 


DSE 


Developmental Studies English 


DSM 


Developmental Studies Math 


DSR 


Developmental Studies Reading 


DSS 


Developmental Studies Study Skills 


ECON 


Economics 


ELED 


Elementary Education 


ENGL 


English 


EST 


Environmental Science and Technology 


ET 


Engineering Technology 


ETIS 


Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 


FCSE 


Family and Consumer Sciences Education 


FIN 


Finance 


FL 


Foreign Languages 


FOED 


Foundations of Education 


FREN 


French 


CEOG 


Geography 


GEOL 


Geology 


GERM 


German 


GRAF 


Graphic Communications 


GS 


Global Studies 


HSC 


Human Sciences 


HIST 


History 


HLTH 


Health 


HUM 


Humanities 


IDES 


Interior Design 


lED 


Industrial Education 


INFS 


Computer Information Systems 


ITAL 


Italian 



JAPA 


Japanese 


JOUR 


Journalism 


LATN 


Latin 


LS 


Library Service 


MATH 


Mathematics 


MC 


Mass Communication 


MGMT 


Management 


MKT 


Marketing 


MS 


Military Science 


MUAP 


Applied Music 


MUED 


Music Education 


MUEN 


Music Ensembles 


MUHL 


Music History and Literature 


MUPD 


Music Pedagogy 


MUSI 


Music 


MUTH 


Music Theory 


NFS 


Nutrition and Food Science 


NURS 


Nursing 


PHED 


Physical Education 


PHIL 


Philosophy 


PHOT 


Photography 


PHYS 


Physics 


PLEG 


Paralegal Studies 


PR 


Public Relations 


PS 


Political Science 


PSY 


Psychology 


QM 


Quantitative Methods 


RATV 


Radio-Television 


READ 


Reading 


REC 


Recreation 


RIM 


Recording Industry 


RS 


Religious Studies 


RSE 


Basic Studies English 


RSM 


Basic Studies Math 


RSR 


Basic Studies Reading 


RUSS 


Russian 


SAFE 


Safety 


SCI 


Science 


SPED 


Special Education 


SOC 


Sociology 


SPAN 


Spanish 


SPEE 


Speech, Theatre, and Communication 


SPSE 


School Personnel Service Education 


STAT 


Statistics 


SW 


Social Work 


TRNS 


Transportation 


TXMD 


Textiles, Merchandising, and Design 


UH 


University Honors 


UNIV 


University 101 


VTE 


Vocational-Technical Education 


WMS 


Women's Studies 


YOED 


Youth Education 



Departhents 

and degree programs 



Otudents of the Graduate College are expected to demon- 
strate superior talent, high motivation, and dedication to ad- 
vancing the goals of the University. These goals include an 
emphasis on academic excellence, teaching distinction, pub- 
lic service, research, expanding economic opportunity, cul- 
tural preservation, and quality of life. To achieve those ends 
the University seeks outstanding, highly motivated students. 

The following section describes the academic departments and/ 
or divisions which offer majors and minors for graduate de- 
grees. Included are specific degree program requirements and 
information and course descriptions. 






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46 



Department of 
Accounting 



Ken Harmon, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building N425C 

The mission of the Department of Accounting Is to pro- 
vide a broad-based accounting education that prepares 
students for lifelong learning and professional growth 
throughout their careers. Fulfilling this mission requires 
that our faculty maintain continuous intellectual growth, 
keep abreast of current developments in accounting 
education, and provide service to the profession. 

The Department of Accounting offers the Master of Sci- 
ence in Accounting and Information Systems with ac- 
counting as the primary field and courses for the Mas- 
ter of Business Administration degree. A minor in Ac- 
counting is offered for students seeking a master's de- 
gree other than the M.B.A. The director of graduate 
business studies serves as advisor for the M.S. in Ac- 
counting and Information Systems. 

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the op- 
portunity to take a balance of accounting and infor- 
mation systems courses; however, there is significant 
flexibility in the requirements to allow a student's pro- 
gram to be specialized to the extent desired for particular 
career goals. 

The prerequisites for a student seeking an M.S. degree 
in the department are the same as those required for 
the M.B.A. degree (see page 56), plus instruction in 
international business. A recent graduate of an AACSB- 
accredited program would normally possess an ade- 
quate background in these prerequisites. A student 
electing accounting as a primary field must complete 
an additional 27 hours of prerequisites including 
Intermediate, ACTG 311 and 312; Cost, ACTG 331; 
Advanced, ACTG 41 1 ; Accounting Systems, ACTG 451 
(551); Federal Tax Accounting, ACTG 453 (553); Au- 
diting, ACTG 462; INFS 220; and Business Policy, 
B AD 498. 

To be admitted to the M.S. program (see page 24), a 
student must meet one of the following: 

a. CPA X 200 + CMAT = 950 

or Upper Division GPA x 200 + CMAT = 1,000 

b. International students must comply with the following provision: 
For undergraduate degrees from foreign institutions where a grade 
point average cannot be clearly established but where that work 
is thought to be equivalent to domestic grades of B or higher, 
admission eligibility may be determined by the CMAT score. A 
score of at least 450 is required for unconditional admission un- 
der such circumstances. Preparatory work taken in institutions with 
grading systems paralleling that of most United States institutions 
must conform to a B average. 



The M.S. with Accounting concentration will fulfill the 
new CPA requirements. 

Requirements for the 
Master of Science Degree 

Accounting as Primary Field; 
Information Systems as Secondary Field 



Required 

ACTG 665 
ACTG 651 
ACTG 631 



ACTG 

INFS 



672 
671 



Advanced Accounting Theory 

Federal Income Tax Research and Planning 

Advanced Cost Accounting, Budgeting, and 

Controllership 

Advanced Auditing and Public Accounting Practices 

Systems Analysis 



Electives 

Three hours from INFS 672, 679, or QM 677 

Three hours in ACTG or INFS at the 500 or 600 level 

Three hours in ACTG at the 600 level 

Three hours in international/global course at the 600 level 

Three hours of approved electives at the 600 level 

Additional Requirements 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination 
upon the completion of course requirements. 

The degree is to be completed within six years from the time 
of admission to the degree program. 

No foreign language or thesis is required in the program. 

NOTE: Students who have credit for the undergraduate equivalent of 
the 500-level course are not permitted to enroll in the 500-level course 
for credit. 



Courses in Accounting [ACTG] 

512 Advanced Accounting II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTG 312 
with minimum grade of C. Current topics of interest omitted 
from ACTG 41 1 : SEC practice, special industries (recording and 
music, banking, insurance, behavioral accounting). 

551 Accounting Systems. Three credits. Prerequisites: ACTG 302 
or 331 and INFS 220 or consent of department chair. Current 
developments in establishment of complete accounting systems 
and the application of principles to typical business organiza- 
tions. Special emphasis on cost controls and use of EDR 

553 Federal Taxes I. Three credits. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
and permission of department chair. Addresses determination 
of taxable income for individuals; Federal income tax returns 
and research methods. 

554 Federal Taxes II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTG 453 (553) 
with minimum grade of C or consent of instructor. Structure of 
taxation for corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, gifts; re- 
turns and research. 

557 International Accounting. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTG 21 2 
or equivalent with C or better. Development of accounting sys- 
tems and entrepreneurial practices in various countries, specific 
international financial reporting issues, international financial 
statement analysis, managerial accounting issues for global busi 



;iaM 
isiJi 



Accounting 47 



nesses including budgeting and control, and international taxa- 
tion issues. 

561 Municipal/Governmental Accounting. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: ACTC 312 with minimum grade of C or consent of in- 
structor. Federal, state, and local government accounting prin- 
ciples and procedures; classification of accounts, budgeting, 
general fund revenues, and expenditures. 

563 Auditing II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTC 462 or its equiva- 
lent with a minimum grade of C. Audit procedures used in tests 
of controls and in substantive tests for the major transaction cycles 
by using both microcomputer and statistical sampling. Course 
fulfills the Tennessee CPA requirements for a second course in 
auditing. 

565 Accounting Theory. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTC 312 with 
minimum grade of C (or taken concurrently). Analysis of propo- 
sitions, axioms, theorems, controversial accounting concepts, 
authoritative statements, and research on accounting principles. 

567 CPA Problems. Three credits. Prerequisites: ACTC 411, 453, 
and consent of instructor. Semiannual CPA examination prob- 
lems of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants 
are analyzed. 

600 Survey of Accounting Principles. Three credits. The account- 
ing cycle, financial statements, accounting systems, use of ac- 
counting information for managerial decision-making purposes 
and problem solving. Not open to students with undergraduate 
accounting backgrounds. May not be used for elective credit 
In graduate business degree programs. 

631 Advanced Cost Accounting, Budgeting, and Controllershlp. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: ACTC 302 or 331 or 691. Recent 
conceptual and analytic development in cost accounting, bud- 
geting, and controllershlp. Includes principles and procedures 
in preparation of business budgets and methods of accounting 
for managerial control of cost of production, distribution, and 
administration through the use of standards. 

651 Federal Income Tax Research and Planning. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: ACTC 453/553 and 454/554 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Skillful application of tax research methodology in the use 
of primary tax authority, secondary tax reference materials, and 
research aids. Research through practice in the use of materials 
available in the tax library. 

655 U.S. International Taxation. Three credits. Prerequisites: ACTC 
453/553 and 454/554. Basic concepts of U.S. taxation of inter- 
national transactions. Topics include sourcing of income from 
foreign activities. Subpart F income, selecting the proper ve- 
hicle for foreign investments, and computing foreign tax credits. 

565 Advanced Accounting Theory. Three credits. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of department chair. History and development of accoun- 
tancy, tax structures, and industrial development of past, present, 
and projected societies including relevant research into current 
controversial issues. Extensive research required. Required for 
M.S. in Accounting/Information Systems with accounting as the 
primary field. 

566 Advanced Financial Accounting and Reporting Problems. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: Accounting major or consent of in- 
1 structor. Application of theoretical concepts and promulgations 

of authoritative bodies to financial accounting and financial re- 
porting situations encountered in practice. 

>72 Advanced Auditing and Public Accounting Practices. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: ACTC 462 or consent of department chair. 



Critical analysis of techniques used in auditing, method of data 
collection, and nature of audit evidence. Includes modern and 
relevant statistical and social research techniques and computer 
use as applied to the various steps in audit practices and proce- 
dures. 

681 Empirical Methods in Accounting. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
Foundation requirements and consent of instructor. Independ- 
ent study and research on topics in or related to accounting 
under supervision of graduate faculty. 

691 Accounting and Business Decisions. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: ACTC 212 or equivalent. Accounting concepts and their 
application to the decision-making process. Research reports 
on a variety of financial and managerial accounting topics pre- 
pared and presented orally by the student. Not open to stu- 
dents with undergraduate major in accounting. 

Course in Business Law [BLAW] 

643 Legal Environment of Management. Three credits. Legal rights 
and potential liabilities of business managers. Presentation of 
the legal, ethical, and political environment of business. Includes 
basic principles of the legal system, torts and product liability, 
antitrust, labor and employment laws, securities, contracts, sales, 
secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships, corpo- 
rations, and commercial paper. May not be used for elective 
credit In graduate business degree programs. 




48 



Department of 
Aerospace 



Ronald J. Ferrara, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building S211C 

The Department of Aerospace offers the Master of Sci- 
ence (M.S.) in Aviation Administration, with a concen- 
tration in Airline/Airport Management or Aviation Asset 
Management, and a Master of Education (M.Ed.) in 
Aerospace Education. 

Requirements for the Master of Science — 
Aviation Administration Major 

Normally the required minimum test score for admission to 
this program is 800 on the Graduate Record Examination or 
38 on the Miller Analogies Test. 

Candidate must 

1 . have graduated from an accredited four-year college or 
university to be considered for unconditional admission. 
Transcripts must reflect 6 hours of research tool-related 
course work (e.g., statistics, computer science, etc.) and 
18 semester hours of one of the following disciplines: 
accounting, aviation, business, or information systems. 
Demonstrated knowledge equivalent to that obtainable 
through the undergraduate core curriculum in Aerospace 
may be substituted for up to 15 of the 18 required se- 
mester hours. The aviation course work must include 6 
semester hours in at least two of the following areas: air- 
line or airport management, aviation asset management, 
fixed-base operations or theory of flight. Applicants with 
undergraduate majors in fields other than aviation who 
have not completed a college-level flight theory course, 
or who do not possess Federal Aviation Administration 
or military-issued pilot credentials, will be required to 
enroll in AERO 102 (Theory of Flight) during their first 
semester after admission to the M.S. degree program. 

2. complete 36 semester hours consisting of a 15-hourcore, 
12 hours in the chosen concentration, 6 hours of elec- 
tives, and a 3-hour thesis with a cumulative CPA of 3.0 
or greater. If necessary, an additional 3 hours may be 
taken to complete the thesis; however, these hours may 
not be applied toward elective requirements; 

3. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

4. successfully complete a written comprehensive exami- 
nation (may be taken no more than twice); 

5. successfully complete a thesis defense. 

NOTE: Applicants meeting the above criteria whose cumulative CPA is less 
than 3.0, but at least 2.75 and who present other qualities deemed valu- 
able by the aviation industry, as determined by the Graduate Program Com- 
mittee, may be conditionally accepted in an academic probationary status. 
Students in a probationary status who fail to achieve and maintain a 3.0 
CPA v/ill be suspended from the M.S. degree program. 



Airport/Airline Management Concentration 



Required Courses 


AERO 


612 


Aviation History 


AERO 


615 


Aviation Industries 


STAT 


616 


Statistics OR 


QM 


600 


Quantitative Methods Survey 


AERO 


630 


Air Transportation Systems 


AERO 


661 


Introduction to Aerospace Research 


AERO 


664 


Thesis Research 


Electives - 12 hours from the following: 


AERO 


613 


Safety Administration and Security 


AERO 


617 


Scheduled Air Carrier Operations 


AERO 


619 


Airport Organizational Structures and 
Operational Activities 


AERO 


622 


Environmental Policy 


AERO 


625 


Aviation Policy and Planning 


AERO 


627 


Airport Design 


AERO 


633 


International Aviation Systems 


AERO 


635 


General Aviation 


AERO 


637 


Aviation Contracts and Leases 


AERO 


645 


Airport Funding Policy 


INFS 


661 


Information Systems Management and Application OR 


INFS 520 


Microcomputer Database Applications 



Guided Electives 

Students will select 6 hours of approved electives suited to their career 
goals from another department within the university. Selection will be 
made with appropriate guidance from faculty of both departments. 

Aviation Asset Management Concentration 

Required Courses 

AERO 61 2 Aviation History 

AERO 615 Aviation Industries 

STAT 616 Statistics OR 

QM 600 Quantitative Methods Survey 

AERO 630 Air Transportation Systems 

AERO 661 Introduction to Aerospace Research 

AERO 664 Thesis Research 

Electives - 12 hours from the following: 

AERO 61 7 Scheduled Air Carrier Operations 

AERO 625 Aviation Policy and Planning 

AERO 635 General Aviation 

AERO 637 Aviation Contracts and Leases 

AERO 645 Airport Funding Policy 

INFS 661 Information Systems Management and Application OR 1 

INFS 520 Microcomputer Database Applications 

ACTC 600 Survey of Accounting Principles 

ECON 603 Survey of Economic Theory g 

Guided Electives 

Students will select 6 hours of approved electives suited to their career 
goals from another department within the university. Selection will be 
made with appropriate guidance from faculty of both departments. 



Requirements for the Master of Education — \ 
Aerospace Education Major 

Advisement for the degree is provided by graduate facull 
members in the Aerospace Department and one gradual 
faculty member from the College of Education. Students 
the M.Ed, degree program may elect either an aerospace or 
an education option. Both options consist of a 1 3-hour core 
and are designed to serve applicants interested in education 
or professional development programs and administration. 



i 

nr* 



Aerospace 49 



Normally, the required test score for admission to the M.Ed, 
program is 30 on the Miller Analogies Test or a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination. 

Candidate must 

1 . hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution; 

2. complete 34 semester hours with no more than 30 per- 
cent of the total degree hours dually listed as undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours (Students should refer to the appro- 
priate option for specific requirements.); 

3. be admitted by Aerospace Department's Graduate Pro- 
gram Committee; 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exami- 
nation (may be taken no more than twice). 

Dption 1 (Aerospace) 

Required - 13 hours 

\ERO 610 Aviation Workshop (same as YOED 610) 
jPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 
\ERO 661 Introduction to Aerospace Research OR 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 
XERO 61 2 Aviation History 

Verospace Electives - 1 2 hours 

\ny 500-level aerospace course not previously taken at the 400-level 
)r any 600-level aerospace course with the approval of the student's 
\erospace Department's advisor. 

iducation Electives - the following three (3) courses or courses ap- 
Koved by the College of Education advisor 

"OED 602 Educational Foundations 
JPSE 604 Supervision of Instruction 
iPSE 605 Instructional Leadership 

Dption 2 (Education) 

students choosing this option must have a designated Col- 
ege of Education advisor and should have the appropriate 
caching license. The licensure requirement may be waived 
jnder special circumstances. A student seeking a licensure 
vaiver must initiate a written request with the advisor, seek 
ipproval from the chair and dean of the College of Educa- 
ion, and forward the request to the Office of Teaching Li- 
rensure, McWherter Learning Resources Center 1 70. 



(equired - 13 hours 



Aviation Workshop 

Introduction to Curriculum Development 

Analysis and Application of Educational Research OR 

Introduction to Aerospace Research 

Aviation History 



Educational Foundations 

Supervision of Instruction 

Instructional Leadership 

Studies in Leadership 

Seminar in Curriculum Improvement 

School Finance 

Studies in Education: Administration 

Microcomputers in Educational Administration 

^rospace Electives - 9 hours 

^ny 500-level aerospace course not previously taken at the 400-level 
it any 600-level aerospace course except for AERO 610 and 661 . 



'OED 


610 


IPSE 


643 


OED 


661 


AERO 


661 


VERO 


612 


ilectlves 


1-12 


OED 


602 


.PSE 


604 


iPSE 


605 


IPSE 


608 


iPSE 


625 


;PSE 


634 


IPSE 


650 


IPSE 


660 



Courses in Aerospace [AERO] 

501 Aerospace Vehicle Systems. Three credits. Design, use, and 
function of typical hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems 
used on aircraft. For potential pilots, flight engineers, and me- 
chanics. 

503 Air Traffic Control. Three credits. The FAA Air Traffic Control 
system used to regulate air vehicle traffic during enroute and 
terminal phases of flight, with emphasis on communication, navi- 
gation, and control equipment and procedures. 

505 Aerospace Internship I. Three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of 
department chair. Student employed by an acceptable airline, 
airport director, or aerospace industry for field work. Minimum 
300 hours work required. Pass/Fail grading. 

507 Problems in Aerospace. One to three credits. Individual di- 
rected study in the field of aerospace. 

508 Flight Instruction IV. Three credits. Academics for the ATP and 

dispatchers written. If flight is desired, student will meet FAR 61 
and fee required. 

509 Aerospace Science for Teachers. Three credits. For teachers 
who desire an introduction to the total aviation and space ef- 
fort. 

510 Flight Instruction for Teachers. Three credits. Flight instruction 
and discussion provide an opportunity to understand the air- 
plane and its operation. Fee required. 

511 Airport Management. Three credits. Airport operations. Devel- 
opment of an airport master plan. 

513 Aerospace Physiology. Three credits. Instruction, readings, and 
structured experiences to ensure familiarity with the various 
physiological and health-related factors affecting a flyer's safety 
and performance. 

515 Fixed Base Operations Management. Three credits. The FBO 
operator and the essential role played in general aviation. 

522 Aircraft Systems Management. Three credits. Instruction and 
the requirements pertaining to activities of a flight engineer. 

523 Airline Management. Three credits. Airline operation and imple- 
mentation of sound management practices. 

533 Advanced Air Navigation. Three credits. Advanced navigation 
equipment and operation procedures, GPS, and LORAN. 

537 Airport Planning and Design. Three credits. Methods utilized 
in airport planning and design; relationship of the airport and 
the community. 

550 Space. Three credits. Extensive study of the history of space 
exploration, the successes and failures of manned and unmanned 
efforts, and what the future may be for human beings in space. 

565 Aviation Law. Three credits. Legal responsibility in the aviation 
industry. 

610 Aviation Workshop. Four credits. (Same as YOED 610.) A first 
course in aerospace education; provides an overview of aero- 
space historically and in the future. 

612 Aviation History. Three credits. Detailed examination of the 
development and role of aviation and its economic, social, and 
political impact on the modern world. Particular emphasis on 



50 Aerospace 



the global aspects of civilian aviation and the consequences of 
the transportation revolution it engendered. Specific topics ana- 
lyzed in detail each semester. 

61 3 Safety Administration and Security. Three credits. An examina- 
tion of the various programs which airport operators employ in 
operating and maintaining airport safety and security services. 
Special emphasis on federal guidelines and their applications at 
commercial service airports. 

615 Aviation Industries. Three credits. An overview of domestic and 
international air transportation businesses. Includes an analysis 
of extant and forecast labor requirements. 

61 7 Scheduled Air Carrier Operations. Three credits. An examina- 
tion of contemporary problems and issues confronting airline 
industry policy makers, government regulators, managers, and 
the traveling public. 

61 9 Airport Organizational Structures and Operational Activities. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: AERO 51 1 or 537 or consent of in- 
structor. A critical analysis of airport organizational structures, 
functions, and constraints affecting the airport. A detailed view 
of operational activities and methods to improve airpwrt efficiency. 

622 Environmental Policy. Three credits. Airport planning and land 
use programs and procedures as they are currently used within 
the industry. 

625 Aviation Policy and Planning. Three credits. The regulatory 
agencies of the aviation industry and their functions. Special 
emphasis on current problems and issues affecting the industry. 

627 Airport Design. Three credits. Introduces the concepts of air- 
port planning, design, and layout with particular emphasis on 
community characteristics and resource allocation. Students will 
become familiar with the Federal Aviation Administration's role 
in the airport design process. 

630 Air Transportation Systems. Three credits. Explores the evolu- 
tion of the National Airspace and Airway System from its cha- 
otic start to a reasonably sophisticated system. Covers impor- 
tance of technological developments to improve the system. 

633 International Aviation Systems. Three credits. An in-depth 
analysis of international aviation with particular attention to U.S. 
aviation interface. Areas covered include the air traffic control 
systems, bilateral agreements, nationalized vs. privately owned 
carriers, ETOPS restrirtions, marketing and operational difficul- 
ties, etc. 



635 General Aviation. Three credits. Operations, supervision, and| 
the role of administration. 

637 Aviation Contracts and Leases. Three credits. An examination! 
of the various agreements utilized by airports to define the terms? 
and conditions for airlines, FBOs, concessionaires, air cargo> 
operators, and other airport tenants. Analysis of the general pro- 
visions and requirements contained within airport leases and 
those specific to each tenant. A review of airport lease adminls-- 
tratlon and compliance procedures. 

638 Aerostructures. Three credits. Prerequisites: MATH 121 or 142 
and PHYS 231. Concepts of mechanics applied to analysis ofi 
structural elements used in aerospace vehicles. Loading, deflec- 
tion safety factors, and modes of possible failure. 

639 Advanced Aerodynamics. Three credits. Prerequisite: AERO 314 
or equivalent. Examines the aerodynamics of aircraft flight from' 
subsonic to hypersonic speeds, with flight through the four sonic 
regions discussed and solutions to problems presented. 

640 Aerospace Seminar. One credit. Prerequisite: Last semester of: 
resident enrollment. A capstone course involving the analysis, 
synthesis, and integration of relevant academic experiences. 

645 Airport Funding Policy. Three credits. Airport subsidy funding 
by the local, state, and federal governments and their essential 
components as applied to local airports. Procedures necessary 
to obtain government funding and grants available for building 
new facilities and repairing existing buildings. 

661 Introduction to Aerospace Research. Three credits. Emphasis 
on research as a significant component of graduate study to in- 
clude methods, procedures, style, and form. 

654 Problems In Aerospace Education. One, two, or three credits. 
(Same as YOED 654.) Content varies with needs of individual 
students who are interested in making a specialized study of 
current problems in the field of aerospace education. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Prerequisite: AERO 661. 
Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, 
collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. Once 
enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of 
master's research each semester until completion. S/LI grading. 

670 Advanced Aviation Workshop. Four credits. (Same as YOED 
670.) Builds on prior experiences in aviation/aerospace. Essen- 
tial for the prospective teacher or aerospace education courses 
at any level. 




51 



School of 
Agribusiness and 
Agriscience 



Harley W. Foutch, Director 

Jtark Agribusiness and Agriscience Center 100 

rhe School of Agribusiness and Agriscience cooperates 
vith the Departments of Business Education, Market- 
ng Education and Office Management; Human Sci- 
ences; and Engineering Technology and Industrial Stud- 
es to offer the Master of Vocational-Technical Educa- 
ion (M.V.T.E.) degree. The school also offers a minor at 
he graduate level. 

Courses in Agribusiness and Agriscience 
ABAS] 

Microcomputer Applications in Agriculture. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: CSCI 115 or INFS 220. Includes use of agricultural 
software, agricultural communications network, computer daily 
feeding machines, and farm records. 



10 



1 3 Agricultural Marketing and Price Analysis. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: ABAS 31 3 or approval of instructor. Agricultural prices 
and their relationship to production and marketing. Agricultural 
marketing systems, functions, institutions, and structural changes. 

14 Economicsof Agribusiness Management. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: ABAS 313 or approval of instructor. The application of 
economic concepts to agribusiness firms. 

15 Agricultural Policy. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 313 or 
approval of instructor. Agricultural policy in a democratic soci- 
ety; relationship of farm groups to public policy; types of agri- 
cultural programs and appraisal of their results. 

20 Fruit and Vegetable Marketing. Three credits. Prerequisites: SCI 
100 and BIOL 100 or approval of instructor. Basic biochemistry 
of respiration, handling techniques and practices, quality as- 
sessment and marketing of fruit and vegetable crops. Both do- 
mestic and international marketing of fruit and vegetable prod- 
ucts discussed. Examines economic impact of improper hand- 
ling on both the local producer and the end user. 

21 Farm Power and Equipment. Three credits. Gasoline engines 
with actual work experience in overhaul. Work also with trans- 
missions, hydraulics, braking systems, and other farm equipment 
including use of shop manuals, operation manuals, and parts 
books. 

22 Methods of Teaching Agricultural Mechanics. Three credits. 
Emphasis on performing shop skills such as welding, brazing, 
electrical wiring, etc. 

23 Adult Education in Vocational-Education and Program Devel- 
opment. Three credits. How to teach adults and administer adult 



programs. Emphasis on planning, organizing, and arranging 
courses for adults in agriculture. 

526 Behavior of Domestic Animals. Three credits. Behavior aspects 
of raising and managing domestic animals to include equine, 
swine, goats, cattle, sheep, dogs, and cats. Communicative, in- 
gestive, sexual, social, aggressive, and abnormal behaviors em- 
phasized. 

531 Forage Crops. Three credits. Adaptation, distribution, estab- 
lishment, management, cultivation, and utilization of forage le- 
gumes and grasses. 

533 Turf Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 161 or 
BIOL 112. Establishment and management of turf grasses for 
lawns, golf courses, and parks. 

534 Soil Formation. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 334. Envi- 
ronmental factors affecting soil formation and utilization. 

535 Soil Survey and Land Use. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 
334 or approval of instructor. Soil properties used to determine 
suitability for land use. Lecture/lab. 

540 Horsemanship — Equitation. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 
240 or approval of instructor. Proper horseback riding, handling, 
mounting, and dismounting. Various gaits and proper equita- 
tion stressed. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory peri- 
ods. 

541 Animal Nutrition and Feeding. Three credits. Gastrointestinal 
tract, process of digestion, and nutrient utilization. Application 
of principles of animal nutrition to formulation of supplements 
and complete rations for livestock. 

542 Genetics of Domestic Livestock. Three credits. Includes an in- 
troduction to the basic principles of genetics, inbreeding, quan- 
titative traits in livestock, prediction of breeding value and ge- 
netic progress, method of selection, mating systems, methods 
of genetic evaluation, computer software for animal breeding 
and genetics, and genetic engineering. 

543 Light Horse Production. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 240 
or approval of instructor. Breeding, feeding, management, and 
disease control practices essential for economical light horse pro- 
duction. 

546 Care and Training of Horses. Three credits. Prerequisites: ABAS 
240, 340, and 440 or approval of instructor. Theory, fundamen- 
tals, and practices of breaking, training, fitting, showing, and 
the use of light horses for riding and driving, with special em- 
phasis on the Tennessee Walking Horse and the needs of the 
local area. 

547 Advanced Beef Production. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 
347 or approval of instructor. In-depth look at various systems 
of beef production from standpoint of function, economics, and 
suitability to locale. Extensive field trips to commercial cow- 
calf, feedlot, performance testing, stocker, and purebred opera- 
tions. 

551 Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology. Three credits. 
Advanced topics in the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinol- 
ogy of reproduction in domestic livestock species. Topics in- 
clude male and female physiology and an overview of com- 
parative anatomy and physiology between species. Current tech- 
nologies and methods in controlling reproduction in livestock 
species also discussed. 



52 



562 Greenhouse Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 
161 or BIOL 112. Analysis of soils, fertilizers, irrigation tech- 
niques, container preparation, ventilation, growth regulation, 
and carbon dioxide enrichment for greenhouse operation. Two 
hours lecture and two hours lab. 

563 Floriculture. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 1 61 or BIOL 1 1 2. 
Propagation and other cultural practices for the production and 
maintenance of plants and flowers in the home. Two hours lec- 
ture and two hours lab. 

564 Landscaping. Three credits. Application of the principles of 
design, the use of proportionate-sized woody landscape plants, 
and other practices to produce low-maintenance-cost land- 
scapes. One hour lecture and four hours lab. 

565 Plant Breeding. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 1 61 or BIOL 
112. Application of genetics to theory and breeding practices 
for improvement of agronomic and ornamental plants. 

567 Plant Propagation. Three credits. Prerequisite: ABAS 161 or 
BIOL 1 1 2. Anatomical features and physiological principles in- 
volved in propagating plants from seed and by division, cutting, 
budding, and grafting. Use of growth regulators and environ- 
mental factors. Two hours lecture and two hours lab. 

570 Agriculture in Our Lives. Three credits. The national and inter- 
national importance of U.S. agriculture. Emphasis on food pro- 
duction and marketing, land conservation, and agriculture re- 
lated recreation. Accepted as a natural science elective for edu- 
cation majors. NO CREDIT GIVEN TOWARD A MAJOR IN THE 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIBUSINESS AND AGRISCIENCE. 

583 Food Quality Control. Three credits. Prerequisites: SC1 1 00 and 
BIOL 100 or approval of instructor. Quality control and sensory 
evaluation techniques utilized in food processing. Instrumental 
and physical methods of quality determination of raw and pro- 
cessed food products, hazard analysis and critical control point 
(HACCP), and quality philosophies employed in the industry. 
Sensory evaluation techniques and statistical analysis of evalua- 
tion results covered. 

591 Problems in Agriculture. One to six credits. Problem or prob- 
lems selected from one of the major disciplines. May involve 
conferences with instructor, library work, field study and/or labo- 
ratory activity. Students can take from one to three credits with 
a maximum of three per semester. 

598 Seminar in Horse Science. One credit. Familiarizes horse sci- 
ence majors with important current scientific investigation in 
horse science. 

599 Seminar. One credit. Students required to research and make 
an oral report on a current agricultural topic. 

645 A, B, C, D, E Problems in Agriscience Technologies. Three 
credits each. Prerequisite: Teaching experience or approval of 
instructor. Provides agricultural education teachers with inten- 
sive training in advanced technologies. A MAXIMUM OF SIX 
CREDIT HOURS IN EACH DIVISION. 

A. Animal Science 

B. Plant Science 

C. Agricultural Mechanics ^ 

D. Agribusiness 

E. Forestry and Agricultural Products 



Department of Art 



Carlyle Johnson, Chair 
Art Barn 115 

The Department of Art offers a minor at the graduate 
level. 



Courses in Art [ART] 

500 Workshop. One to three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Subject matter as well as credit to be determined by 
the instructor. May be conducted in the area of art, art educa- 
tion, or any art discipline. (A maximum of nine credits may bt 
applied toward a degree.) 



501 



502 



Lapidary. Three credits. Prerequisites: ART 201 and 302 or per- 
mission of instructor. Introduces cutting, polishing, and setting 
of semi-precious minerals with a basic course in stone identifi- 
cation. 

Enameling. Three credits. Prerequisites: ART 201 and 302 ot 
permission of instructor. Introduces basic techniques of enam- 
eling on metal with strong emphasis on development of student's 
aesthetic and design awareness. 

Jewelry. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 302 or permission of 
instructor. Studio practice in constructing, forging, casting, and 
enameling metals in creating forms for jewelry. 

Portfolio M. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor. Production of portfolio-based problems with emphasis on 
advanced design skills related to the specific needs of the work- 
place. Includes basic collateral problems, ad campaigns, corpo- 
rate identity, signage, plus a self-promotional package. 

Senior Project. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor Following a portfolio review, each member of the class will 
devise a project that conceptually and visually addresses his or 
her design/illustration goals. 

Internship. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of internship 
coordinator. Advanced students gain practical experience in a 
professional setting. Approximately 1 50 work hours required 
for the semester. 



551 Sculpture IV. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 353 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Development of concepts and techniques with 
primary emphasis on metal sculpture. Experiences include gas 
and electric welding, fabricating, grinding, finishing, and subor- 
dinate use of other sculpture materials. 

552 Sculpture V. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 551 or permission 
of instructor. Development of concepts and techniques with pri- 
mary emphasis on casting activities in the foundry covering vari- 
ous metal casting techniques and subordinate use of other sculp- 
ture materials. 

553 Sculpture VI. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 552 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Problems in sculpture acceptable to both stu- 
dent and instructor, selected by the student after consultation 
with instructor. 



531 



532 



533 



53 



564 Advanced Art Problems. One to three credits. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. Structure and content determined by 
the Art faculty on the basis of individual need. Student should 
be prepared to do independent research and experimentation 
in the area seleaed. Arrangements must be made prior to regis- 
tration for acceptance to proper assignment of course credit. (A 
maximum of nine credits may be applied toward a degree.) 

568 Individual Problems In Drawing. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
1 2 semester hours of previous drawing credit or permission of 
instructor. Advanced-level course with the content determined 
in advance through consultation with the instructor. 

571 Painting IV. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor. Projects in painting; content of the course planned by stu- 
dent under supervision of instructor. Final paper required. 

572 Painting V. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 571 or permission 
of instructor. Independent studies course in painting which con- 
tinues concerns of Painting IV. 

573 Painting VI. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 572 or permission 
of instructor. Independent studies course in painting which con- 
tinues concerns of Painting IV. Final paper required. 

581 Intermediate Clay II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 382 or 
permission of instructor. Laboratory research and testing of ce- 
ramic materials, formulation of glazes and clay bodies, devel- 
opment of a glaze and a clay body. 

582 Advanced Clay. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 383 or per- 
mission of instructor. Studio experiences in design and construc- 
tion of sculptural clay forms. Forming methods and decorative 
techniques explored. 

583 Advanced Study in Clay. Three credits. Prerequisite: ART 482/ 
582 or permission of instructor. Directed individual study of a 
problem mutually agreed upon by the student and course in- 
structor. Written paper and exhibit required. 

590 Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Art. Three credits. West- 
ern visual art movements and trends ca. 1 750-ca. 1950, focus- 
ing on European painting and sculpture with periodic explora- 

, tions of non-European and non-Western traditions for perspec- 

' live. 

592 Contemporary Art. Three credits. Contemporary Western vi- 
sual art movements and issues ca. 1 945 to present, focusing on 

' American painting and sculpture with periodic explorations of 

other traditions for perspective. 

594 A-Z Studies in Art History. Three credits. Content varies. When 
offered, particular topics addressed are indicated by the course 
title in the class schedule book. Depending on the nature of the 
material to be covered, prerequisites may be imposed by the 
instructor. Can be repeated for up to 9 hours. 

596 Independent Studies in Art History. Three credits. Investiga- 
tions into art history under the direction of a member of the art 
history faculty. Topic{s) of investigation must be agreed upon by 
both student and instructor based on discussions prior to regis- 
tering for this course. Can be repeated for up to 9 hours. 



Department of 
Biology 



George Murphy, Chair 
Davis Science Building 127 

The Department of Biology offers the Master of Sci- 
ence and the Master of Science in Teaching as well as a 
minor at the graduate level. Normally, the required test 
score for admission to both programs is 30 on the Miller 
Analogies Test or a satisfactory Graduate Record Exami- 
nation score. 



Requirements for the Master of Science 

Candidate must 

1 . have an undergraduate minor in biology or its equiv- 
alent at time of admission; 

2. complete a minimum of 30 semester hours including a 
thesis of 3 semester hours with no more than 30 percent 
of the total degree hours dually listed as undergraduate/ 
graduate hours; 

complete 6 semester hours of a foreign language or pass 
a language examination or complete one year of approved 
research tools in addition to the 30 hours; 
pursue a major of at least 16 semester hours which in- 
cludes: 

BIOL 662 Biological Research 

BIOL 663 Biological Literature* 

BIOL 664 Thesis Research 

BIOL 665,666 Seminar 

Remaining courses will include approved courses in bi- 
ology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, or certain other 
related disciplines. A minor is optional but if elected must 
include a minimum of 1 2 semester hours, 
file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 
successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

*5tudents who completed BIOL 323 or equivalent course should con- 
sult with department chair. 



3. 



5. 



6. 



Requirements for the 
Master of Science in Teaching 

The Master of Science in Teaching degree should be pursued 
by those individuals interested in teaching at the secondary 
level. Candidates seeking initial licensure must meet the major 
requirements listed below, satisfy a professional education 
component, and meet discipline-related requirements. The 
candidate should contact the chair of the Department of Edu- 
cational Leadership for the professional education compo- 
nent and the chair of the Department of Biology for the dis- 
cipline-related requirements. 



54 Biology 



The biology component for all students will be selected with 
and approved by the graduate coordinator of the Depart- 
ment of Biology. 

A candidate desiring to major in biology who is a licensed 
teacher must: 

1. have an undergraduate minor in biology or its equiv- 
alent at time of admission; 

2. complete a minimum of 32 semester hours with no more 
than 30 percent of the total degree hours dually listed as 
undergraduate/graduate hours; 

3. complete a major of at least 18 semester hours which 
includes 

BIOL 532 Seminar: Advancements in Biology 

BIOL 633 Principles of Physiology 

BIOL 646 Conservation Biology 

BIOL 650 Special Problems in Biology 

BIOL 663 Biological Literature* 

BIOL 5--/6-- Biology Elective 

Remaining courses will include approved courses in bi- 
ology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, or other related 
disciplines. 

The appropriate education courses are determined 
by the State of Tennessee's most current licensing re- 
quirements. All M.S.T. candidates, whether licensed or 
seeking initial licensing, must contact the chair of the 
Department of Educational Leadership for number of 
hours and education courses necessary to complete the 
degree. 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

'Students who completed BIOL 323 or equivalent should consult with 
department chair. 



Courses in Biology [BIOL] 



501 Embryology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 11 2. Early 
development of the frog, chick, pig, and human. Living mate- 
rial, whole mounts, and serial sections used for the study of cleav- 
age, germ layer formation, histogenesis, and organogenesis. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

502 Cooiparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. Four credits. Pre- 
requisites: BIOL 111 and 1 1 2. Vertebrate morphology and the 
development and function of systems and organs. Three lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory. 

503 Non-Flowering Plants. Four credits. Prerequisites; BIOL 111 
and 112. Structure, physiology, methods of reproduction, and 
classification of the algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, and ferns. 
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

504 General Entomology. Three credits. Prerequisite: 8 hours of 
biology. Structure, classification, evolution, importance, and life 
history of insects. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

505 Parasitology. Three credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 112. 
Life histories, host-parasite relationships, and control measures 
of the more common parasites of humans and domesticated 
animals. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

510 History and Philosophyof Biology. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
8 hours of biology. Development of biology; the philosophy, 
ideas, and contributions of outstanding biologists. Two lectures. 



512 Flowering Plants. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 112. 
Structure and classification of seed plants and a survey of local 
flora. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

513 Histology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 112. Mi- 
croscopic anatomy of vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

514 Invertebrate Zoology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 
112. Structure, functions, life histories, and economic impor- 
tance of the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work comprises de- 
tailed studies of representative specimens. Three lectures and I 
one three-hour laboratory. 

51 7 Endocrinology. Three credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 112 
(or equivalent), and one year of chemistry. Structure, function, 
and integrative mechanisms of vertebrate endocrine organs, with 
additional attention to invertebrate hormones. Three lectures. 

518 Vertebrate Zoology. Four credits. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biol- 
ogy. Structure, life history, and classification offish, amphibians, 
reptiles, birds, and mammals. Local representatives are empha- • 
sized. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

522 Ichthyology. Four credits. Prerequisite: 14 hours of biology or ' 
consent of instructor The morphology physiology, taxonomy, and I 
ecology of fishes. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

524 General Ecology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 1 1 1 and 112! 
or equivalent and one semester of general chemistry or consent I 
of instructor. Basic concepts of the ecosystem and community, , 
aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and population ecology; com- ■ 
plemented by field and laboratory activities. Three lectures and : 
one three-hour laboratory per week. 

525 Limnology. Four credits. Prerequisites: 1 2 hours of biology in- • 
eluding BIOL 524 and one semester of general chemistry or con- • 
sent of instructor Biological, chemical, and physical aspects of i 
lakes and streams. Not open to students who have had Aquatic : 
Ecology. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

526 Nature Study. Three credits. Prerequisite: One semester of biol- 
ogy. Identification of local plants and animals and a consider- 
ation of the ecological principles governing them. Two lectures 
and one two-hour laboratory, 

532 Seminar: Advancements in Biology. Two credits. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing or consent of instructor. A broad 
overview of biological principles and recent research develop- 
ments. Two lectures. 

533 A-Z Biome Analysis. One to four credits. Prerequisite: Junior 
or senior standing or consent of instructor. An intensive class- 
room and on-site study of a specific biome with special empha- 
sis on data collection and analysis. Consult department head 
for specific credits and costs. 

539 Ethology. Four credits. Innate and learned animal behavior in 
primitive and advanced animals including behavior associated 
with space, reproduction, and food getting. Three lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory. 

546 Human Genetics. Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 212. 
Application of the fundamental laws of inheritance to humans. 
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. 

550 Plant Physiology. Four credits. Prerequisites: 1 2 hours of biol- 
ogy including BIOL 212 and one semester of organic chemistry. 
Plant growth; development and metabolism at the cellular and 
whole plant levels. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory. 



Biology 55 



Food/Industrial Microbiology. Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 
21 6 or equivalent. The interaction between microorganisms and 
food and industrial processes of importance to humans. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

Plant Anatomy. Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 1 1 2 or equiva- 
lent. Plant cells, tissues, and organs. Emphasis on the survival 
value of the plant's various structural features. Three lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory. 

A-Z Topics in Environmental Education. One to four credits. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above or consent of instructor. 
An intensive classroom and field study of natural science and 
resources in Tennessee. Special emphasis on data collection, 
analysis, and problem solving. Target groups are graduate stu- 
dents and upper-division undergraduates in the areas of biol- 
ogy and education. Consult the department chair for specific 
credits and costs. This course will not apply to the biology major 
or minor. 

Biotechnology. Three credits. Prerequisites: 12 hours of biol- 
ogy to include microbiology (BIOL 216), senior/graduate level, 
and consent of instructor. Instruction in both theory and appli- 
cation of current research methodologies in biology and mo- 
lecular biology. Topics included immunochemistry, polymerase 
chain reaction, restriaion enzyme analysis, and electrophore- 
sis. One two-hour block and one three-hour block which in- 
cludes both lecture and laboratory. 

Neurobiology. Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 1 1 1 or PSY 403 
or 424 or consent of instructor. Introduces comparative neuro- 
biology. Topics include the basic structure and function of the 
nerve cell and organization of nervous systems of representative 
species of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Three hours lec- 
ture and three hours laboratory. 

Principles of Toxicology. Three credits. Prerequisites: 8 hours 
of biology and 1 2 hours chemistry including one semester of 
organic chemistry. Adverse effects of chemical agents on living 
organisms; current toxicological techniques in laboratory por- 
tion of course. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 

Marine Biology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 112; 
two semesters of chemistry. Introduction to biological, chemi- 
cal, and physical characteristics of major marine environments 
and their associated flora and fauna. Three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory. 

Advanced Dendrology. Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 
or equivalent. Woody plants with special emphasis on classifica- 
tion, identification, and literature of important timber trees of 
North America. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

Plants and Man. Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 11 2 or equiv- 
alent. Human dependence on plants emphasized. Topics in- 
clude origin of agriculture, fruits and nuts, grains and legumes, 
vegetables, spices and herbs, oils and waxes, medicinal plants, 
psychoactive plants, beverages, fibers and dyes, tannins, wood 
and ornamental plants. Three lectures. 

Advanced Mycology. Four credits. Prerequisites: Graduate stand- 
ing plus BIOL 112 and 21 6 or equivalent. Fungi, with emphasis 
on taxonomy, morphology, culture, and importance to humans. 
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

Aquatic Ecology. Three credits. Physical, chemical, and biotic 
conditions of freshwater lakes and streams and of population 
structure and dynamics in these environments. Not open to stu- 
dents who have had Limnology. Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory. 



613 Ornithology. Three credits. Structure, taxonomy, natural his- 
tory, and identification of birds. Emphasizes field work. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory. 

618 Mammalogy. Three credits. Morphology, physiology, systemat- 
ics, and the development of mammals. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory. 

620 Speciation. Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 212 or equiva- 
lent. Mutation, natural selection, adaptation, isolating mecha- 
nisms, genetic drift, hybridization, ploidy in the process of spe- 
cies formation, and a history of the development and ideas of 
evolution. Two lectures. 

621 Protozoology. Three credits. Morphology, physiology, repro- 
duction, ecology, taxonomy, and life cycles of the protozoa. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

622 Herpetology. Three credits. Morphology, natural history, and 
identification of amphibians and reptiles. Local representatives 
emphasized. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

627 Cell Metabolism. Three credits. Prerequisites: Organic chemis- 
try and one course in physiology or biochemistry or permission 
of instructor. Metabolic pathways in cells including regulation 
and genetic aspects of metabolism. 

629 Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy. Four credits. Prereq- 
uisites: 12 hours of biology or equivalent as determined by in- 
structor and permission of instructor. Application of scanning 
electron microscopy to study materials with emphasis on theory 
of scanning electron microscopy and preparation of biological 
specimens for microscopy. One lecture and six hours labora- 
tory. 

633 Principles of Physiology. Four credits. Prerequisites: 1 2 hours 
of chemistry and 12 hours of biology. Physical and chemical 
properties of protoplasm, cells, and organisms and their rela- 
tionships to life processes. Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory. 

635 Biostatistical Analysis. Four credits. Prerequisites: 1 2 hours of 
biology and college algebra. Intermediate-level introduction to 
biostatistical procedures used in research. Three lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory. 

636 Energy Dispersive X-Ray Theory and Analysis. One credit. Pre- 
requisite: Scanning electron microscopy. Theory of X-ray analy- 
sis and elemental analysis of materials using an energy disper- 
sive X-ray system with scanning electron microscopy. One three- 
hour laboratory. 

638 Experimental Immunology. Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 216 
or consent of instructor. Mechanisms of immunity including the 
more recent developments in immunology. Three lectures and 
one two-hour laboratory. 

639 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology. Four credits. Prerequi- 
sites: 1 2 hours of biology, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. 
Molecular biology of the cell with emphasis on current experi- 
mental techniques. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory. 

640 Medicinal Plants. Three credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or 
equivalent. Plants affecting human health, including poisonous, 
psychoactive, and remedial plants. Ethnotwtanical and modern 
medicinal uses are treated. Three lectures. 

641 Advanced Transmitting Electron Microscopy. Four credits. Pre- 
requisites: 1 2 hours of biology and permission of instructor. Ul- 



56 



645 



650 



662 



664 



665/ 
666 



trastructure of the cell using basic and specialized techniques. 
One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. 

Clinical and Pathogenic Microbiology. Four credits. Prerequi- 
site: BIOL 216. Comprehensive coverage of the most recent 
discoveries and techniques used for the identification of patho- 
genic organisms and their relationships to disease processes. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

Advanced Virology. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 216 and 
chemistry. Emphasizes the main virus families and their biochemi- 
cal composition. Experimental approaches and techniques will 
be developed in order to identify and manipulate viruses. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

Advancements in Molecular Genetics. Four credits. Prerequi- 
sites: BIOL 212 and 216 plus one year of chemistry. Recent 
advancements in microbial genetics and gene manipulation with 
emphasis on applications of molecular genetics, including gene 
regulation and recombinant DNA technology. Three lectures and 
three one-hour laboratory periods. 

Conservation Biology. Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 524 or 
equivalent. Measuring biodiversity: species, ecosystem, and ge- 
netic diversity. Topics include conservation ethics, extinctions, 
habitat degradation, exotic species, and management of popu- 
lations and ecosystems. Meets six hours per week for lecture 
and laboratory. 

Special Problems in Biology. Four credits. Designed to give stu- 
dents an opportunity to plan, implement, and interpret a re- 
search problem in some area of biology. Available topics limited 
to areas of graduate faculty interest and expertise. 

Biological Research. Three credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, and execution of the research. 

Biological Literature. Three credits. Literature sources, forms 
of literature, bibliographic methods, scientific writing. Two lec- 
tures. 

Thesis Research. One to six credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
BIOL 662. Completion of the research problem begun in BIOL 
662; preparation of the thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. Minimum of three credits required 
for M.S. degree. S/U grading. 

Seminar. One credit each. Discussion of recent advances and 
problems in biology. Individual problems for oral and written 
reports. 



Field Station Affiliation 

MTSU is an affiliate of the Gulf Coast (Miss.) Research Labo- 
ratory. Certain courses in nnarine biology nnay be taken for 
graduate credit and transferred to MTSU. See department 
head for list of courses. 



Business 
Administration 



Troy Festervand, Assistant Dean and Director of 
Graduate Business Studies, College of Business 
Business and Aerospace Building N222A/B 

The University offers a Master of Business Administra- 
tion degree which requires courses in the Departments 
of Accounting; Economics and Finance; Computer In- 
formation Systems; and Management and Marketing. 
See departmental listings in this catalog for complete 
course descriptions. 

The director of graduate business studies also serves as : 
advisor for the M.S. in Accounting and Information Sys- 
tems. (See pages 46,62.) 

Application Process 

A complete application package consists of the gradu- 
ate application, application fee, official transcripts from i 
all collegiate institutions attended, and official GMAT 
score report. 

Deadlines for Completed Applications: Fall - July 1; 
Spring - December 1; Summer - April 1. Completed! 
application packages received after the deadline will I 
be evaluated based on the date received. 



Requirements for the 

Master of Business Administration 

Candidate must 

1 . be admitted to the program (see page 24). For admis- 
sion, a student must meet one of the following: 

a. CPA X 200 + GMAT = 950 

or Upper Division CPA x 200 -t- GMAT = 1,000 

b. International students must comply with the following pro- 
vision: For undergraduate degrees from foreign institutions 
where a grade point average cannot be clearly established 
but where that work is thought to be equivalent to domestic; 
grades of B or higher, admission eligibility may be determined 
by the GMAT score. A score of at least 450 is required for 
unconditional admission under such circumstances. Prepa- 
ratory work taken in institutions with grading systems paral- 
leling that of most United States institutions must conform 
to a B average. 

2. complete the following foundation courses before en- 
rolling in core courses listed in 3. a. below:* 

ACTC 600 Survey of Accounting Principles, 3 hours 

INFS 601 Survey of Information Systems Issues, 3 hours 

Q M 600 Quantitative Methods Survey, 3 hours 

ECON 603 Survey of Economic Theory, 3 hours 

FIN 600 Survey of Financial Management, 3 hours 

MCMT 600 Management and Operations Concepts, 3 hours 



57 



MCMT 600 Management and Operations Concepts, 3 hours 
MKT 600 Marketing Concepts, 3 hours 
BLAW 643 Legal Environment of Management, 3 hours 
In addition to the above, it is desirable that all students in the 
College of Business be proficient in keyboarding and basic com- 
puter skills. Students should develop these proficiencies prior to 
taking College of Business courses in which these skills are typi- 
cally used. To develop proficiency in keyboarding, students may 
take BMOM 1 00, Keyboarding on the Computer. Basic computer 
skill may be developed by taking INFS 220, Introduction to 
Microcomputing. 

'Some or all of these courses may be waived by the director of 
graduate business studies based upon an analpis of previous courses 
completed. 

3. follow a program which stresses interrelationships of func- 
tional business areas and which requires a total of 36 
semester hours, at least 30 of which must be at the 600 
level. NOTE: Core courses may not be satisfied by inde- 
pendent study. 

a. Core courses: all candidates will take the following 24 se- 
mester hours: 

ACTC 691 Accounting and Business Decisions 
(Undergraduate Accounting majors 
should take another 600-level accounting 
course.) 

ECON 600 Managerial Economics 

FIN 671 Financial Analysis 

MCMT 660 Study of Organizations 

MCMT 665 Seminar in Operations Management 

MKT 680 Marketing Management 

INFS 661 Information Systems Management 
and Applications 

B AD 698 Business Policy (The student will Uke 698 
in the last semester only.) 

b. Global/international elective: 3 semester hours 

(Student should see the director of graduate business studies 
for a current list of courses that meet the global/international 
requirement.) NOTE: Independent studies may not be used 
to satisfy this 3-hour elective. 

c. Elective Cognate: 6 semester hours 

(choose 6 hours from approved electives in same field) 

d. Approved elective: 3 semester hours 

(Course taken to satisfy this elective requires prior approval 
of the director of graduate business studies.) 
NOTE: Independent study course requested to satisfy this elec- 
tive must be accompanied by a research proposal which has 
been approved by the supervising faculty member, appropri- 
ate departmental chair, and director of graduate business stud- 
ies. 

e. A student who has had substantial undergraduate instruc- 
tion in accounting, economics, finance, information systems, 
management, or marketing may be required, as determined 
by the director, to take an alternate 600-level course in the 
same area of instruction in lieu of the required graduate 
course. 

4. A Candidacy Form will be prepared when an applicant is 
approved for admission to a graduate business program. 

5. B AD 698, Business Policy, includes the required com- 
prehensive written examination for the M.B.A. This course 
should be taken during the student's last semester and 
after completing the following courses: ACTC 691 , INFS 
661, ECON 600, FIN 671, MCMT 660 and 665, and 
MKT 680, or the equivalent. 



Department of 
Business Education^ 
Marketing 
Education^ and 
Office Management 



Linda McGrew, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building N429C 

A Master of Business Education is offered by the De- 
partment of Business Education, Marketing Education, 
and Office Management. Advisement for the degree is 
provided by graduate faculty members in this depart- 
ment. A minor in Business Education is offered at the 
graduate level. 

Requirements for the 

Master of Business Education (M.B.E.) 

Normally, the required test score for admission to the pro- 
gram is 30 on the Miller Analogies Test or a satisfactory Gradu- 
ate Record Examination score. 

Candidate must 

1 . complete 33 semester hours with no more than 30 per- 
cent of the total degree hours dually listed as undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours; 

2. have at least 24 semester hours of undergraduate busi- 
ness subjects; 

3. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

4. successfully complete a written comprehensive exami- 
nation (may be taken no more than twice); 

5. meet licensure requirements to teach business subjects 
upon completion of the degree or select the nonteaching 
option. 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 



BMOM 571 



BMOM 662 
BMOM 678 



History and Foundations of Business Education and 
Marketing Education* 

Research in Business and Marketing Education 
Problems in Business Education, Marketing 
Education, and Vocational Office Education 



'Students who complete this course at the undergraduate level may 
substitute another three-hour graduate level course in business or mar- 
keting education. 

BMOM, FOED, and SPSE electives will be chosen in consultation with 
BMOM advisor or department chair. 

A non-licensure training and development specialization includes BMOM 
541 and 545. Electives for this specialization will be chosen in consul- 
tation with BMOM advisor or department chair. 



58 BMOM 



Courses in Business Education^ 
Mari<eting Education, and 
Office Management [BMOM] 

520 A-Z Problems in BE/ME/OM. One, two, or three credits. Pre- 
requisites: Graduate standing and consent of department chair. 
Individual research, reading analysis, or projects in contempo- 
rary problems and issues in concentrated area of study under 
direction of a faculty member. May be taken twice. 

521 Innovatiorts and Problems In Accounting. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: ACTG 211 and 21 2 or approval of instructor. A short 
history of accounting and data processing including aims, evalu- 
ation of textbooks, teaching strategies, testing, and course con- 
tent. 

523 Innovations and Problems in Keyboarding Applications. Three 
credits. Analysis of innovations, research, and problems affect- 
ing typewriting/keyboarding performance. Emphasis is on areas 
such as objectives and goals, psychological principles, teaching 
methodology and procedures, learning theories, course content, 
standards, and assessment. 

524 Materials and Methods in Basic Business. Three credits. Analy- 
sis of objectives, materials, research, and appropriate instruc- 
tional strategies for developing teaching strategies and delivery 
systems in basic business courses such as introduction to busi- 
ness, economics, international business, business communica- 
tion systems, American business/legal systems, business man- 
agement, marketing, and introduction to finance. 

525 Innovations and Problems in Office Technology. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: BMOM 233 or equivalent. Instructional strate- 
gies in office technology including objectives, testing, audio- 
visuals, course content, basic programming, and standards. 

534 Word Processing Administration. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
BMOM 233 and 234 or equivalent. Development of necessary 
skills for administrators of word processing centers. Word pro- 
cessing feasibility, development, and implementation for busi- 
ness using a total information processing concept. Students de- 
velop a thorough knowledge and refine skills using various ap- 
plication software. 

535 Records Management. Three credits. Equipment and systems 
used for information storage, transmission, and retrieval. Filing, 
microfilming, tape processing, storage system design, form us- 
age, and other information management functions in the office. 

541 Managerial Media Presentations. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
BMOM 233 or equivalent knowledge of computers. Presenta- 
tions in business and classroom environments. Emphasis on the 
communication process; audience analysis; presentation design 
and planning; media integration; innovative delivery techniques; 
equipment, software, and material selection; and evaluation cri- 
teria. 

545 Training Strategies for Business Systems and Technology. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: BMOM 441 or equivalent. Corpo- 
rate learning specialist activities such as design, development, 
delivery, and evaluation of learning programs for a business envir- 
onment. Focuses on adult learning theories with emphasis on 
professional learning activities related to innovative corporate 
educational programs. 

551 Business Report Writing. Three credits. Prerequisite: BMOM 
351 or equivalent. Nature, general functions, and present need 
of reports in industry. Recognizing, organizing, and investigat- 



ing problems preparatory to writing reports and construction 
and writing of distinctive business and technical reports. 

552 Instructional Strategies in Marketing Education. Three cred- 
its. Develops competence in techniques of teaching with em- 
phasis on problem-solving and demonstration procedures. Em- 
phasizes teaching-learning evaluation. 

560 Organization and Administration of Marketing Education Pro- 
grams. Three credits. Organizing marketing education programs 
at the secondary and post-secondary levels; emphasizes youth 
organizations, techniques of coordination, and administrative 
procedures. 

Problems in Office Management. Three credits. Evaluation of I 
significant research in office management. Observations in lo- ■ 
cal business offices and visits to managers and identifying and 1 
solving office problems. 

Organizational Communications. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
BMOM 351 or equivalent. Research and analysis of case studies • 
of significant research; case studies in business communication; ; 
communication policies, principles, and procedures from the i 
executive's viewpoint. 

International Business Communication. Three credits. Provides ; 
a theoretical and practical framework for understanding and con- 
ducting effective international business communication. Empha- 
sis on the analysis and development of international business ! 
communication processes. 

Diversity in the Workplace. Three credits. Emphasis on develop- 
ing skills essential for working effectively with a diverse work • 
force in global and domestic settings, incorporating the value of 
diversity into organizations, and building multicultural worki 
teams. 

History and Foundations of BE and ME. Three credits. Devel- 
opments, aims, principles, and present status of business educa- 
tion; organization and evaluation of the business education cur- 
riculum; administration and supervision of business education. 

Consumer Education. Three credits. Opportunity to develop) 
understandingof relationship of consumer education to instruc- 
tional program in business. Emphasis on sources of information! 
and formulation of a conceptual framework essential to the de- 
cision-making process. 

576 Concepts and Implementation of VOE. Three credits. Concepts: 
of office education related to instructional programs in business' 
education; emphasis on the application of teaching procedures' 
related to vocational programs in business. 

580 Administrative Office Simulation. Three credits. Prerequisites! 
BMOM 233 and 234 or equivalent. A culmination course which I 
could serve as a transition from the traditional classroom atmo- 
sphere to the administrative office atmosphere. Primary emphasisi 
on information and administrative management and controlled! 
decision making through simulation experiences. 

581 Internship Program. Three credits. Prerequisites: BMOM 233 
and 234 or equivalent. A supervised program requiring 300 hours' 
of related work experience in a marketing or office position. 
Provides experience of the application of theory into practice. ■ 

631 History and Philosophy of BE/MEA'OE. Three credits. Histori- 
cal development, philosophy, and objectives of business and 
marketing education. Contributions to general education, voca- 
tional education, and adult education. Curriculum in relation 
to future needs, objectives, and social change. 



564 



566 



567 



568 



571 



573 



59 



662 Research in Business and Marlceting Education. Three credits. 
Introduction to research methods, tools, and interpretation of 
research data. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

665 A-Z Worl(shop in BE and/or ME. Three credits. Innovations in 
marketing education and/or business education. Special pro- 
grams and organizations featured. 

667 Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Business 
Education. Three credits. Administrative problems of a school 
system. Emphasis on those of the supervisor of business educa- 
tion, the department head, and the teacher as to reorganiza- 
tion, budgets, curriculum, equipment, personnel, adult educa- 
tion, and public relations. 

670 Coordination of Cooperative Programs. Three credits. Orga- 
nization of such programs and their characteristics in combin- 
ing classroom instruction with regularly-scheduled supervised 
experience and on-the-job training. 

672 Measurement and Evaluation in BE and ME. Three credits. 
Teacher-made, standardized, and industry-developed tests and 
other standards used in teaching, used to evaluate student 
achievement, and used by industry for employment and pro- 
motion. 

677 Vocational Guidance in BE and ME. Three credits. Developing 
teacher competence through utilization of occupational infor- 
mation, surveys, and job analysis to determine community op- 
portunities and requirements for employment, placement, and 
promotion in preparing students for careers in business. 

678 Problems in BE/MEA'OE. Three credits. Individualized research 
projects in special areas of concern to teachers of business edu- 
cation, marketing education, and vocational education and to 
trainers in business and industry. 

681 Recent Developments in Basic Business. Three credits. Present 
status and trends affecting content of basic business courses, 
aims, objectives, learning aids, motivation devices, resource 
materials, and current research. 

682 Managerial Communication. Three credits. Analysis of com- 
munication theory and communication processes with empha- 
sis on development of executive communication skills essential 
for understanding organizational processes from a wholistic per- 
spective. Covers organizational theory, behavior, and interper- 
sonal communication from both a domestic and global perspec- 
tive. 

Recent Developments in Office Technology. Three credits. 
Trends in teaching office technology; selecting classroom equip- 
ment and applications software, setting standards of achieve- 
ment for job competencies, developing proficiency in applica- 
tions of current software, analyzing supportive instructional tech- 
nologies and materials, and assessing instructional issues in cur- 
rent research and writings. 



Department of 
Chemistry 



Earl Pearson, Chair 

Davis Science Building 239 

The Department of Chemistry offers a Master of Sci- 
ence degree with a major in Chemistry and the Doctor 
of Arts in Chemistry; also offered is a minor in Chemis- 
try at the graduate level. 

The required test score for admission to the M.S. pro- 
gram is a satisfactory Graduate Record Examination 
score. For admission to the D.A. program, a score of 
900 on the GRE is expected. 

Requirements for the Master of Science 
(500 and 600 level) 

chemistry 

Candidate must 

1 . have an undergraduate minor in chemistry or its equiv- 
alent at time of admission; 

2. complete a minimum of 30 semester hours including a 
thesis of 3 semester hours with no more than 30 percent 
of the total degree hours dually listed as undergraduate/ 
graduate hours; 

3. complete CHEM 662, 663, 664, plus one course from 
five of the following six areas: 

Inorganic Chemistry - CHEM 606, 622 
Analytical Chemistry - CHEM 523, 623 
Organic Chemistry - CHEM 524, 624 
Physical Chemistry - CHEM 529, 629 
Biochemistry - CHEM 525, 625, 635 
Applied Chemistry - CHEM 528, 570, 670 
The remaining courses may come from courses in chem- 
istry or approved cognate courses in biology, mathemat- 
ics, and physics. 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

Requirements for the Doctor of Arts 
(500, 600, and 700 level) 

1 . Candidate must have completed undergraduate prereq- 
uisites of at least 18 semester hours of chemistry at the 
undergraduate level and at least 20 semester hours at 
the master's level. 

2. There are two alternatives: 
Alternative #1 

48 semester hours above the master's level with at least 
two-thirds of the program on the 700 level. 



60 Chemistry 



Work in the major teaching field will consist of at least 
24 semester hours of classwork, plus 6 semester hours of 
internship/externship, plus 6 semester hours for the dis- 
sertation. 
Alternative #2: 

60 semester hours above the master's level with at least 
two-thirds of the program on the 700 level. 500-level 
courses may not be applied. 

Work in the first teaching field will consist of at least 18 
semester hours of classwork in chemistry, with that in 
the second teaching field consisting of at least 1 8 semes- 
ter hours of classwork in anything which is offered as a 
major at the master's level (see exceptions, page 38), 
plus 6 semester hours of internship/ externship, plus 6 
semester hours for the dissertation. 

3. The core of professional education, 12 semester hours, 
consists of FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

4. A doctoral advisory committee will be appointed. 

5. Candidacy Form must be filed with the Graduate Office 
prior to the completion of 24 credit hours. 

6. Qualifying examinations as described on page 39 must 
be completed. 

7. Defense of the proposed dissertation and preparation of 
the dissertation: 

a. The Dissertation Prospectus 

The dissertation prospectus should conform to the 
specifications given on page 40. 

b. Type of Dissertation 

Guidelines for selecting the research and disserta- 
tion topic are given on page 40. 

c. The Defense of Dissertation Seminar 
Guidelines are given under the discussion of the D.A. 
degree on page 40. After the candidate has success- 
fully defended the proposed problem, it is assumed 
that he/she will develop, with the supervision of the 
advisory committee, this proposed problem into a 
complete dissertation. The candidate will be noti- 
fied in writing of the committee's approval. 

Courses in Chemistry [CHEM] 

Graduate standing and consent of instructor are prerequi- 
sites for graduate courses in chemistry. The 500-level courses 
also have the same prerequisites as listed for the correspond- 
ing 400-level courses in the undergraduate catalog. 

501/ Physical Chemistry Fundamentals. Four credits each. Modern 
502 physical chemistry including current theories of atomic and mo- 
lecular structures, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, 
chemical kinetics, and related theoretical topics. Three lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period. 

516 Inorganic Chemistry. Three credits. Basic concepts and theo- 
ries of inorganic chemistry and how these are used to predict 
and understand the physical and chemical properties of com- 
pounds of the elements other than carbon. Inorganic compounds 
in the air, water, earth, and in the laboratory, and in biochemis- 
try, geochemistry, and industrial materials and processes. 

521/ Physical Chemistry. Four credits each. Quantitative principles 

522 of chemistry involving extensive use of calculus. Major topics 

include thermodynamics, phase changes, chemical equilibria. 



electrochemistry, reaction kinetics, quantum chemistry, molec- i 
ular structure, and statistical mechanics. Three lectures and one • 
three-hour laboratory period. 

I 

523 Instrumental Analysis. Four credits. Potentiometric titration 
polarographic, coulometric, gas chromatographic, ultraviolet, vis- 
ible, and infrared absorption, and atomic absorption techniques 
of analysis. Requirements and limitations of each technique and 
the applications to various chemical systems emphasized from 
both a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. Three lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

524 Advanced Organic Chemistry. Four credits. Application of both i 
classical and instrumental methods of qualitative organic analy- 
sis. Practice in the interpretation of mass, infrared, ultraviolet I 
and NMR spectra. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory period . 

525 Biochemistry. Four credits. Modern biochemistry including en- 
ergy relationships in the cell, enzyme kinetics, metabolism, and 
intracellular and extra-cellular phenomena. Three lectures and : 
one three-hour laboratory period. 

528 Polymers, an Introduction. Three credits. Their structure, prop- 
erties, and applications. 

529 Advanced Physical Chemistry. Four credits. Modern chemical 
concepts and computations applied to quantum chemistry mo- 
lecular spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics. Three lec- 
tures and one three-hour calculation laboratory period. 

535 Clinical Biochemistry. Five credits. Prerequisite: Admission to: 
an affiliated medical technology program. An intensive class- 
room/laboratory treatment of principles and procedures of clini- 
cal biochemistry. 



570 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry. Three credits. Qual- 
ity of the environment and of chemical changes in the environ- 
ment through contamination or modification of the air, water, 
and soils as affected by human, agricultural, industrial, and so- 
cial activities. 



i 



571 Detection of Chemical Pollutants. Four credits. Theory and: 
practice of analytical chemistry methods used in pollution meas- 
urement. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. 

t 

606 Transition Metal and Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 516 or consent of instructor. The 
chemistry of transition metal complexes, organometallic com- 
pounds, and of related compounds, their practical applications, 
and modern theoretical treatments of this chemistry. Three hoursti; 
of lecture. 

616 A,B Laboratory in Inorganic Chemistry. One credit each. Pre-' i; 
requisite or corequisite: CHEM 606 (for 61 6A), CHEM 622 or 
CHEM 528 (for 61 6B), or consent of instructor. 

A. Inorganic synthetic methods 

B. Physical methods in inorganic chemistry 

rii 

622 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Three to six credits. Selected 
topics of current interest in organic chemistry such as organo- 
metallic chemistry, symmetry and group theory, physical meth-' 
ods of characterizing inorganic compounds, inorganic materials! \] 
science, and kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic reactions 

tH 

623 Topics in Analytical Chemistry. Three to six credits. Selected 
topics of major interest in chemical analysis. 



Chemistry 61 



(24 Topics in Organic Chemistry. Three to six credits. A selection 
of modern topics. 

(25 Biochemistry. Three credits. Enzymes and enzyme action. Theo- 
retical aspects of enzyme kinetics, stereospecificity, and mod- 
ern techniques of studying enzyme mechanisms. 

(29 Topics in Physical Chemistry. Three to six credits. Advanced 
theories of, latest literature in, and unsolved problems of a par- 
ticular research area in physical chemistry selected by the pro- 
fessor. 

(35 Advanced Biochemistry II. Four credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 
525. Structure of lipids, amino acids, purine/pyrimidine nucle- 
otides, and nucleic acids and their metabolism at a molecular 
level. Emphasis on understanding the chemical basis of biologi- 
cal phenomena. 

(62 Chemistry Research. Three credits. Original laboratory prob- 
lem that will furnish material for a thesis. 

(63 Chemistry Seminar. One credit. Required of graduate students 
specializing in chemistry. Scientific articles reviewed and reports 
on individual research projects presented. 

(64 Thesis Research. One to six credits per semester. Selection of a 
research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and 
analysis of data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, stu- 
dent should register for at least one credit hour of master's re- 
search each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

165 Individual Research. Three credits. Limited to and required of 
all graduate students in chemistry who expect to do research 
using university facilities in any semester or term when the stu- 
dent is not registered for any other course. This course may be 
repeated as many times as is necessary for the research to be 
completed. F^ss/fail grading. 

JO Environmental Soil Chemistry. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
I Working knowledge of physical and organic chemistry. Funda- 
mental chemical principles applied to the fate and behavior of 
organic and inorganic contaminants in the soil-water environ- 
ment. Topics include sorption and redox reactions of contami- 
nants. 

Topics in Theoretical Chemistry. Three to six credits. Bonding, 
stereochemistry, empirical and semi-empirical parameters, state 
functions, spectroscopic interpretation, and reaction mecha- 
nisms. 

Topics in Applied Chemistry. Three to six credits. Some impor- 
tant and current practical applications. 

13 Problems in Modern Chemical Laboratory Procedures. Three 
credits. Newly developed laboratory techniques and procedures 
which the student had not previously had the opportunity to 
learn. 

14 Independent Study of Instrumental Analysis. Three credits. 
Developing skill in using selected sophisticated instruments. 

50/ Chemistry Internship. Three credits each. 



Dissertation Research. One to six credits. Selection of a re- 
search problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and 
analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, 
student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral 
research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 



Courses in Physical Science [SCI] 

Graduate standing and consent of instructor are prerequisites 
for graduate courses in physical science. 

500 Problem in Physical Science. Four credits. A problem from 
chemistry, physics, or other physical science appropriate to the 
student's background and interest. 

542 Experimental Physical Science. Four credits. Basic concepts, 
laws, and principles of astronomy, chemistry, geology and physics 
with particular emphasis on the utilization of equipment avail- 
able or easily improvised in actual school situations to illustrate 
these concepts, laws, and principles. 

666 Investigations in Physical Science. One, two, or three credits. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instruct. Topics 
from astronomy, to chemistry, and physics, with special empha- 
sis on the development of hands-on activities, determination of 
content cognitive demand, development of appropriate assess- 
ment instruments/implementation plans, and implementation 
of these across the pre-college curriculum. For practicing pre- 
college science teachers and school administrators. Consult the 
listed instructor for costs and specific credits. This course will 
not apply towards chemistry graduate degrees. 




62 



Department of 
Computer 
Information Systems 



Lee Maier, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building N333C 

The Department of Computer Information Systems of- 
fers the Master of Science in Accounting and Informa- 
tion Systems with information systems as the primary 
field. The department also offers courses for the Master 
of Business Administration degree. A minor in Informa- 
tion Systems is offered for students seeking a master's 
degree other than the M.B.A. The director of graduate 
business studies serves as advisor for the M.S. in Ac- 
counting and Information Systems. 

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the op- 
portunity to take a balance of information systems and 
accounting courses; however, there is significant flexi- 
bility in the requirements to allow a student's program 
to be specialized to the extent desired for particular 
career goals. 

The prerequisites for a student seeking an M.S. degree 
In the department are the same as those required for 
the M.B.A. degree plus instruction in international busi- 
ness. A recent graduate of an AACSB -accredited pro- 
gram would normally possess an adequate background 
in these prerequisites. 

A student electing Information Systems as a primary field 
may be required to complete additional prerequisites 
including Quantitative Methods Survey, QM 600; Busi- 
ness Policy B AD 498; and INFS 601, Survey of Infor- 
mation Systems Issues. Completion of prerequisite 
courses does not reduce the hours necessary for comple- 
tion of degree. Students without formal training or ex- 
perience in computer programming are strongly encour- 
aged to take COBOL Programming, INFS 272, and 
Advanced Programming, INFS 476 (576). A portion of 
these requirements may be satisfied in conjunction with 
the student's graduate studies. 

To be admitted to the M.S. program (see page 24), a 
student must meet one of the following: 

a. CPA X 200 + GMAT = 950 

or Upper Division CPA x 200 + GMAT = 1,000 

b. International students must comply with the following provision: 
For undergraduate degrees from foreign institutions where a grade 
point average cannot be clearly established but where that work 
is thought to be equivalent to domestic grades of B or higher, 
admission eligibility may be determined by the GMAT score. A 
score of at least 450 is required for unconditional admission un- 



der such circumstances. Preparatory work taken in institutions with 
grading systems paralleling that of most United States institutions 
must conform to a B average. 

Requirements for the Master of Science 

Information Systems as Primary Field; 
Accounting as Secondary Field: 

Required 

INFS 671 Systems Analysis 

INFS 679 Seminar in Database Management 

Q M 677 Quantitative Computer Applications Seminar 

ACTC 691 Accounting and Business Decisions 

(or approved substitute) 

INFS 698 Information Systems Practicum 

Electives 

Three hours from ACTG at the 500 or 600 level 

Three hours in ACTC or INFS at the 500 or 600 level 

Six hours in INFS at the 600 level 

Three hours in international/global course at the 600 level 

Additional Requirements 

INFS 698 must be passed with a grade of B or higher with a 
maximum enrollment of two times. 

The degree is to be completed within six years from the time 
of admission to the degree program. 

No foreign language or thesis is required in the program. 

Courses in Information Systems [INFS] 

520 Microcomputer Database Applications. Three credits. Prerequ 
site: 6 hours of information systems including INFS 220 or equiv- 
alent. Database system design, implementation, querying, anc 
applications development in a microcomputer environment. 

576 Advanced Programming. Three credits. Prerequisite: INFS 272 
Functional programming experience in structured programming 
techniques; top-down design; advanced file handling and main 
tenance techniques to include sequential, indexed sequential 
direct, and relative file organization; interactive, menu-driver 
applications; and uploading/downloading programs to a centra 
site. Requires extensive laboratory work. 

579 Data Base Techniques I. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours o 
information systems. Fundamental concepts: conventional dat; 
systems, integrated management information systems, data bast 
structure systems, data integration, complex file structure, onlim 
access systems. Emphasis on total integrated information sys 
tems data base and data base management languages. 

583 Data Base Techniques II. Three credits. Prerequisite: INFS 479| 
579. A continuation of INFS 479/579; emphasis on more ad 
vanced techniques of data base construction and utilization 
individual projects of complex nature with extensive use of dat; 
base languages. 

590 Seminar in Data Communications. Three credits. Prerequisite 
6 hours of information systems. Current topics in the field o 
data communications. 

601 Survey of Information Systems Issues. Three credits. Topic 
include Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), Data Resoura 
Management, and Information Resource Management. Incor 
porates various microcomputer applications software packages 



Computer Information Systems 63 



May not be used for elective credit in graduate business de- 
gree programs. 

Survey of Data Processing for Business Education. Three cred- 
its. Comprehensive review of the fundamentals of information 
systems. Credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. in Accounting/Infor- 
mation Systems degree will not be granted. 

Information Systems Management and Application. Three 
credits. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and INFS 310 or 601. 
Focuses on utilization of computing resources in managerial con- 
text. Students will develop an understanding of issues and 
implications of information resources and end-user computing 
as well as develop skills in application of these concepts in a 
problem-solving oriented microcomputer system environment. 

Systems Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: INFS 310 or 601. 
Practical explanation of the total systems concept and a knowl- 
edge of systems design and implementation. Student is expected 
to apply knowledge gained in other courses through the suc- 
cessful completion of a "real-world" systems project. Required 
course for the M.S. in Accounting/Information Systems. 

Seminar In Decision Support Systems. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: INFS 310 or 601. Examines the broad area of Manage- 
ment Support Systems. Includes coverage of concepts and is- 
sues surrounding decision support systems, expert systems, and 
executive information systems. Software packages used to solve 
application problems chosen from appropriate business areas. 




674 Strategic Information Systems. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 
graduate hours of information systems. Focuses on the use of 
information system (IS) and information technology (IT) in the 
strategic management process in business organizations. Empha- 
sis on the strategic view of IS and IT and their impact on organi- 
zational strategy. Use of IS and IT to support prominent generic 
strategy models and how IS and IT aid applying the principles of 
those generic strategic models. 

675 Seminar in Global Information Systems. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: INFS 310 or 601 or permission of instructor. Exam- 
ines the managerial, operational, and strategic implications of 
information and communication technology in the global con- 
text. Particular emphasis on the strategic dimension. 

679 Seminar in Database Management. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: INFS 310 or 601. Advanced topics in computer-related 
information systems as found in current literature and practical 
application. Advanced information structures and data manage- 
ment concepts applied in the design of computer-based infor- 
mation systems. Additional topics include data structures as 
applied to distributed processingsystems, computer system com- 
ponent resource allocation, and data communication systems 
design. Significant computer application projects required. 

690 Business Data Communication Management. Three credits. 

Prerequisite: INFS 310 or 601 or permission of instructor. Man- 
agement and use of data communications technologies to sup- 
port the operations of businesses. Practical experiences in the 
use of data communications technologies, such as local area 
networks, the Internet, distributed computing, and distributed 
databases. 

698 Information Systems Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
6 hours graduate credit in information systems and last semes- 
ter of program. Project-oriented; emphasizes development and 
implementation of tools and techniques for the assessment of 
information systems in organizations. Capstone course for In- 
formation Systems majors and must be taken last semester prior 
to graduation. 

699 A, B Independent Research In Information Systems. Three 
credits. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of depart- 
ment chair. Provides individual research, readings analysis, or 
projects in contemporary problems and issues in a concentrated 
area of study under the direction of an appropriate faculty mem- 
ber. Maximum credit applicable toward degree may not exceed 
six credits. 



Courses in Quantitative Methods [QM] 

600 Quantitative Methods Survey. Three credits. Quantitative meth- 
odologies to assist in the decision-making process. Emphasis on 
applied statistics and decision sciences topics that are practical, 
useful, and of wide application for business analysis. May not 
be used for elective credit in graduate business degree pro- 
gram. 

677 Quantitative Computer Applications Seminar. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: QM 362 or 600. Advanced techniques in quantita- 
tive methods. Modeling and optimization techniques. Compu- 
ter applications emphasized. 

696 Statistical Methodology and Analysis. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: QM 362 or 600. Descriptive and inferential statistical con- 
cepts with the use of expert systems to assist in the selection of 
appropriate design and methodology. Utilization of common 
packages for problem solution and analysis. 



64 



Department of 
Computer Science 



Richard Detmer, Chair 
Kirltsey Old Main 306 

The Department of Computer Science offers the Mas- 
ter of Science with a major in Computer Science and a 
minor at the graduate level. 

Normally, the required test score for admission to the 
Master's program is 30 on the Miller Analogies Test or a 
satisfactory Graduate Record Examination score. 

Requirements for the Master of Science 

Candidate must 

1 . have completed an undergraduate minor in computer 
science, or the equivalent, which consists of 1 8 semester 
hours including CSCI 1 1 7 (high-level programming lan- 
guage), CSCI 217 (introduction to data structures), and 
CSCI 316 (assembly language programming). 

2. have completed MATH 221 , Calculus and Analytic Ge- 
ometry II, or the equivalent, and one semester of statis- 
tics; 

3. complete 30 semester hours including a thesis of 3 se- 
mester hours and a major of 1 8 semester hours of com- 
puter science, or if a thesis is not written, 36 semester 
hours with a major of 24 semester hours (if a minor is 
elected, it must include a minimum of 1 2 semester hours); 

4. complete at least two one-year course sequences in com- 
puter science, selected with the consent of the advisor 
(available core sequences are CSCI 516-619, 525-626, 
530-630, 533-613, 535-635, 556-656, 570-618, 580- 
618,625-645,635-655); 

5. complete at least 70 percent of the program at the 600 
level; 

6. complete 6 semester hours of approved research tools 
with grades of C or better on the undergraduate or gradu- 
ate level; 

7. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

8. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination over two sequences from the approved list and 
two additional 600-level courses that are not from the 
same areas as the sequences (may be taken no more 
than twice); 

9. present an oral defense if a thesis is elected; if a thesis is 
not elected, then an oral presentation on an approved 
computer science topic is required (Pass/Fail, may be re- 
peated only once). 



Courses in Computer Science [CSCI] 

513 Microprocessor Operation and Control. Three credits. Prereq- j 
uisite: CSCI 316. Digital systems based around microcomput- 
ers, microcomputer architecture, logic replacement, memory 
design, timing considerations, input/output design, interfacing, 
robotics, and total system design. 

516 Compiler Analysis and Design. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
CSCI 311 and 316. The various phases of a compiler along with 
grammars and finite automata. A term project consisting of the 
design and construction of a functional compiler required. 

525 Computer Graphics. Three credits. Prerequisites: CSCI 31 1 and 
31 8 or consent of instructor. Topics include vector drawing dis- 
plays, raster scan displays, input devices and techniques, graph- 
ics software, transformations, projections, interpolation, and ap- 
proximation. 

530 Data Communication and Networks. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: CSCI 325. Computer network architectures, protocol hier- 
archies, and the open systems interconnection model. Model- 
ing, analysis, design, and management of hardware and soft- 
ware on a computer network. 

533 Parallel Processing Concepts. Three credits. Prerequisites: CSCI 
313, 325, anda working knowledge of either Cor C+ + . Intro- 
duces basic concepts in parallel processing and programming in 
a parallel environment. Topics include classification of parallel 
architectures, artual parallel architectures, design and imple- 
mentation of parallel programs, and parallel software engineer- 
ing. 

535 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: CSCI 21 7 or equivalent. Principles and applications of arti- 
ficial intelligence. Principles include search strategies, knowl- 
edge representation, reasoning, and machine learning. Appli- 
cations include expert systems and natural language understand- 



556 Data Base Management Systems. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
CSCI 311. The relational and object models of data base design 
along with relational algebras, data independence, normal forms, 
logical and physical views, query languages, and current litera- 
ture. 

560 Independent Study in Computer Science. One to six credits. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Students wishing to enroll 
must submit a written course/topic proposal to the department 
prior to the semester in which CSCI 560 is taken. Proposal must 
be approved prior to taking the course. At the conclusion of the 
course, each enrollee will submit a written summary of the 
project. 

570 Software Engineering. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 311. 
Consists of a theoretical component and a practical component 
Topics include the history of software engineering, software de- 
velopment paradigms and life cycles, and computer-aided soft- 
ware engineering (CASE). A team project will be developed in 
parallel with the theory. 

580 Software Testing. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 21 7 and 308. 
Integrates theory and applications of software testing techniques. 
Provides actual hands-on testing experience. Considers multiple 
testing paradigms. 

585 Neural Nets. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 308. Various 
neural net architectures, theory, and applications, including" 
models such as Perceptron, back propagation, Kohonen, ART 
and associative memory. Learning and conditioning methods 
also studied. 



Computer Science 65 



Selected Topics in Computer Science. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: CSC! 217. Advanced topics in computer science to be se- 
lected and announced at time of class scheduling. May be re- 
peated for up to six credits total. 

Analysis of Algorithms. Three credits. Prerequisites: CSCI 311 645 

and 308 or consent of instructor. Topics include the analysis 
and design of algorithms; efficiency of algorithms; design ap- 
proaches including divide and conquer, dynamic programming, 
the greedy approach and backtracking; P and NP; and algo- 
rithms in many areas of computing. 

655 
Selected Topics in Parallel Processing. Three credits. Prerequi- 
sites: CSCI 313 and 325 or permission of instructor. An in-depth 
investigation of one or more topics in parallel processing, Topic(s) 
to be selected by the professor. Possible topics include parallel 
algorithms, parallel programming languages, parallel program- 
ming tools, parallel software engineering, parallel architectures, 
parallel applications, and parallel VLSI. 656 

Software Design and Development. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: CSCI 217. State-of-the-art techniques in software design 
and development; provides a means for students to apply the 
techniques. 

Theory of Compilers Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 41 6/516. 660 

Introduces theory of parsing methods as well as symbol table 
construction, code optimization, run time storage management, 
and Implementation of recursion. 

Advanced Operating Systems. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 
325. Topics include concurrent processes, name management, 
resource allocation, protection, advanced computer architec- 
ture, and operating systems implementation. 

Advanced Computer Graphics. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 
425/525. Topics include three-dimensional curves and surfaces, 662 

projections, hidden line and surface elimination, raster graphics 
systems, and shading techniques. 

Networks. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 325 or consent of 
instructor. Computer communications, network architectures, 
protocol hierarchies, and the open systems interconnection 
model. Modeling, analysis, and specification of hardware and 
software on a computer network. Wide area networks and local 664 

area networks including rings, buses, and contention networks. 

Artificial Intelligence. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 311 or 
equivalent. In-depth study of the principal areas of the field: 



machine learning, artificial intelligence programming, problem- 
solving methods, knowledge representation methods, deduc- 
tion and reasoning, and applications such as data mining and 
expert systems. 

Operating System Design. Three credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 
625. Definition, design, and implementation of a significant 
operating system proven from such areas as file systems, pro- 
cess management, memory management, time sharing, input/ 
output device management, and user interface. 

Introduction to Symbolic and Algebraic Manipulation. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: CSCI 311. Techniques for algebraic mani- 
pulation on the computer. Includes symbolic differentiation and 
integration, extended precision arithmetic, polynomial manipu- 
lation; introduces one or more symbolic manipulation systems. 
Automatic theorem provers considered. 

Advanced Data Base Management Systems. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: CSCI 556. A consideration of the problems and oppor- 
tunities inherent In distributed database on a network. Includes 
file allocation, directory systems, deadlock detection and pre- 
vention, synchronization, query optimization, rollbacks, secur- 
ity, and fault tolerance. 

Selected Topics in Computer Science. Three credits. May be 

repeated for up to six credits total. Prerequisites: A solid foun- 
dation in undergraduate Computer Science and any prerequi- 
sites determined by the Instructor. An in-depth investigation of 
one or more topics in computer science. Topic(s) to be selected 
by the professor Possible topics include search techniques, for- 
example genetic algorithms, soft computing, object-oriented 
software engineering, expert systems, program verification, soft- 
ware quality, knowledge discovery In data bases, and design of 
embedded software systems. 

Research Methods in Computer Science. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Nine hours of graduate work in computer science. 
Research tools used In computer science examined. Student will 
select a research problem with approval of the Instructor, re- 
view pertinent literature, and produce a report using the manual 
of thesis writing currently approved by the College of Graduate 
Studies. 

Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 




66 



Department of 
Criminal Justice 
Administration 



Frank Lee, Chair 
Vaughn House 6 

The Department of Criminal Justice Administration of- 
fers a Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) degree in 
cooperation with Tennessee State University. A minor 
in Criminal Justice at the graduate level is also offered 
at MTSU. Normally, the required test score for admis- 
sion to the Master of Criminal Justice program is 25 on 
the Miller Analogies Test or a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Record Examination. To be considered for Fall 
admission, an applicant's materials must be received by 
June 1 5; for Spring admission, November 1 ; and for Sum- 
mer admission, April 1 5. 

A graduate student may not enroll in more than 12 total 
hours in any given semester. This limitation applies to Crimi- 
nal Justice graduate students who may be simultaneously 
enrolled at both TSU and MTSU. Any student exceeding 
the hours-per-semester limit will be dropped from a course 
or courses to the twelve-hour level. A student may on rare 
occasion, be given permission for an overload, but the 
proper overload form must be executed before courses 
begin and under no circumstances will the overload ex- 
ceed three hours, or a total of 1 5 hours. 

General Requirements for the 
Master of Criminal Justice 

Candidate must 

1 . have completed a minimum of 1 8 hours of work at the 
undergraduate level in criminal justice or an approved 
equivalent; 

2. complete a total of 36 hours (1 8 hours at MTSU and 1 8 
hours at TSU) with no more than 30 percent of the total 
degree hours dually listed as undergraduate/graduate 
hours including the following core courses: 

Middle Tennessee State University - Fall Semester Only 
CJA 600 Criminal Justice Administration, 3 hours 
CJA 601 Law Enforcement Seminar, 3 hours 
Tennessee State University - Spring Semester Only 
CJA 602 Judicial Seminar, 3 liours 
CJA 603 Contemporary Corrections, 3 hours 

3. file a candidacy form after having completed 10 semes- 
ter hours credit and before having completed 1 6 semes- 
ter hours credit. Candidate must have maintained an 
average grade of 3.00 or above on all work attempted. 
No fewer than 10 and no more than 16 semester hours 
may be counted toward the degree before the individual 



is advanced to candidacy. Indicate research/thesis insti- 
tution at this time. 

4. complete the following 6 hours at one institution (MTSU 
or TSU) 

CJA 690 Research in the Criminal Justice Process, 3 hours 
CJA 664 Thesis Research, 3 hours 

5. complete the remaining 1 8 hours of approved electives 
as follows: 

1 2 hours at the non-thesls/research institution 
6 hours at the thesis/research institution 

6. successfully complete an oral comprehensive examina- 
tion in conjunction with the thesis defense. 

Courses in Criminal 
Justice Administration [CJA] 

522 Community Relations and Minority Problems. Three credits. 
Analysis of public hostility toward police and current commu- 
nity relations projects; training and education of law enforce- 
ment officers; responsibilities of police administrators; causes 
of tension and conflict, positive and negative factors in the con- 
trol of minority group hostilities; minority recruitment in law 
enforcement. 

526 Special Issues in Law Enforcement. Three credits. Variety of 
subtopics related to law enforcement. Problems in private and 
public morality with regard to drug use, alcoholism, and sex 
offenses; analysis of current police training programs; relation- 
ship between legislation and political process which affects law 
enforcement. 

533 Criminal Investigation. Three credits. (For CJA majors or with 
permission of instructor.) General investigative responsibilities 
and techniques, including administration preparation, investi- 
gative jurisdiction and responsibility, and the importance of sub- 
stantive report writing. Includes special techniques required for 
specific investigative categories. 

550 Thejuvenilejustice System. Three credits. Juvenile delinquency 
and youth crime with emphasis on the history of the juvenile 
justice system, the court and police role within the system reha- 
bilitation and correction of the delinquent, and juvenile proba- 
tion services. Alternatives to traditional procedures: community- 
based programs versus correctional institutions, nonjudicial ad- 
justment, etc., examined. 

553 Criminal Evidence and Procedures. Three credits. Types of indi- 
viduals and problems of admissibility in court proceedings, 
proper treatment and disposition of evidence, legal procedure 
to be followed, and actual trial procedure. 

575 Seminar in Corrections. Three credits. Each student selects a 
problem area of interest for an intensive research effort. The 
group will be presented with a contemporary corrections issue 
or problem and will be required to create practical and work- 
able strategies for coping with the issue. Where feasible, arrange- 
ments will be made to implement the program in an actual cor- 
rectional setting. 

580 Crime in America: An Assessment. Three credits. An in-depth 
survey of the impact of crime on American society: amount and 
trends of crime, economic impact of crime, professional and 
white collar crime, characteristics of offenders and victims of 
crime. • 



Criminal Justice Administration 67 



590 Readings In Criminal Justice. Three credits. Advanced students 
capable of independent study will be allowed to do in-depth 
readings in a particular area of criminal justice relevant to indi- 
vidual interests. Annotated bibliography and report required. 
Arrangements for this course should be made with the instruc- 
tor prior to registration. 

600 Criminal Justice Administration. Three credits. Criminal jus- 
tice, juvenile justice, correctional and mental health processes, 
and other issues including those arising out of other processes 
of social control and community-based treatment of offenders. 
Development of a critical analysisof current literature, compila- 
tion of a bibliography, and completion of an intensive research 
paper required. 

601 Seminar in Law Enforcement. Three credits. The function of 
police within the community and its relationship to the criminal 
justice system, the effects of police actions toward the community 
and to other segments of the system, social expectations and 
limitations, assessment and special problems. Analysis of rele- 
vant studies, formation of annotated bibliography, and organi- 
zation of research into a formal composition. 

602 Judicial Seminar. Three credits. Examination of the judicial sys- 
tem, including flow of the criminal case, personnel, court com- 
munity relations, computers and the courts, and special prob- 
lem areas. A research project consisting of a literature review, 
bibliography, and a thorough analysis required. 

603 Contemporary Corrections. Three credits. Corrections programs 
in contemporary custodial and juvenile institutions and com- 
munity-based corrections programs; problems and prospects 
associated with them. Each student required to make class pre- 
sentations on assigned topics, participate in class discussions and 
analysis of reports, develop a bibliography, and submit a research 
paper in a specific area of corrections. 

604 The Concept of Justice. Three credits. Historical development 
and philosophy of law. The notion of justice in a criminal con- 
text, with emphasis on equity and ethics in law and justice. Ex- 
amines the sociology of law and societal constraints on pro- 
scribed behavior. 

623 Police Management Systems. Three credits. The need for aware- 
ness of police management problems, reaction of criminal jus- 
tice system within RM.S., administrative behavior toward the 
organizational environment, and the nature of change within 
RM.S. Preparation of a research paper which consists of com- 
plete analysis of a topic within RM.S., a review of recent litera- 
ture, and an annotated bibliography required. 

625 Criminal Justice Internship. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Student placed for an intensive field expe- 
rience in a functional criminal justice agency. The selection of 
the placement agency determined by student's background, 
academic status, and interest. 

630 Innovations in Law Enforcement. Three credits. The changing 
role of the police function and its relationship to the criminal 
justice system, including evaluation of the operational line func- 
tion of the 80s, technological changes in society and their ef- 
fects on law enforcement, and the etiology of innovation. Evalu- 
ation of recent literature, compilation of a list of selected read- 
ings, and unification of research into a methodological exposi- 
tion. 

641 Advanced Constitutional Law. Three credits. Examination of 
constitutional rights of the accused including pretrial, trial, and 
prisoner rights. Reading and critique of current literature and 
Supreme Court decisions, learning to function in a law library. 



and composing a research paper with a bibliography on a cho- 
sen constitutional topic. 

643 Criminal Law: The Defense Side. Three credits. Procedure of 
the criminal courts from the defense viewpoint. ABA standards 
for defense attorneys, the handling of a case by the defense 
from arrest to appeal, and ethical problems posed for defense 
attorneys. Attention given to defense by appointment and plea 
bargaining. 

650 Interviewing and CounselingJuveniles. Three credits. Introduc- 
tion to the causal theories of delinquency, application of theory 
to treatment, caseworker attitudes, and counseling styles. Dis- 
cussion of individualized models for classification and treatment 
as well as group and process models. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

670 Community-Based Corrections. Three credits. Intensive sur- 
vey of probation and parole at both the adult and juvenile lev- 
els. Halfway houses, work-release programs, and other commu- 
nity correctional settings. Impact of the "justice model" upon 
community corrections featured. 

683 Violence and Victimology. Three credits. Impact of violence 
on victims at both the adult and juvenile levels examined. Other 
major topics include the right to treatment, victims as witnesses, 
victims in the correctional system, and societal reaction to vio- 
lence. 

690 Research in the Criminal Justice Process. Three credits. Intro- 
duces research methods, including the experiment and experi- 
mental methods and models, survey research, participant ob- 
servation, case studies, unobtrusive measures, the use of offi- 
cial and unofficial statistics, validity, reliability, and data analy- 
sis. Special emphasis on ethics in criminal justice research and 
on proposal writing and evaluation research. 

692 Seminar in Criminal Justice Planning and Management. Three 
credits. Intensive introduction to principles of planning and man- 
agement in the system. Students required to actively participate 
in planning exercises and to utilize data from actual situations 
for the development of appropriate management strategies. 

693 Comparative Systems of Criminal Justice. Three credits. Sys- 
tems in the U.S. and Great Britain, New York, and London. 
Examination of crime and justice in northern and southern Eu- 
rope, the Soviet Union, and Canada. Discussion of progressive 
criminal policy and the U.N. and the uses of comparative analy- 
sis of current literature and formal exposition on a related topic. 

694 Crimes, Criminals, and Their Treatment. Three credits. An 
intensive exploration of the various systems of criminal typol- 
ogy, including a survey of the various theories of criminal be- 
havior and a survey of institutional treatment methods currently 
in use. Extra-institutional treatment methods also examined. 

695 Business and Industrial Security. Three credits. Examination 
of the scope of the problem, the economic impact, major prob- 
lems (security, employee theft, shoplifting, industrial espionage). 
Discussion of the responsibility and effectiveness of the crimi- 
nal justice system, programs for prevention and training of em- 
ployees, managers, and security personnel. Preparation of an 
extensive research paper which analyzes an assigned topic and 
summarizes current trends in the literature required. 



68 



Department of 
Economics and 
Finance 



John Lee, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building N329C 

The mission of the graduate program in economics is to 
provide students with advanced studies in economic 
theory and research methodology. To accomplish its 
mission the Department of Economics and Finance of- 
fers two degree programs: the Master of Arts (M.A.) with 
a major in Economics and the Doctor of Arts (D.A.) with 
a major in Economics. The Department's approach to 
these degree programs is global, interactive, and inno- 
vative. In the M.A. program, students are offered three 
curricular paths: general economics. Industrial Relations, 
and Financial Economics. M.A. students in economics 
are offered preparation for careers in private business 
and public service. The focus of the M.A. program is on 
decision analysis and applied research. D.A. students 
in economics are trained for teaching careers in higher 
education. The D.A. provides students with the oppor- 
tunity to combine advanced training in economics with 
educational pedagogy and applied research. 

The required test score for admission to both masters' 
programs is 30 on the Miller Analogies Test or a satis- 
factory score on the Graduate Records Examination 
(CRE). Admission to the doctoral program normally re- 
quires a score of 900 or better on the CRE. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts 
(500 and 600 level) 

1 . Candidates entering tlie M.A. program must have com- 
pleted certain foundation courses. Each candidate's 
record is carefully examined to determine whether these 
functional areas have been satisfactorily covered in pre- 
vious academic work. The foundation areas include: 
Intermediate-level Macroeconomics 
Intermediate-level Microeconomics 
Intermediate-level Quantitative Methods 

The M.A. advisor will notify the student of any deficien- 
cies in the foundation courses. Students lacking work in 
these areas must take the requisite undergraduate 
courses. 

2. Candidates for the M.A. in Economics or the M.A. in 
Economics with a concentration in Industrial Relations 
must complete aminimumof30 semester hours if a thesis 
is written or a minimum of 33 semester hours if a thesis 



is not written. At least 24 semester hours must be in 
courses numbered exclusively as 600-level graduate 



Major in Economics 

1. Candidates choosing a major in economics must com- 
plete a minimum of 18 semester hours of economics 
including ECON 61 1 , 61 2, and 662. 

2. Candidates can include a minor in their degree programs. 
A minor comprises 1 2 hours of approved courses. A list 
of graduate minors can be found on page 19. 

3. Students not electing a minor can include a cognate area 
of up to 6 semester hours in their program. Cognate ar- 
eas can be formed from courses in such fields as account- 
ing, agriculture, finance, geography and geology, history, 
industrial studies, insurance, management, marketing, 
mathematics, political science, psychology, real estate, 
and sociology. 

4. The student, with the assistance of the M.A. advisor, must 
file a Candidacy Form prior to the completion of 24 credit 
hours. 

Major in Economics with a Concentration in 
Financial Economics 

The mission of the concentration in Financial Economics is to 
provide students with the intellectual foundation and techni- 
cal skills needed to enter careers as financial economists and 
analysts in private companies and public agencies. The Eco- 
nomics major with a concentration in Financial Economics 
requires the general M.A. core courses: ECON 61 1 , 61 2, and 
662. In addition, a candidate must complete ECON 646, 673 
and FIN 671, 674. An additional six hours of guided elec- 
tives must be chosen from the following courses: ECON 643, 
645, 653, FIN 672 or 686. The remaining six hours are gen- 
eral electives. The M.A. advisor must approve the selection 
of the general electives. 

Major in Economics with a Concentration in 
Industrial Relations 

1 . Candidates choosing the Industrial Relations concentra- 
tion must complete the following courses: ECON 600, 
562 (or 662), 650, 651 , and 539. An additional 9 hours 
must be completed from the following courses: ECON 
652, 644 (Industrial Relations topic only), 551, 549, and 
542. Students without substantial experience in the field 
of industrial relations are strongly encouraged to com- 
plete ECON 542, 549, and 551 as initial courses in the 
Industrial Relations concentration. Up to 9 credits of sub- 
stitutions may be made by passing competency tests ad- 
ministered and evaluated by industrial relations faculty. 
Courses designated for possible substitutions are 539, 
542, 549, and 551 . Before taking the competency tests 
the student, industrial relations faculty, and M.A. advisor 
will agree on the courses to be substituted for those ne- 
gated by any successfully passed competency exams. The 
remaining credit hour requirements are electives. Courses 



Economics and Finance 69 



listed above and not selected to fulfill the above require- 
ments may be taken as electives, but students are strongly 
encouraged to consider interdisciplinary options from the 
following: management, engineering technology and in- 
dustrial studies, psychology, sociology, actuarial science, 
political science, and school personnel service educa- 
tion. The M.A. advisor in consultation with the industrial 
relations faculty must approve acceptable courses. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

1. Candidates must successfully complete a written com- 
prehensive examination that may be taken no more than 
twice. For the major in Economics the comprehensive 
examination covers the three core areas: macroeconom- 
ics, microeconomics, and econometrics I. For the major 
in Economics with a concentration in Financial Econom- 
ics the comprehensive examination includes macroeco- 
nomics, microeconomics, and a financial economics field 
examination. For the major in Economics with a concen- 
tration in Industrial Relations the comprehensive exami- 
nation encompasses four types of competencies: 

a. applied technical analysis relevant to industrial rela- 
tions practice including time values, regression analy- 
sis, and other computational methods that are gen- 
erally based on ECON 539, 542, 600, 651, or 662 
(or 562); 

b. conceptual synthesis of Industrial Relations theory, 
applications, and issues from required and elective 
course content, and 

c. a specialty area defined by collaboration between 
the student, M.A. advisor, and Industrial Relations 
faculty, e.g., legislation and regulation of labor mar- 
kets and employment, demographic influences upon 
the workplace, and technology change and the work- 
place. 

d. a synthesis of international issues taken from the 
content in the core and elective courses. 

2. Before taking the comprehensive examination, the stu- 
dent is expected to attend and actively participate in regu- 
larly scheduled departmental student/faculty workshops 
where research papers are presented and discussed by 
the participants. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Arts 
(500, 600, and 700 level) 

1 . There are two alternatives available: 
Alternative #1 

A program with a single teaching field: 48 semester hours 
above the master's level with at least two-thirds of the 
program on the 700 level. 500-level courses may not be 
applied. Work in economics will consist of at least 24 
semester hours of classwork, plus 6 semester hours of 
internship, plus 6 semester hours for the dissertation. 
Alternative #2 

A program with two teaching fields: 60 semester hours 
above the master's level with at least two-thirds of the 
program on the 700 level. 500-level courses may not be 



applied. Work in economics will consist of at least 18 
semester hours of classwork, plus 6 semester hours of 
internship, plus 6 semester hours for the dissertation. 
Work in the second teaching field will consist of at least 
18 semester hours of classwork in any subject which is 
offered as a major at the master's level (but see excep- 
tions, page 38). 

2. Prerequisites for Alternative #1 include at least 1 8 hours 
of economics at the undergraduate level and 20 hours at 
the master's level. Students who elect Alternative #2 
must also have completed at least 18 hours of under- 
graduate credits in the second teaching field except when 
the second teaching field selected is a business area. If 
the second teaching field selected is a business subject, 
then the student must complete the undergraduate pre- 
requisite or foundation courses for the M.B.A. listed un- 
der item #2, page 56. Since Business Administration is 
broadly defined to cover several different business disci- 
plines, a second teaching field in this area could include 
courses in either finance, accounting, information sys- 
tems, management, or marketing. 

3. A core of professional education must be completed and 
will consist of at least 12 semester hours, which must 
include FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

4. A doctoral committee will be appointed. 

5. The student, with assistance of the graduate advisor, must 
file a Candidacy Form prior to the completion of 24 credit 
hours. 

6. Qualifying examinations as described on page 39 must 
be completed. Before the qualifying examination, the 
student is expected to attend regularly scheduled de- 
partmental faculty/student workshops and make at least 
two workshop presentations. If Business Administration 
is selected as a second teaching field, qualifying exami- 
nation requirements for that field are satisfied by the suc- 
cessful completion of B AD 698 Business Policy. 

7. The student must successfully defend a dissertation pro- 
spectus and then prepare the dissertation. 

a. The Dissertation Prospectus 

The dissertation prospectus should conform to the 
specifications given on page 40. 

b. Type of Dissertation 

Guidelines for selecting the dissertation topic are 
given on page 40. 

c. The Defense of Dissertation Seminar 
Guidelines are given under the discussion of the D. A. 
degree on page 40. After the candidate has success- 
fully defended the proposed problem he/she will 
develop, with the supervision of the advisory com- 
mittee, this proposed problem into a complete dis- 
sertation. The candidate will be notified in writing of 
the committee's approval. 

Courses in Economics [ECON] 

531 Problems in Government Finance. Three credits. Comparison 
of state and local fiscal organization, administration, and budg- 
etary policy and procedures. Special attention given to compar- 
ing the revenue and expenditure structure of Tennessee and its 
major subdivisions with those of neighboring states. 



70 Economics and Finance 



539 Employee Benefits. Three credits. (Same as FIN 539.) Includes 
descriptive review and taxation, legislative, and administrative 
dimensions of the major components of employee benefit plans 

such as retirement systems, deferred compensation plans, health 590 

insurance, death benefits, disability benefits, paid and unpaid 
time off. Technical analysis and problem solving emphasized to 
develop applied skills. Social insurance and international ben- 
efits integrated. 

540 Business and Government Three credits. Examination of the struc- 599 
ture, conduct, and performance of American industries; public 
policies toward business; economic analysis of these policies. 

542 Labor and Human Resource Economics. Three credits. Cur- 600 

rent issues and theories, returns to training and education (hu- 
man capital), earnings differences; theoretical interpretation and 
empirical economic impacts of unions, government regulation, 
and international forces upon labor relations and labor mar- 
kets; human resource information systems (spreadsheet appli- 
cations) and integration of Internet information sources and fo- 
rensic analysis. 

544 International Economics. Three credits. Differences between 
domestic trade and international trade and foundations of in- 
ternational trade; economic effects of free trade and restricted 
trade; mechanisms of international payments and structure of 
balance of payments; history and contemporary issues of trade 
policies and world monetary systems. 

547 Economic Development of the Third World. Three credits. Con- 
ditions and problems of the less developed countries; causes, 
processes, and consequences of economic development; intro- 
duction to basic growth models, development theories, and strat- 
egies for development. Economic as well as non-economic fac- 
tors studied. 

549 Industrial Relations Legislation Three credits. Effects of do- 
mestic and international legislation and regulation of govern- 
ments on the practical functions of labor markets and employ- 
ment relations in the public and private sectors. Specific dimen- 
sions include unions and other collective and collaborative in- 
stitutions, workforce diversity, and the impacts of technology. 
Domestic and international electronic resources are heavily in- 
tegrated into learning experiences based on research and analy- 
sis. 

551 Unions and Collective Bargaining. Three credits. Collective 
bargaining contract administration and alternative dispute reso- 
lution mechanisms. Information technology tools. Analytical 
focus on the impacts of total compensation agreements, strike 
strategies, and the interdependent influences of the union and 643 

non-union sectors of the economy Practical cases emphasized. 
A brief international comparative survey of unions and other 
collective relationships included. 

562 Econometrics and Forecasting. Three credits. Prerequisites: QM 
261 and MATH 344 or equivalent. Application of mathematical 
and statistical techniques to economic problems. Introduces 
econometric model construction and estimation and related 
problems. Requires use of econometric computer package. 

566 History of Economic Thought. Three credits. The historic back- 
ground of modern economic thought. Ancient economic 644 
thought; the main current of developing economic analysis 
through Feudalism, Mercantilism, and the Physiocrats; Adam Smith 
and the classical economists; Twentieth-century contributors. 

589 Internship in Economics. Three credits. Prerequisite: Gradu- 645 

ate status and recommendation of advisor. Supervised work 
experience in cooperating business firms or government agen- 



603 



611 



612 



640 



cies together with specialized academic study relating to the 
work experience. 

Mathematical Methods for Economists. Three credits. Appli- 
cations-oriented; reviews essential concepts of algebra and cov- 
ers the basics of matrix algebra, differential and integral calcu- ■ 
lus, including unconstrained and constrained optimization and 
the fundamentals of dynamic analysis. 

Problems in Economics. Three credits. Problems for intensive 
study are chosen in joint consultation between student and in- 
structor. 

Managerial Economics. Three credits. Prerequisites: ECON 241 
and 242 or 457 or equivalent. Primarily for M.B.A. students with 
particular attention given to business administration and finance 
topics including demand analysis, production and cost decisions, 
quantitative market analysis, capital budgeting, and alternative 
theories of the firm. Special emphasis on case studies, software 
applications, and interpretation of economic meanings of re- 
lated analyses. 

Survey of Economic Theory. Three credits. Overview of micro 
and macro economic principles with an emphasis on applica- 
tions to decision making in a competitive market environment. 
May not be used for elective credit in graduate business de- 
gree programs. 

Advanced Macroeconomics. Three credits. Prerequisites: ECON 
351 and 590 or permission of the instructor. Measurement con- 
cepts in macroeconomics, schools of macroeconomic thought, 
traditional models of aggregate demand and supply, open . 
economy models and issues, and new approaches to macro- 
economics. Computer applications. 

Advanced Microeconomics. Three credits. Intensive review ofl 
the structure of microeconomic theory including optimization! 
algorithms, envelope theory, preference axioms, intertemporal 
choice, alternative forms of cost and production functions, behav- 
ior under uncertainty, pricing information, market strategies, game 
theory, general equilibrium, social choice and externalities. 

Economics of Health Care. Three credits. Applications of 
microeconomics to analysis of the health care delivery system in 
the United States. Major issues include the private and public de- 
mand for health care, supply of health care, cost of health care, the 
pricing of health care, and the analysis of the various health care 
reform policies of the industry. Examines how economics can pro- 
vide valuable insights into the above problems of social choice. 

Seminar on Public Finance. Three credits. (Same as FIN 643.) 
Examines the role of government in the allocation and distribu- 
tion of society's resources. Topics include theories of govern- 
ment sector growth, public and quasi-public goods, externali- 
ties and agency theory, transitivity and completeness of voting 
preferences, income redistribution and economic justice, social 
insurance, health care programs, tax shifting and incidence analy- 
sis, efficiency and equity in taxation, and efficiency and redis- 
tributive aspects of deficit financing. Topics may involve case 
studies such as budget formulation, environmental policies, pay- 
roll taxes, and alternative tax structures. 

Special Topics in Economics. Three credits. Independent study 
of a particular topic selected by the student and approved by 
the instructor. Provides an opportunity to study special areas oi 
interest for which regular courses are not offered. 

SeminaronMonetary Policy. Three credits. (Same as FIN 645. 
Prerequisite: ECON 321 or equivalent recommended. Objec- 
tives and limitations of monetary policy, alternative monetary 



Economics and Finance 71 



theories underlying policy decisions and the controversy among 
theories, transmission channels of monetary policy, alternative 
strategies used to achieve the objectives of monetary policy, 
practical considerations in the execution of monetary policy, 
global linkages and monetary policy, and the effects and conse- 
quences of policy decision on economic activity and business 
decisions. 

646 Seminar on Financial Markets. Three credits. (Same as FIN 646.) 
Prerequisite: FIN 300 or 301 or 600 or equivalent. Credit flows 
within the U.S. and the global economies, the economic and 
financial forces influencing the general level of interest rates and 
the relationship among interest rates, the characteristics of key 
short- and long-term financial assets, new financial instruments, 
derivative instruments, global financing linkages, global linkages 
among financial instruments and among national economies, and 
interest rate risk, including the measurement and means of protec- 
tion. 

647 Seminar in Economic Growth and Development. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: ECON 447 or equivalent recommended. Satis- 
fies the M.B.A. international course requirement. Critical analy- 
sis of causes, processes, and consequences of economic devel- 
opment; evaluation of various policies and strategies for eco- 
nomic development; introduction to advanced growth models 
and theories. Special emphasis on the less developed countries. 

650 Modern Issues in Labor and Industrial Relations. Three cred- 
its. A survey of labor market and employment relations issues 
evolving in our changing economic environment. Coverage in- 
cludes the concepts of efficiency, equity, and ethics of market 
and institutional behavior and economic issues related to work 
force demographics and work place organization. Distinction 
drawn between cooperative and competitive models of eco- 
nomic organization and outcomes in the employer-employee 
relations environment. Internet labor market information sources 
and international comparisons incorporated. 

651 Theory and Analysis in Labor Economics and Industrial Rela- 
tions. Three credits. Prerequisite: ECON 457 or 600 or 442/ 
552 (or equivalent of either). Recommended prerequisites: 
Courses or equivalent experience involving financial computa- 
tions, spreadsheet applications, and statistical software. Micro 
and macro theory of labor demand and supply and government 
policy implications, economic theory and measurement of hu- 
man capital, returns to education, discrimination, income dis- 
tribution, and impacts of international trade. 

652 Special Media Projects. Three credits. Non-traditional learning 
experiences. Approval includes faculty and student written 
mutual agreement and conformance to departmental standards 
for independent study. Examples of special projects include pro- 
duction of CDs, DVDs, cable TV programming, Internet projects, 
internships that clearly add non-redundant learning experiences, 
or highly applied projects that demonstrate the integration of 
information technologies into mainstream business or other or- 
ganization decision making. 

653 Advanced International Economics Three credits. Prerequisite: 
ECON 544 or equivalent background recommended. Advanced 
study of the key topics covered and introduction to other topics 
not covered in ECON 544. Critical examination of major issues 
and evaluation of latest theories in international trade and mon- 
etary relations. 

654 Japanese Society and Business. Three credits. (Same as SOC 
671.) Japanese economy, business practices, and social and 
physical environment in comparison with those in other coun- 
tries, particularly the United States. 



655 A, B Studies in Economic Development. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: ECON 547 or equivalent recommended. Analysis and 
evaluation of processes of economic development with focus 
on a specific area of the United States or of the world. Area 
covered varies. 
A. Pacific Asia 

662 Econometrics I. Three credits. (Same as FIN 662.) Prerequisite: 
ECON 462 or equivalent. Focuses on the use of regression analy- 
sis in economics. Emphasis on using econometric software pack- 
ages to investigate actual economic problems. A prerequisite 
for ECON 663. 

663 Econometrics II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ECON 662 or per- 
mission of instructor Covers more advanced topics in econo- 
metrics, including recent model adequacy tests, Box-Jenkins time 
series analysis, dynamic modeling, systems of equations, dis- 
crete and limited dependent variable models, pooled regres- 
sion. Emphasizes practical applications in various computing 
environments. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

673 Seminar on Financial Institutions. Three credits. (Same as FIN 
673.) Focus on the common and distinctive aspects of the pro- 
vision of financial services and the management of risk associ- 
ated with those services. Roles, characteristics, and operation of 
financial institutions, constraints that these institutions face in 
meeting that objective, regulatory environment within which 
they operate, risks that they face and the management of those 
risks, evolution experienced during the 1980s and 1990s, and 
the probable course of change in the years ahead. 

71 1 A,B Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: ECON 61 1 and 662 or approved equivalents. ECON 
645 is recommended. Selected topics in macroeconomics. 

71 2 A, B Topics in Advanced Microeconomics. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: ECON 566, 612, and 662 or approved equivalents. 
Selected topics in microeconomics. 

760 Economic Internship. Three credits. Prerequisites: FOED 752 
and SF*SE 755. Supervised teaching of undergraduate econom- 
ics courses. 

761 Economic Internship. Three credits. Prerequisites: FOED 752 
and SPSE 755. Supervised teaching of undergraduate econom- 
ics courses. 

764 Dissertation Research. One to six credits. Selection of a re- 
search problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and 
analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, 
student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral 
research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

Courses in Finance [FIN] 

536 Management of Financial Institutions. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: FIN 321 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Application 
of principles of institution management with a focus on opera- 
tions, policy-making, asset, liability, and capital management of 
commercial banks and non-bank financial institutions. 

539 Employee Benefits. Three credits. (Same as ECON 539.) In- 
cludes descriptive review and taxation, legislative, and adminis- 



72 Economics and Finance 



trative dimensions of the major components of employee ben- 
efit plans such as retirement systems, deferred compensation 
plans, health insurance, death benefits, disability benefits, paid 
and unpaid time off. Technical analysis and problem solving 
emphasized to develop applied skills. Social insurance and in- 
ternational benefits integrated. 

543 Real Property Valuation. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 245 
or consent of instructor; FIN 301 strongly recommended. Theory 
and methods of real property valuation. Qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis incorporated to appraise residential and income- 
producing properties. Comparable sales, cost-depreciation, and 
income capitalization analysis emphasized. 

559 Problems in Real Estate. Three credits. Current controversial 
conditions in the field of real estate with concentration on ma- 
jor problems and policies in managing real estate and other re- 
lated resources. 

571 Insurance in Estate Planning. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 
361 or permission of instructor. Insurance as it may relate to 
estate planning examined in detail. Focus on estate planning 
principles including the problems of estate liquidity, taxation, 
governmental regulation, and costs involved in handling estates. 
Also included are ownership provisions and beneficiary desig- 
nations, settlement options, and trusts. 

573 Insurance Company Operations. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
FIN 351 or permission of instructor. Insurance marketing, un- 
derwriting, reinsurance, rate making, claims adjusting, loss con- 
trol activities, and other functions and activities. 

575 Risk Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 361 or per- 
mission of instructor. Analysis of major sources of liability loss 
exposures and the insurance coverages designed to meet those 
exposures. Noninsurance techniques such as loss control and 
risk transfer are also discussed. 



579 Problems in Insurance. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 361 or 

permission of instructor. Application of various insurance cov- 
erages to fulfillment of personal, business, and social needs. 
Special problems are chosen or assigned in areas of the student's 
interest in joint consultation between student and instructor. 

589 Internship in Finance. Three credits. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status and recommendation of advisor. Supervised work experi- 
ence in cooperating business firms or government agencies to- 
gether with specialized academic study relating to the work ex- 
perience. 

599 Problems in Finance. Three credits. Chosen in joint consulta- 
tion between student and instructor. 

600 Survey of Financial Management. Three credits. Principles and 
tools of financial management including time value of money, 
security valuation, funds acquisition and capital budgeting, cost 
of capital, and international environment. May not be used for 
elective credit in graduate business degree programs. 

643 Seminar on Public Finance. Three credits. (Same as ECON 643.) 
Examines the role of government in the allocation and distribu- 
tion of society's resources. Topics include theories of govern- 
ment sector growth, public and quasi-public goods, externali- 
ties and agency theory, transitivity and completeness of voting 
preferences, income redistribution and economic justice, social 
insurance, health care programs, tax shifting and incidence analy- 
sis, efficiency and equity in taxation, and efficiency and redis- 
tributive aspects of deficit financing. Topics may involve case 
studies such as budget formulation, environmental policies, pay- 
roll taxes, and alternative tax structures. 

644 Readings in Finance. One to three credits. Independent read- 
ings-based study of a particular topic in finance selected by the 
student and approved by the instructor. Provides an opportu- 




73 



nity to study special areas of interest for which regular courses 
are not offered. 

Seminar on Monetary Policy. Three credits. (Same as ECON 
645.) Prerequisite: ECON 321 or equivalent recommended. Ob- 
jectives and limitations of monetary policy, alternative monetary 
theories underlying policy decisions and the controversy among 
theories, transmission channels of monetary policy, alternative 
strategies used to achieve the objectives of monetary policy, 
practical considerations in the execution of monetary policy, 
global linkages and monetary policy, and the effects and conse- 
quences of policy decision on economic activity and business 
decisions. 

Seminar on Financial Markets. Three credits. (Same as ECON 
646.) Prerequisite: ECON 321 or equivalent. Credit flows within 
the U.S. and the global economies, the economic and financial 
forces influencing the general level of interest rates and the re- 
lationship among interest rates, the characteristics of key short- 
and long-term financial assets, new financial instruments, de- 
rivative instruments, global financing linkages, global linkages 
among financial instruments and among national economies, 
and interest rate risk, including the measurement and means of 
protection. 

Real Estate Investment. Three credits. Prerequisites: FIN 245 
and 301 . Development of a framework for making real estate 
investment decisions and for analyzing real estate investment 
alternatives. 

Econometrics I. Three credits. (Same as ECON 662.) Prerequi- 
site: ECON 462 or equivalent. Focuses on the use of regression 
analysis in economics. Emphasis on using econometric software 
packages to investigate actual economic problems. A prerequi- 
site for ECON 663. 

Financial Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 301 or 600. 
Theory of corporate finance with applications. Techniques and 
problems for maximizing wealth through the application of dis- 
counted cash flow analysis. Emphasis on risk, capital budgeting, 
and capital structure. 

Cases in Financial Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
FIN 671. Applications-oriented approach to managerial prob- 
lem-solving. Topics may include working capital management, 
capital budgeting, cost of capital estimation, lease/purchase 
decisions, bond refunding, and international issues. 

Seminar on Financial Institutions. Three credits. (Same as 
ECON 673.) Focus on the common and the distinctive aspects 
of the provision of financial services and the management of 
risk associated with those services. Roles, characteristics, and 
operation of financial institutions, constraints that these institu- 
tions face in meeting that objective, regulatory environment 
within which they operate, risks they face and the management 
of those risks, evolution experienced during the 1980s and 
1990s, and the probable course of change in the years ahead. 

Security Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: FIN 381 or con- 
sent of instructor. Interpretation of financial statements, valua- 
tion and selection of securities, security risk, legal and regula- 
tory issues, and agency problems. 

International Financial Management. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: FIN 301 or 600. International capital markets, exchange 
rate exposure, risk management, and other multinational finance 
issues. Essential not only for United States exporters, but also 
for those facing competition from abroad. 



Department of 

Educational 

Leadership 



Nancy C. Keese, Chair 
Jones Hall 323 

The Department of Educational Leadership offers the 
Specialist in Education degree (Ed.S.) and the Master of 
Education degree (M.Ed.) with majors in Administra- 
tion and Supervision and Curriculum and Instruction. 
The Ed.S. in Administration and Supervision offers spe- 
cializations in K-1 2 public schools and higher educa- 
tion. 

The M.Ed, in Administration and Supervision offers a 
concentration in Supervisor of Materials and special- 
izations in K-1 2 public schools and higher education. 
A graduate minor in Library Service is available. 

Normally for admission to the specialist's or master's 
programs, a satisfactory score on the Miller Analogies 
Test or the Graduate Record Examination is required. 
For the M.Ed, in Curriculum and Instruction, an accept- 
able National Teachers Examination score for certified 
teachers may fulfill the admission score requirement. 

Applicants for the Ed.S. and M.Ed, degrees should sub- 
mit a completed application, transcripts, three letters 
of reference, and verification of test scores to the Gradu- 
ate Office. Once the completed file is received in the 
department, an advisor is assigned and the file is re- 
viewed by the Educational Leadership Graduate Ad- 
mission Board. Students should consult an advisor to 
determine what courses to schedule each semester. 

Students pursuing an M.Ed, in Administration and Su- 
pervision or an Ed.S. in Administration and Supervision 
or in Curriculum and Instruction must be admitted to 
the program prior to registration for course work. Stu- 
dents pursuing an M.Ed, in Curriculum and Instruction 
must be admitted to the program prior to the comple- 
tion of 6 hours credit. 



Doctor of Arts Educational Component 

The Doctor of Arts degree is offered by the Departments of 
Chemistry; Economics; English; Health, Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Safety; and History. Requirements are de- 
scribed under the appropriate departmental heading. The 
student should consult with the education advisor to deter- 
mine education course schedules. 



74 Educational Leadership 



Professional Education Core: 

FOED 752 Problems of Evaluation in Higher Education 

FOED 756 Seminar in College Teaching 

SPSE 754 Overview of Higher Education 

SPSE 755 Instructional Development in Higher Education 



Requirements for the Specialist in Education 

Candidate must 

1 . hold a master's degree; 

2. complete a minimum of 30 semester hours with 15 at 
the 700 level; 

3. have teacher licensure. The licensure requirements will 
be waived for the higher education specialization and 
other special circumstances. In the event licensure is 
waived, some prerequisite courses may be required prior 
to full admission into the program. A student seeking a 
licensure waiver must initiate a written request with the 
advisor, seek approval from the chair and dean of edu- 
cation, and forward to the departmental office, Jones Hall 
321. 

4. be admitted by the Educational Leadership Graduate 
Admissions Board prior to registration for coursework; 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 hours; 

6. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination or oral presentation of research project during 
the semester of graduation (exam may be retaken once 
during a subsequent semester). 

Administration and Supervision Major (Ed.S.) 
Specialization: K-12 Public Schools 

This program is not designed to meet licensure requirements. 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

SPSE 720 Administrative Behavior: Theory into Practice 
FOED 706 Seminar in Educational Foundations 
FOED 761 Directed Individual Research in Education 
(Prerequisite: SPSE 70V 

Specialized Core (1 5 semester hours) 

SPSE 701 Educational Research Methodology 

SPSE 702 Administration of School Personnel 

SPSE 704 Seminar in Supervision 

SPSE 705 School Business Management 

SPSE 732 Educational Facilities and Transportation Services 

Electives (6 semester hours) 

To be selected with approval of advisor 

Administration and Supervision Major (Ed.S.) 
Specialization: Higher Education 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

SPSE 720 Administrative Behavior: Theory into Practice 
FOED 706 Seminar in Educational Foundations 
FOED 761 Directed Individual Research in Education 
(Prerequisite: SPSE 70V 

Specialized Core (15 semester hours) 

SPSE 701 Educational Research Methodology 

SPSE 710 The Junior-Community College 

FOED 757 Issues in Higher Education 

Select two courses from the following: 

FOED 752, FOED 756, SPSE 755, SPSE 753, SPSE 721, FOED 758 



Electives (6 semester hours) 

To be selected with approval of advisor 

Curriculum and Instruction Major (Ed.S.) 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

FOED 706 Seminar in Educational Foundations 

FOED 761 Directed Individual Research in Education 

(Prerequisite: SPSE 70V 
SPSE 713 The Curriculum: Structures and Functions 

Specialized Core (12 semester hours) 

SPSE 701 Educational Research Methodology 
SPSE 71 5 Curriculum Study and Instructional Design 
SPSE 716 Practicum in Curriculum Development 
FOED 708 Contributions of Psychology to Education 

Electives (9 semester hours) 

To be selected with approval of advisor 



Requirements for the Master of Education 

Candidate must 

1 . hold a bachelor's degree; 

2. complete 33 semester hours with no more than 30 per- 
cent of the total degree hours dually listed as undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours (Students should refer to the appro- 
priate major for specific requirements.); 

3. have teacher licensure. The licensure requirements will 
be waived for the higher education specialization and 
other special circumstances. In the event licensure is 
waived, some prerequisite courses may be required prior 
to full admission into the program. A student seeking a 
licensure waiver must initiate a written request with the 
advisor, seek approval from the chair and dean of edu- 
cation, and forward to the departmental office, Jones Hall 
321. 

4. be admitted by Educational Leadership Graduate Admis- 
sions Board; 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

6. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination during the semester of graduation (may be re- 
taken once during a subsequent semester). 

Administration and Supervision Major (M.Ed.) 
Specialization: K-12 Public School 
Students must be admitted to the program prior to regis- 
tration for course work. 

Completion of this program will meet course requirements 
for Tennessee administration licensure. Additional state re- 
quirements must be met. Requirements for licensure should 
be checked in the Teacher Licensing Office, McWherter Learn- 
ing Resources Center 1 70. Students who desire administra- 
tion licensure in Tennessee and who transfer credit toward 
the degree from a non-state approved program must have 
competencies verified by the approving authority of the col- 
lege/university from which the credit was earned and ap- 
proved by their advisor. (See department for forms and in- 
structions.) 

Required Courses (33 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations j 

FOED 603 School and Community Relations 



Educational Leadership 75 



FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 601 Organization and Administration of Public Schools 

SPSE 604 Supervision of Instruction 

SPSE 605 Instructional Leadership 

SPSE 61 2 Professional Internship, 9 credits; (may substitute for 

SPSE 604, 660, and either 633 or 638) 

SPSE 633 Elementary and Middle School Principalship OR 

SPSE 638 Secondary School Administration 

SPSE 634 School Finance 

SPSE 639 School Law 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

SPSE 660 Microcomputers in Educational Administration 

Administration and Supervision Major (M.Ed.) 
Specialization: Higher Education 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 608 Studies in Leadership 

Specialized Core (12 semester hours) 

SPSE 653 Administration of Higher Education 

SPSE 660 Microcomputers in Educational Administration 

SPSE 621 Legal Issues in Higher Education 

FOED 658 The College Student 

Electives (12 semester hours) 

To be selected with approval of advisor 

Administration and Supervision Major (M.Ed.) 
Concentration: Supervisor of Materials 

Required Courses (24 semester hours) 
Supervisory Core 

SPSE 604 Supervision of Instruction 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Applications of Educational Research 

Media Core 

LS 515 

LS 516 

LS 617 

LS 696 



Books and Media for Children 

Books and Media for Young People and Adults 

Basic Reference Materials 

Preparation and Utilization of Instruction Materials 



Electives (9 semester hours) 

To be selected with approval of advisor 

Curriculum and Instruction Major (M.Ed.) 

Students must be admitted to the program prior to the 

completion of 6 hours of course work. 

The Curriculum and Instruction program is designed to foster 
the development of teaching skills that result in increased 
pupil performance. By analyzing curriculum choices and strat- 
egies, along with best teaching practices, those who com- 
pfete this program will be better equipped to provide an en- 
vironment in which students engage in relevant and mean- 
ingful learning activities. 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

Specialized Core (18 semester hours) 

YOED 668 Issues and Trends in Teaching and Learning 
SPSE 614 Teacher Leadership for Schoollmprovement 
SPSE 625 Seminar in Curriculum Improvement 



SPSE 645 Elementary and Middle School Curriculum OR 

SPSE 648 Secondary School Curriculum 

SPSE 664 Microcomputers in the K-1 2 Educational Setting 

FOED 663 Educational Tests and Measurement 

Electives (6 semester hours) 

Courses in teaching field with approval of advisor 

Minors 

A minor in Library Service consists of 18 semester hours. A 
minor in Education consists of 12 semester hours selected 
with the consent of the advisor. The Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing and the Master of Science in Teaching degrees require a 
minor in Education to be approved by the minor advisor. 

Courses in Foundations of Education [FOED] 

602 Educational Foundations. Three credits. Assists educational 
personnel in developing contexts and concepts in which educa- 
tional problems and issues may be understood through aware- 
ness of findings in humanistic and behavioral studies. 

603 School and Community Relations. Three credits. The recipro- 
cal relationship of the two and the skills necessary for analyzing 
problems and utilizing data and technical skills in planning ef- 
fective school-community relations programs. 

658/ The College Student. Three credits. The changing nature of the 
758 college student with emphasis on institutional efforts to provide 
for the development of the student. 

661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research. Three cred- 
its. Qualitative and quantitative research applicable to the field 
of education. Both producers and consumers of educational 
research with a literature review presented to support possible 
solutions to significant hypotheses or problems. 

663 Educational Tests and Measurements Three credits. Basic con- 
cepts in educational measurement and evaluation; evaluation 
as a part of the teaching-learning process; utilization of evalua- 
tion for instructional improvement. 

685 Minority Groups. Three credits. Ways the school and commu- 
nity can give greater understanding of and improve the life 
chances of minority group members. 

706 Seminar in Educational Foundations. Three credits. Opportuni- 
ties to think reflectively and critically on the historical, philo- 
sophical, psychological foundations of education and attendant 
implications. 

708 Contributions of Psychology to Education. Three credits. Con- 
cepts and generalizations of the various theories of psychology 
and their relationships to education in such areas as motivation, 
retention, evaluation, discipline, capacity, practice, understand- 
ing, transfer-creative thinking, problem solving, and methods 
of instrurtion. 

752 Problems of Evaluation in Higher Education. Three credits. 
Three semester hours of statistics recommended. Introduction 
to testing theory, design, and construction. Llse of the evalua- 
tion process and instruments; instrurtions, advising, and research 
situations. Required of all Doctor of Arts students. 

756 Seminar in College Teaching. Three credits. Development of 
the student with focus on teaching and learning. Required of all 
Doctor of Arts students. 



76 Educational Leadership 



757 Issues in Higher Education. Three credits. Introduction to higher 
education in America, its historical, philosophical, political, and 
sociological background, development, and relationships. Also 
current trends and problems, particularly those relating to the 
financial and legal aspects. 

761A Directed Individual Educational Research. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: SPSE 701. Culmination of research sequence (FOED 
661 and SPSE 701 ) which requires studying a professional edu- 
cational problem through completing and presenting a research 
project. 

761 B Directed Individual Educational Research. One credit. Pre- 
requisite; FOED 761 A. Completion of the research problem 
begun in FOED 761 A. Students should continue to register for 
FOED 761 B each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

Courses in Youth Education [YOED] 

511 Directed Teaching, Grades 7-12. Twelve credits. Prerequisites: 
All required professional education courses; appropriate spe- 
cial methods course(s); minimum grade point average of 2.50 
overall and in the teaching major including undergraduate study; 
passing scores on the NTE Tests of Communication Skills and 
General Knowledge; admission to teacher education. A full-day 
supervised teaching experience in a public school classroom. 
F^s/Fail grading. 

551 The Teaching Internship, Grades 7-12. Nine credits. Super- 
vised on-the-job student teaching internship. Available only to 
those with at least one year of paid teaching experience in the 
major in which endorsement is sought. Applicant must meet all 
prerequisites for Directed Teaching. 

602 Reading, Writing, and Learning in ESL. Three credits. (Same as 
FL 602.) Provides teaching ideas for promoting oral, reading, 
and writing development in English for K-12 English learners. 
Language acquisition theory, classroom organization, teaching 
strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English learner 
instruction. 

610 Aviation Workshop. Four credits. (Same as AERO 610.) A first 
course in aerospace education; provides an overview of aero- 
space historically and in the future. 

611 International Aerospace Education Seminar A, B, C. Three 
credits each. Acquaints teachers with aerospace implications on 
an international scale. Outstanding international points of in- 
terest in six or more countries visited. Offered in Session IV of 
the summer. 

A. Europe/Mid-East 

B. The Americas 

C. The Far East 

654 Problems in Aerospace Education. One, two, or three credits. 
(Same as AERO 654.) Content varies with needs of individual 
students who are interested in making a specialized study of 
current problems in the field of aerospace education. 

668 Issues and Trends in Teaching and Learning. Three credits. 
Emphasis on examining current issues and trends in teaching 
and learning. 

670 Advanced Aviation Workshop. Four credits. (Same as AERO 
670.) Builds on prior experiences in aviation/aerospace. Essen- 
tial for the prospective teacher of aerospace education courses 
at any level. 



Courses in School Personnel 
Services Education [SPSE] 

521 General Methods Including A/V. Three credits. A general course. 

522 Technology in Teaching. Three credits. Prerequisites: Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education Program and CSC1 1 00 or equivalent. 
Use of selected hardware and software in the teaching/learning 
process. Design and creation of inexpensive teaching and learn- 
ing materials. 

526 A-Z Problems in Education. One, two, or three credits. Oppor- 
tunity for individuals or groups to work on problems related to 
their individual topics. Credit to be determined at the time of 
scheduling. 

600/ Professional Negotiations. Three credits. Concepts and princi- 
700 pals of operating a school district under the master contract. 

Special emphasis on the laws of various slates relative to the 

professional negotiations process. 

601 Organization and Administration of Public Schools. Three 
credits. Basic concepts, principles, and practices in local, state, 
and federal organization and administration of education. 

604 Supervision of Instruction. Three credits. Development and 
purposes of supervision involving principles and techniques for 
organization and facilitation of programs at the school and sys- 
tem level. 

605 Instructional Leadership. Three credits. Research on student 
learning, effective teaching, and effective schools. Attention given 
to processes for promoting school improvement. 

608/ Studies in Leadership. Three credits. Roles, responsibilities, 

708 understandings, and behavior patterns in effective administra- 
tive and supervisory personnel. Developing sensitivity to indi- 
viduals, the nature and structures of groups, and the problems 
of communication within and among groups and individuals. 

609/ Seminar: Conducting Program for School Improvement. Three 

709 credits. Emphasizes motivation, identification of needs and goals, • 
planning and organization, and utilization of various resources 
as components of successful school improvement programs. 

612/ Professional Internship. Nine credits. Requires approval ofi 
712 departmental chair and agreement of superintendent of the^ 
school district. May be substituted for SPSE 604, 660, and ei- 
ther 633 or 638. Educational administration and supervision ex- 
periences learned in the school setting under the supervision of 
a sponsoring mentor. Internship in cooperating school systems. 

614 Teacher Leadership for School Improvement. Three credits. 
Assessing standard teaching practices, analyzing the relationship; 
between effective teaching and effective schools, and develop- 
ing strategies for instructional and school improvement. Includes 
experiences to help students become more reflective in their 
daily teaching. 

621/ Legal Issues in Higher Education. Three credits. The legal frame- 
721 work as it pertains to higher education and its operations. Spe- 
cial attention given to rights of students as well as professors. 
Law cases, constitutional provisions, attorney general's opinions, 
rules and regulations of the Tennessee Board of Regents, Ten- 
nessee Board of Trustees, and the Tennessee Higher Education 
Commission studied and discussed. 



Educational Leadership 77 



Seminar in Curriculum Improvement. Three credits. For the 
advanced major in curriculum development utilizing small group 
or seminar approach. Issues and research in curriculum improve- 
ment analyzed critically. 

Supervising Student Teachers. Three credits. Administration and 
supervision of student teaching. 

Elementary and Middle School Principalship. Three credits. 
The organization and administration of elementary and middle 
schools with emphasis on current practices, trends, and prob- 
lems. 

School Finance. Three credits. State, local, and federal financ- 
ing of education; includes taxation trends, school funds, and 
apportionment; evaluation of equalization plans; state bond loan 
programs; development and administration of school budgets; 
education and economy. 

Secondary School Administration. Three credits. Organization 
and administration of the modern high school with emphasis 
on current practices and problems. 

School Law. Three credits. Legal framework within which pub- 
lic schools operate. Special attention given to the legal rights 
and liabilities of school personnel and school board members. 
School laws, case laws, constitutional provisions, attorneys' gen- 
eral rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education 
emphasized. 

Introduction to Curriculum Development. Three credits. Op- 
portunity to study, discuss, and evaluate modern practices and 
procedures in curriculum development and reorganization in 
schools and school systems. 

Elementary and Middle School Curriculum. Three credits. Con- 
cepts, processes, and skills related to curriculum development 
and evaluation. 

Instructional Excellence in Secondary Schools. Three credits. 
Development of creative approaches for secondary classroom 
teaching in order to stimulate creative and critical thinking abili- 
ties of students. 

Studies in Education: Administration. One, two, or three cred- 
its. Individual or small group study and/or research in educa- 
tional administration which provides an opportunity for in-depth 
study and specialization for majors. To be structured for student 
needs by teacher. Repeatable up to six hours. 

Studies in Education: Curriculum. One, two, or three credits. 
Individual or small group study and/or research in the area of 
curriculum development. To be structured for student needs by 
teacher. Repeatable up to six hours. 

Administration of Higher Education. Three credits. Complex- 
ity of the structure of higher education (national, regional, state, 
and local) and how it is organized. Attention given to the inter- 
relationships of the institution and its internal and external con- 
stituencies. 

Supervised Field Experience. Three credits. Direct field experi- 
ence in appropriate areas of school operation which will meet 
specific needs related to such individual matters as career plan, 
position changes (principals, supervisors, superintendents, cur- 
riculum directors, etc.), or needed competencies. 



656/ 
756 



659/ 
759 



660 



664 



670 



690 



691 



692 



696 



701 



Studies in Education: Supervision. One, two, or three credits. 
Individual or small group study and/or research in the area of 
supervision of instruction. To be based on individual needs and 
structured by teacher. Repeatable up to six hours. 

Independent Study in Higher Education. One, two, or three 
credits. A practicum in higher education. Course will vary to 
meet the needs of individual students who are interested in 
making a specialized study of current problems in the field of 
higher education. 

Microcomputers in Educational Administration. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: SPSE 322 or equivalent. Offers preparation for 
incorporating microcomputer technology into the school work- 
place. Student designs a model school administrative unit by 
applying the microcomputer skills and understanding acquired. 

Microcomputers in the K-12 Educational Setting. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: SPSE 322 or equivalent. Offers preparation for 
incorporating microcomputer technology into the K-12 school 
environment. Student designs a computer-assisted instruction 
project by applying the microcomputer skills and understand- 
ing acquired. 

Practicum in English as Second Language for Grades 9-12. 

One credit. A practicum course for the ESL teacher. Includes 
ten hours field experience in the ESL classroom with 9-1 2 stu- 
dents from different cultures. 

Learning Systems and Instructional Design. Three credits. As- 
sessment of effectiveness and efficiency of various learning sys- 
tems and learning modules. Stresses need for systematic ap- 
proaches to instruction. Gives practice in stating behavioral ob- 
jectives, motivation, adaptation, evaluation, and systems assess- 
ment in which media are utilized as integral parts of learning 
modules. 

Problems in Learning Resources. Three credits. Consideration 
of recent developments in curriculum, teaching, physical facili- 
ties, and innovations in library service and media utilization. 
Includes participation in projects such as media and materials 
for handicapped, educational TV, library skills, graphic com- 
munication, library activities for specific subjects or groups, and 
individualization of instruction. 

Automation of Library Processes. Three credits. Application of 
data processing and computerization techniques to acquisitions, 
cataloging, circulation, and business operations of libraries and 
media centers. Includes an examination of newer developments 
such as MARC, facsimile transmission, and automated retrieval 
of data. Basic technical courses recommended prior to taking 
this course. 

Preparation and Utilization of Instructional Materials. Three 
credits. (Same as L S 696.) Discussion and examination of teach- 
ing aids. 

Educational Research Methodology. Three credits. Designing 
research studies, including development of understandings, as 
well as skills and techniques, needed in gathering, structuring, 
interpreting, and presenting data required for educational re- 
search. Prerequisite for enrollment in FOED 761. 

Administration of School Personnel. Three credits. School dis- 
trict personnel problems. Consideration by school administra- 
tors of relationship between the school and the community with 
special reference to the administrative role. 



78 Educational Leadership 



704 Seminar in Supervision. Three credits. Identification and inves- 
tigation of the problems of supervision and research; experi- 
mentation in the use of supervisory techniques. 

705 School Business Management. Three credits. Reading, discus- 
sion, and problem solving in the field of business administra- 
tion. 

710 The Junior-Community College. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
Open only to doctoral candidates. History, philosophy, organi- 
zation, administration, current developments, and problems in 
tvi^o-year colleges. 

71 1 Readings in Educational Administration. Three credits. Review 
of the research literature on the social and political processes 
involved in the development and implementation of public 
policy and legislation relating to education at the national, state, 
and local levels. 

713 The Curriculum: Structures and Functions. Three credits. 
Scope, sequence, organization, and priorities involved in the 
development of "continuity of educational experience" from 
kindergarten through grades 13-14. 

715 Curriculum Study and Instructional Design. Three credits. 
Readings in current research relative to basic and emerging ideas 
of curriculum development and instructional design. 

716 Practicum in Curriculum Development. Three credits. Princi- 
ples and practices of curriculum construction applied through 
simulated and field experiences. 

720 Administrative Behavior: Theory into Practice. Three credits. 
An exploration of the relevant new developments in the field of 
educational administration, including recent concepts and re- 
search. 

732 Educational Facilities and Transportation Services. Three cred- 
its. Development of competencies in the areas of school plant 
planning, maintenance and utilization, financing, analysis of 
transportation, survey of school plant, site selection, and educa- 
tional specifications. 

754 Overview of Higher Education. Three credits. Introduction to 
higher education in America. Attention given to its historical, 
philosophical, political, and sociological background, develop- 
ment, and relationships. Includes also current trends and prob- 
lems, particularly those which relate to the financial and legal 
aspects of higher education. Required of all Doctor of Arts stu- 
dents. 

755 Instructional Development in Higher Education. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: FOED 756. Addresses effective college teach- 
ing, instructional strategies, and use of technology in teaching 
at the higher education level. Required of all Doctor of Arts 
students. 



Courses In Library Service [L S] 

515 Books and Media for Children. Three credits. Materials suit- 
able for elementary school children including a study of leisure 
time interests and curricular needs, criteria for evaluating mate- 
rials, and related aids used in their selection. 

516 Books and Media for Young People and Adults. Three credits. 
Basically the same approach as L S 51 5 but adapted to the secon- 
dary school and adult level. 



61 1 School Library Administration. Three credits. Simple methods 
of handling essential routines of a school library, including pur- 
chase of materials, mechanical preparation of books and other 
materials, care and repair of books, weeding and inventory pro- 
cedures. 

612 Classification and Cataloging Media and Materials. Three cred- 
its. A continuation of 611, including simplified procedures for 
classifying books and audio-visual materials, cataloging routines, 
and filing. 

613 Principles of Librarianship. Three credits. Presents the broad 
field of library service and librarianship as a profession. Empha- 
sis on the place of the library in the instructional program of the 
school and on administrative details. 

617 Basic Reference Materials. Three credits. Evaluation and use 
of basic reference materials such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, 
atlases, handboob, indexes, and pamphlets. 

61 8 Library Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisite: 1 2 semester hours 
of library service courses. Provides an opportunity to observe 
successful materials specialists/librarians at work and to partici- 
pate in actual operations followed by seminar opportunities for 
exchange of ideas. 

696 Preparation and Utilization of Instructional Materials. Three 
credits. (Same as SPSE 696.) Discussion and examination of 
teaching aids. 




79 



Department of 
Elementary and 
Special Education 



Race Bergman, Interim Chair 
Jones Hall 225 

The Department of Elementary and Special Education 
offers the Master of Education degree with majors in 
Curriculum and Instruction, Reading, and Special Edu- 
cation as well as graduate minors in Curriculum and 
Instruction, Reading, and Special Education. The ma- 
jor in Curriculum and Instruction offers concentrations 
in Early Childhood Education, Elementary School Edu- 
cation, and Middle School Education. Concentrations 
in Mildly/Moderately Disabled Students, Preschool Dis- 
abled Students, Severely/Profoundly Disabled Students, 
and Vision Disabilities are available through the Special 
Education major. The Specialist in Education degree is 
offered with a major in Curriculum and Instruction and 
concentration in Elementary Education. 

Students seeking admission to the Master of Education 
program are expected to score at least 30 on the Miller 
Analogies Test or 700 on the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation or the minimum on a National Teachers Exami- 
nation that meets Tennessee licensure standards. For 
admission to the specialist's program, a score of 800 on 
the Graduate Record Examination is expected. 

Applicants for the Ed.S. and M.Ed, degrees in Curricu- 
lum and Instruction must have elementary teaching li- 
censure, the attainment of which may require additional 
undergraduate courses prior to the completion of the 
degree. 

Requirements for the Specialist in Education 

in order to be admitted the candidate must 

1 . hold a master's degree; 

2. have a minimum of three years teaching experience in 
an elementary setting; 

3. have an initial conference with a graduate advisor in the 
department. 

In order to complete the degree, the candidate must 

1. complete a minimum of 30 semester hours; 

2. file a candidacy form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

3. successfully complete a thesis pertaining to an area of 
emphasis within the scope of elementary education; 

4. successfully complete an oral defense and a comprehen- 
sive examination (may be taken no more than twice). 



Curriculum and Instruction Major (Ed.S.) 
Concentration: Elementary Education 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

SPSE 701 Educational Research Methodology 
FOED 706 Seminar in Educational Foundations 
SPSE 713 The Curriculum: Structures and Functions 

Specialized Courses (15 semester hours) 

FOED 708 Contributions of Psychology to Education 

ELED 629/ 729 Inquiry in the Classroom 

ELED 722 Seminar in Elementary Education 

ELED 725 From Policy to Practice in American Public Schools 

ELED 728 Thesis: Elementary Education 

Elective Courses (6 semester hours) 

To be selected with the consent of the advisor 

Applicants having previously met any of the course require- 
ments above may, with the consent of the advisor, choose 
options. Requirements for licensure should be checked in 
the Teacher Licensing Office, McWherter Learning Resources 
Center 1 70. 



Requirements for the Master of Education 

In order to be admitted the candidate must 

1 . have completed undergraduate prerequisites; 

2. hold a current teaching license; 

3. have an initial conference with an appropriate graduate 
advisor in the department; 

4. have at least 2.75 undergraduate CPA for full admission 
and a 2.50 undergraduate CPA for conditional admis- 
sion. 

In order to complete the degree, the candidate must 

1 . complete a minimum of 33 semester hours with no more 
than 30 percent of the total degree hours dually listed as 
undergraduate/graduate hours; 

2. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 1 5 credit hours; 

3. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination to be taken in the last semester of coursework 
(may be taken no more than twice). 

Curriculum and Instruction Major (M.Ed.) 
Concentration: Early Childhood Education 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

Specialized Core (12 semester hours) 

ELED 601a The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 

(prerequisite for all ELED courses) 
ELED 601b The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 

(must be taken in last semester of coursework) 
ELED 609 Creating Learning Environments for Young Children 
ELED 620 The Classroom as Community 
ELED 662 Assessment of Teaching and Learning 

Specialized Courses (6 semester hours) 

READ 612 Issues and Trends in Reading Instruction 
READ 672 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading Practices 
READ 676 Reading Instruction in Early Childhood Education 
ELED 600 Teaching Writing 



80 Elementary and Special Education 



ELED 603 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education 

ELED 61 3 Current Issues in Elementary Language Arts 

ELED 614 Current Issues in Elementary Social Studies 

ELED 61 7 The Multi-Age Classroom 

ELED 618 Current Issues in Elementary Mathematics 

ELED 619 Current Issues in Elementary Science 

ELED 621 Seminar on Current Innovations and Trends in 

Elementary Education 

ELED 622 Seminar in Early Childhood Education 

ELED 623 Integrated Curriculum, K-4 

ELED 625 Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning 

ELED 630 Play Education and the Curriculum 

ELED 631 Play Education and Social-Emotional Learning 

ELED 632 Play Education and Literacy 

ELED 640 Teaching the Special Needs Learner in the Heterogenous 

Classroom 

Electlves (6 hours) 

To be selected within the range of specialized courses or with the con- 
sent of the advisor. 



Concentration: Elementary School Education 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

Specialized Core (12 semester hours) 

ELED 601a The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 

(prerequisite for all ELED courses) 
ELED 601b The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 

(must be taken in last semester of coursework) 
ELED 609 Creating Learning Environments for Young Children OR 
ELED 610 The Early Adolescent Learner 
ELED 620 The Classroom as Community 
ELED 662 Assessment of Teaching and Learning 

Special 

READ 
READ 
READ 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 

ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 
ELED 



zed Courses (6 semester hours) 

61 2 Issues and Trends in Reading Instruction 
672 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading Practices 
676 Reading Instruction in Early Childhood Education 
600 Teaching Writing 
603 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education 

61 3 Current Issues in Elementary Language Arts 

614 Current Issues in Elementary Social Studies 

61 7 The Multi-Age classroom 

618 Current Issues in Elementary Mathematics 

619 Current Issues in Elementary Science 

621 Seminar on Current Innovations and Trends in 
Elementary Education 

622 Seminar in Early Childhood Education 

623 Integrated Curriculum, K-4 

624 Interdisciplinary Teaching, 5-8 

625 Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning 

630 Play Education and the Curriculum 

631 Play Education and Social-Emotional Learning 

632 Play Education and Literacy 
640 Teaching the Special Needs Learner in the 

Heterogeneous Classroom 



Electives (6 semester hours) 

To be selected within the range of specialized courses or with the con- 
sent of the advisor. 

Concentration: Middle School Education 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

FOED 602 Educational Foundations 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 



Specialized Core (12 semester hours) 

ELED 601a The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 
(prerequisite for all ELED courses) 

601 b The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner 

(must be taken in last semester of coursework) 

610 The Early Adolescent Learner 

620 The Classroom as Community 

662 Assessment of Teaching and Learning 



ELED 

ELED 
ELED 
ELED 

Specialized 

READ 612 

READ 672 

READ 676 

ELED 600 

ELED 603 

ELED 613 

ELED 614 

ELED 617 

ELED 618 

ELED 619 

ELED 621 

ELED 624 

ELED 625 

ELED 630 

ELED 631 

ELED 632 

ELED 640 



Courses (6 semester hours) 

Issues and Trends in Reading Instruction 

Diagnostic and Remedial Reading Practices 

Reading Instruction in Early Childhood Education 

Teaching Writing 

History and Theory of Early Childhood Education 

Current Issues in Elementary Language Arts 

Current Issues in Elementary Social Studies 

The Multi-Age Classroom 

Current Issues in Elementary Mathematics 

Current Issues in Elementary Science 

Seminar on Current Innovations and Trends in 

Elementary Education 

Interdisciplinary Teaching, 5-8 

Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning 

Play Education and the Curriculum 

Play Education and Social-Emotional Learning 

Play Education and Literacy 

Teaching the Special Needs Learner in the 

Heterogenous Classroom 



Electives 

To be selected within the range of specialized courses or with the con- 
sent of the advisor. 

Minor in Curriculum and Instruction 

Students desiring a graduate minor in Curriculum and In- 
struction in either of the three concentrations described 
above — Early Childhood, Elementary School Education, or 
Middle School Education — should complete 18 semester 
hours in elementary education to include ELED 609 or 610, 
620, and 662. This does not meet licensure requirements 
in elementary education. 

Reading Major (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education degree with a major in reading re- 
quires the completion of a minimum of thirty-three (33) se- 
mester hours. READ 425/525, Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Reading, or an equivalent course in elementary read- 
ing methods, is a prerequisite for graduate study in reading. 

Required Core (21-28 semester hours)* 

READ 61 2 Issues and Trends in Reading Instruction 
READ 672 Diagnostic and Remedial Practices in the Improvement 
of Reading (Prerequisites: READ 61 2 and FOED 663 or 
PSY 526 or ELED 662 and PSY 61 2 or 61 3 or their 
equivalents) 

Research Seminar in Reading (Prerequisite: READ 61 2, 
its equivalent, or permission of the instructor) 
The Reading Practicum (Prerequisite: READ 672 or 
its equivalent) 

Analysis and Application of Educational Research 
Educational Tests and Measurements OR 
Introduction to Psychological Testing OR 
Evaluation in the Elementary School 
Developmental Psychology: Child OR 
Developmental Psychology: Adolescent (or 
their equivalent) 



READ 675 



READ 679 



FOED 


661 


FOED 


663 


PSY 


526 


ELED 


662 


PSY 


612 


PSY 


613 



Elementary and Special Education 81 



Special Education Options (3 semester hours) 

To be selected with consent of advisor 

Electlves (9 semester hours) 

To be selected with consent of advisor 

•27 hours if READ 425/525 and READ 413/513 completed as part of a 
previous degree or taken prior to application for admission in this pro- 
gram 

Minor in Reading 

A minor is available in Reading, the content of which is de- 
termined through collaborative consultation with the student's 
major advisor and the advisor for reading. 

Special Education Major (M.Ed.) 

Concentration: Mildly/Moderately Disabled Students 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

SPED 678 Issues in Special Education 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

Elective in Research Methodology 

Concentration Courses (15 semester hours) 

SPED 630 Theoretical Perspectives on Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPED 631 Issues in Assessment of Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPED 633 Theories of Instruction for Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPED 637 Mildly/Moderately Disabled Adolescents and Adults 
SPED 638 Collaborative/Consulting Skills in Special Education 

Restricted Electives (9 semester hours) 

To be selected with consent of advisor 

Concentration: Preschool Disabled Students 

Required Core (3 semester hours) 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

Concentration Courses (15 semester hours) 

SPED 690 
SPED 691 
SPED 692 
SPED 693 



SPED 695 



Characteristics of Preschool Children with Disabilities 

Developmental Assessment 

Laboratory Experience I 

Methods of Working with Children Who Are 

Developmentally Delayed 

Laboratory Experience II 



Restricted Electives (1 5 semester hours) 

To be selected with consent of advisor 

Concentration: Severely/Profoundly 
Disabled Students 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

SPED 678 Issues in Special Education 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

Elective in research methodology 

Concentration Courses (15 semester hours) 

SPED 638 Collaborative/Consulting Skills in Special Education 
SPED 640 Characteristics and Needs of Severely/Profoundly 

Disabled 
SPED 643 Theories of Instruction for Severely/Profoundly 

Disabled Students 
SPED 691 Developmental Assessment 
CDFS 630 Application of Child Development Principles I 

Restricted Electives (9 semester hours) 

To be selected with consent of advisor 



Concentration: Vision Disabilities 

Required Core (9 semester hours) 

SPED 638 Collaborative/Consulting Skills in Special Education 

SPED 678 Issues in Special Education 

FOED 661 Analysis and Application of Educational Research 

Concentration Courses (24 semester hours) 

SPED 650 Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye 

SPED 651 Introduction to Braille and Communication Skills 

for the Visually Impaired 
SPED 652 Advanced Braille and Communication Skills 

for the Visually Impaired 
SPED 653 Educational Procedures for the Visually Impaired 
SPED 654 Advanced Educational Procedures 

for the Visually Impaired 
SPED 655 Orientation and Mobility for the Classroom Teacher 
SPED 656 Nature and Needs of the Visually Impaired 
SPED 657 Practicum in Special Education (Vision) OR 
SPED 551 Teaching Internship: Special Education 



Minor in Special Education 

Students desiring a minor at the graduate level in Special 
Education must complete 1 8 semester hours in Special Edu- 
cation to include SPED 620, 680, and 12 additional semes- 
ter hours of 600 courses in Special Education. This does not 
meet licensure requirements in Special Education. 

Courses in Elementary Education [ELED] 

505 Effective Instruction (K-4). Three credits. A comprehensive ex- 
ploration of the strategies used to teach children in the early 
elementary grades. Practicum experiences required. 

507 Effective Instruction (5-8). Three credits. A comprehensive ex- 
ploration of strategies used to teach children in the upper el- 
ementary and middle grades. Practicum experiences required. 

51 1 A Directed Teaching Grades K-8. Twelve credits. Prerequisites to 
enrollment in the course include FOED 111, 211; ELED 311 A, 
31 ID, 325 or 327, 405 or 407; READ 425; SPED 301; senior 
standing; minimum grade point average of 2.50 overall and in 
the major; admission to Teacher Education program; passing 
scores on the NTE Tests of Communication Skills and Cieneral 
Knowledge. Fulltime, 1 5-week semester of supervised teaching 
experience in the public schools. Pass/Fail. 

520 Observation and Participation. Three credits. Directed labora- 
tory experiences for teachers desiring to add an endorsement to 
their certificates. Includes language arts, math, science, social 
studies, art, and music. 

A. Kindergarten 

B. Grades 1-6 

522 Environmental Education for the Elementary Teacher. Three 
credits. An investigation of conservation, preservation, ecology, 
and resource management for the education major. 

526 A-Z Problems in Elementary Education. One-three credits. A 
problem-oriented course, on or off campus, planned and de- 
signed for individuals, school faculty, school system, or other 
professional groups which will provide opportunities for in- 
service education related to assessed needs. Credit toward a 
degree limited to six semester hours. 

529 The Curriculum of Early Childhood Education. Three credits. 
Experiences designed to aid kindergarten and primary teachers 



82 Elementary and Special Education 



in developing readiness for the creative capacities of children in 
several curricular areas. 

530 The Kindergarten Program. Three credits. Philosophy, meth- 
ods, materials, and acceptable standards involved in the organi- 
zation and instruction procedures of a kindergarten program. A 
one-hour laboratory period per week required in addition to 
class periods. 

531 Kindergarten Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisite: ELED 530 
or special permission from an advisor in early childhood educa- 
tion. Observation and participation in kindergarten instruction 
and activities. Laboratory work of 1 60 hours is assigned in addi- 
tion to a weekly seminar. 

545 Teaching in the Upper Elementary and Middle School. Three 
credits. Survey course emphasizing the needs of the learner and 
the methods, materials, techniques, and evaluative procedures 
appropriate for the student at this level. Appropriate laboratory 
experiences included. 

551 The Teaching Internship, Grades 1-8. Nine credits. A super- 
vised internship available only to those with at least one year of 
paid teaching experience in the major in which endorsement is 
sought. Applicants must meet all prerequisites for student teach- 
ing. 

600 TeachingWrltlng. Three credits. An in-depth exploration of stu- 
dents' efforts to become writers. Presents theoretical and prac- 
tical strategies for establishing an effective writing environment 
based on current research. 

601 a The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner. Two credits. Articulates 

the role of and explores the varied dimensions of the process of 
reflective teaching as it may be utilized by the elementary, spe- 
cial education, reading, or secondary teacher. Prerequisite for 
all Curriculum and Instruction (Early Childhood Education, 
Elementary School Education, and Middle School Education) 
candidates. 

601b The Teacher as Reflective Practitioner. One credit. A culmi- 
nating course summarizing and synthesizing the knowledge ac- 
quired throughout the graduate program. Must be taken In last 
semester of graduate work. 

603 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education. Three cred- 
its. Emphasis on the emerging theories which have influenced 
current programs. 

609 Creating Learning Environments for Young Children. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: ELED 601a. In-depth analysis of social, 
emotional, language, and cognitive variables which impact young 
children's learning and allow teachers to plan and maintain pro- 
active environments. Required for those students wishing to 
concentrate in Early Childhood Education. 

610 The Early Adolescent Learner. Three credits. Prerequisite: ELED 
601a. Reflects on the early adolescent while focusing on the 
student-centered school environment and the appropriately well 
balance curriculum. Required for those students wishing to con- 
centrate in Middle School Education. 

61 3 Current Issues In Elementary Language Arts. One credit. Pre- 
requisite: 601a. Overview of current issues surrounding the 
teaching of language arts. 

614 Current Issues in Elementary Social Studies. One credit. Pre- 
requisite: ELED 601a. Overview of current issues and trends 
surrounding the teaching of social studies. Topics will vary from 
semester to semester. 



617 



618 



619 



620 



621 



622 



624 



625 



629/ 
729 



630 



631 



632 



640 



The Multi-Age Classroom. One credit. Prerequisite: ELED 601 a. 
Examines the basic alternatives and tools that have been shown 
to be effective in multi-age classrooms in both primary and 
middle grades. 

Current Issues in Elementary Mathematics. One credit. Pre- 
requisite: ELED 601a. Overview of current issues and trends 
surrounding the teaching of mathematics. Topics will vary from 
semester to semester. 

Current Issues in Elementary Science. One credit. Prerequi- 
site: ELED 601 a. Investigates current issues relating to the study 
and teaching of elementary school science. Topics will vary from 
semester to semester. 

The Classroom as Community. Three credits. Prerequisite: | 
ELED 601 a. Explores the classroom community with respect to 
definitions and practice. Teachers will reflect on how their be- 
liefs and attitudes influence practice. Required for all students. 

Seminar on Current Innovations and Trends in Elementary 
Education. Three credits. Prerequisite: ELED 601a. Recent re- 
search in child development, school organization, curriculum, 
and evaluation. 

Seminar in Early Childhood Education. Three credits. Review 
of issues, programs, and research in early childhood education. 

Integrated Curriculum, K-4. Three credits. Prerequisite: ELED 
601a. Helps develop the skills needed for organizing an inte- 
grated program, for teaching within an integrated program, and 
for assessing children's progress in ways appropriate to an inte- 
grated program. 

Interdisciplinary Teaching, 5-8. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
ELED 601a. Assists the elementary and middle school teacher 
in organizing, assessing, and teaching in an interdisciplinary pro- 
gram. 

Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: ELED 601a. Learning environments supported by 
computer technology which promote knowledge construction. 
Special emphasis on use of the Internet and the design and de- 
velopment of a hypermedia learning environment. 

Inquiry In the Classroom. Three credits. An in-depth study of 
the inquiry process as it relates to teachers in the classroom. 
Theory and practice combine as teachers engage in their own 
research to improve classroom instruction. 

Play Education and the Curriculum. One credit. Prerequisite: 
ELED 601a. Articulates the role of play for children's cognitive 
learning. A theoretical analysis will facilitate early childhood, 
elementary, and special educator's ability to design quality play 
experiences which promote children's learning. 

Play Education and Social-Emotional Learning. One credit 
Prerequisite: ELED 601a. Promotes elementary and special edu- 
cation teachers' abilities to plan and implement quality play ex- 
periences which promote children's social and emotional learn- 
ing. 

Play Education and Literacy. One credit. Prerequisite: ELED 
601 a. Relationship between play and literacy development high- 
lighted. Course content will enable teachers to plan for play 
experiences which promote children's abilities to read, write, 
listen, and speak. 

Teaching the Special Needs Learner In the Heterogeneous 
Classroom. Three credits. Prerequisite: ELED 601a (prerequi- 



Elementary and Special Education 83 



662 



570 



site requirement for elementary education majors only). Helps 
develop skills, beliefs, and attitudes necessary for effectively in- 
corporating and teaching special needs learners in a heteroge- 
neous classroom. 

Assessment of Teaching and Learning. Three credits. Familiar- 
izes teachers with assessment techniques that focus on the com- 
plex relationship between learning and instruction. Required 
for all students. 

Practicum in English as a Second Language (4-8). One credit. 
A practicum course for the ESL teacher. Includes ten hours field 
experience in the ESL classroom with five to eight students from 
different cultures. 



587 Home-School Interaction. Three credits. Includes approaches, 
activities, and materials related to parent education. 

722 Seminar in Elementary Education. Three credits. Explores con- 
temporary issues in education as they relate to the individual 
teacher, the school as an institution, the school clientele, and 
the community. Allows the student to adjust individual educa- 
tional philosophy to a changing society and schools; gives con- 
tiguity to other educational experiences. 



725 



From Policy to Practice in American Public Schools. Three cred- 
its. The effect of public policy on educational practices. Empha- 
sis on exploring policy variations within the educational prac- 
tices in the U.S. and around the world with a particular empha- 
sis on elementary education. 

726 A-Z Problems in Elementary Education. One to six credits. Pre- 
requisite: Nine semester hours of graduate-level courses in el- 
ementary education. 



728 



Thesis: Elementary Education. Three to six credits. Prerequi- 
site: Six semester hours of 700-level courses in elementary edu- 
cation. Supervised, in-depth study, on an individual or group 
basis, of an area of elementary education. Student may register 
two semesters for three hours credit each semester or for six 
hours credit one semester. Open only to post-master's degree 
students. 



Courses in Reading [READ] 



513 



525 



546 



612 



Corrective Reading in the Elementary School. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: READ 525 or equivalent. The modification of as- 
sessment and instruction for the resolution of reading problems 
in the elementary classroom. 

Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Reading. Four cred- 
its. Prerequisite: ELED 31 1 A or permission of advisor. Methods 
and materials for teaching reading in the elementary and/or spe- 
cial education classroom. Laboratory experiences provided. 

Teaching Reading in the Content Area. Three credits. Empha- 
sis on teaching reading in content subjects such as mathemat- 
ics, science, and social studies in upper elementary, middle 
school, and secondary schools. Specific suggestions for activi- 
ties and lesson strategies included. (Available on permission-of- 
department basis only.) 

Issues and Trends in Reading Instruction. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: READ 425 or 334 or equivalent. Extends the teacher's 
knowledge and ability in planning and developing a reading 
program through extensive reading in the field and seminar par- 
ticipation. Special emphasis on current trends in reading instruc- 
tion. (Available on permission-of-department basis only) 



671 Teaching Reading in High School. Three credits. The role of 
reading in middle and secondary school programs and the read- 
ing needs of high school students discussed. Suggestions for 
meeting the reading needs of students, along with simulated 
and direct laboratory experiences, are included. Students desir- 
ing secondary teaching licensure in language arts must take one 
additional semester hour in reading methodology. 

672 Diagnostic and Remedial Practices in the Improvement of 
Reading. Three credits. Prerequisites: READ 61 2 and FOED 663 
or PSY 526 or ELED 662 and PSY 61 2 or 61 3 or their equiva- 
lents. Formal and informal tools to document and define a read- 
ing difficulty as well as of approaches/strategies to overcome 
such difficulties. (Available on permission-of-department basis 
only) 

673 Curriculum and Supervisory Problems in Reading. Three cred- 
its. Developmental sequence of reading skills, pre-K to adult. 
Discusses the role of a reading specialist, in-service education, 
grants, critiquing materials, and the substance of school reading 
programs. 

675 Research Seminar in Reading. Three credits. Prerequisite: READ 
612, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor. An investiga- 
tion of significant research related to reading with emphasis on 
classroom practices, group analysis, and individual study. (Avail- 
able on permission-of-department basis only.) 

676 Reading Instruction in Early Childhood Education. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: READ 525 or equivalent. A methods course 
which concentrates on beginning reading and emergent literacy 
issues in developing reading and writing. 

679 The Reading Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisites: READ 672 
or equivalent. Includes practice in teaching students with vari- 
ous types of reading and learning problems. (Available on per- 
mission-of-department basis only.) 

Courses in Special Education [SPED] 

524 Methods and Techniques of Behavior Management. Three 
credits. Overview of various approaches to behavior manage- 
ment. Application of various approaches in different special 
education settings. Basis of evaluation of various behavior change 
techniques. 

526 Problems in Special Education A-Z. One to three credits. A 
problem-oriented course, on or off campus, planned and de- 
signed for individuals, a school faculty, school system, or other 
professional groups which will provide opportunities for pre- or 
in-service education related to assessed needs. Not more than 
6 semester hours credit in independent study (SPED 684) and/ 
or problems (SPED 526) can be applied toward a degree or li- 
censure. 

532 Directed Teaching in Special Education (Self-contained). Nine 
credits. Prerequisites: ELED 31 1 D or ELED 61 8, READ 525; SPED 
620, 680; full admission to Directed Teaching. A full-day super- 
vised teaching experience of ten-weeks duration in a public class- 
room. Pass/Fail. 

535 Directed Teaching in Special Education (Resource room). Nine 
credits. Prerequisites: ELED 31 1 D or ELED 61 8, READ 525; SPED 
620 and 680; full admission to Directed Teaching. A full-day 
supervised teaching experience of ten-weeks duration in a pub- 
lic classroom. Pass/Fail. 



84 Elementary and Special Education 



551 Teaching Internship: Special Education. Nine credits. A super- 
vised teaching experience. Available only to those with at least 
one year of paid teaching experience in the major in which 
endorsement is sought. Applicants must meet all prerequisites 
for student teaching. Pass/Fail. 

602 Overview of Special Education. Three credits. Theories and 
techniques of providing instruction to exceptional individuals. 
Designed for individuals without prior specialized experience 
and/or course work in special education. Not for degree credit. 

620 Educational Diagnostics. Three credits. The role of the special 
educator in the assessment process; formal and informal assess- 
ment devices and procedures; involvement of parents In the 
evaluation; precision teaching; diagnostic and prescriptive teach- 
ing; writing lEPs. 

627 Characteristics and Needs of the Mentally Retarded Child. 

Three credits. Includes the mentally retarded's cognitive, affec- 
tive, motor, social, and language development. 

628 Characteristics and Needs of the Emotionally Disabled Child. 

Three credits. A survey of theories and research relative to emo- 
tional/behavioral problems of children; discussion of classroom 
models for remediation and specific techniques appropriate for 
teacher use. 

630 Theoretical Perspectives on Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Three 
credits. Reviews the various perspectives on mild/moderate dis- 
abling conditions from a historical perspective. Viability of each 
perspective examined. Implications of each for assessment and 
intervention considered. 

631 Issues in Assessment of Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: SPED 630. Contexts a variety of tests and 
assessment tools within the various theoretical frameworks they 
represent. Considers the development of diagnostic batteries based 
on such tests. Particular attention given to the significance of the 
theoretical f)erspectives in selectingand interpreting data collected. 

633 Theories of Instruction for Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: SPED 631. Contexts a variety of Instruc- 
tional approaches within the various theoretical frameworks from 
which each evolved. Considers the development and evaluation 
of lEPs through an integration of learner characteristics. Instruc- 
tional approaches, and educational needs. 

637 Mildly/Moderately Disabled Adolescents and Adults. Three 
credits. The unique status of public school students, ages 16-21 
years with mild/moderate disabilities. Focus on career, vocational, 
and transitional services. Highlights specific concerns and prob- 
lems in adulthood. 

638 Collaborative/Consulting Skills in Special Education. Three 
credits. Assistance in developing skills needed for consulting with 
parents, students, teachers, administrators, and others in the de- 
velopment and implementation of individualized education 
programs for disabled students. 

640 Characteristics and Needs of Severely/Profoundly Disabled. 

Three credits. In-depth survey of severely/profoundly disabled 
students and their needs. Emphasis on cognitive, motor, social, 
communicative, behavioral, and physical characteristics of this 
population. 

643 Theories of Instruction for Severely/Profoundly Disabled Stu- 
dents. Three credits. Advanced methods and techniques for 
teaching severely/profoundly disabled students. 



650 Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye. Three credits. Examines' 
structures of the eye and visual system and diseases/conditions i 
that affect vision. Considers various screening instruments to use : 
for making referrals to eye specialists. Attention given to admin- 
istration and Interpretation of screening instruments. 

651 introduction to Braille and Communication Skills for the Vi- 
sually Impaired. Three credits. Offers teachers and profession- 
als who work with visually impaired and blind students skills 
and competencies in reading and writing braille. 

652 Advanced Braille and Communication Skills for the Visually 
Impaired. Three credits. Prerequisite: SPED 651 . Reinforces and 
extends skills learned in SPED 651. Formatting textbooks and 
trade books required by visually impaired students in schools. 
Emphasis placed on learning to use abacus, slate and stylus, and 
correction slate. Transcription according to Library of Congress 
standards. 

653 Educational Procedures for the Visually Impaired. Three cred- 
its. Presents students with roles and responsibilities of the teacher 
of visually impaired, including adaptations of curriculum, envi- 
ronment, equipment, and methods. Available resources at lo- 
cal, state, and national levels. Particular attention given the de- 
cision-making processes required, such as type of reading me- 
dium required for specific tasks, use of low vision aids, appro- 
priateness of various types of modifications, and adaptations of 
regular curriculum. 

654 Advanced Educational Procedures for the Visually Impaired. 

Three credits. Necessary skills to conduct functional vision as- 
sessments of students of normal intelligence as well as those 
with multiple disabilities. Assessing communication skills for the 
visually impaired. 

655 Orientation and Mobility for the Classroom Teacher. Three 
hours. Basic orientation and mobility techniques to teach visu- 
ally impaired students to enable them to move around the school 
environment safely. Included are concept development, pro- 
tective techniques, basic and advanced sighted guide techniques, 
and the use of tactual maps. 

656 Nature and Needs of the Visually Impaired. Three credits. In- 
sights into problems associated with visual loss and its impact 
on individuals, family relations, and seeing populations. Also 
addresses advantages and limitations of adaptations and spe- 
cialized instruction, equipment, devices, and aids. Examines the 
role and effect of various organizations and professionals on 
services for visually impaired persons. 

657 Practicum in Special Education (Vision). Three credits. Under- 
standing of eye conditions that result in visual disabilities and ' 
their implications; training in determining most appropriate 
modifications. Experiences in assessment of functional vision of 
students with visual disabilities and multiple disabilities; designed 
to facilitate application of these skills in real-life experiences 
with visually impaired and blind learners. 

672 Working with Parents. Three credits. Understanding the con- 
cerns and needs of parents of children who have special needs. 
Also presents strategies and techniques for working effectively 
with parents. 

674 Affective Education in the Classroom. Three credits. Theoreti- 
cal basis for the role of the school in providing instruction in the • 
affective domain. Emphasis on the translation of theories of 
emotional/social development into educational strategies. 



85 



678 Issues in Special Education. Three credits. Analysis of current 
issues in the field. Emphasis on the analysis of relevant research. 

680 Exceptional Children and Youth. Three credits. Introdurtion to 
problems in identification, etiology, and educational treatment 
of mentally retarded, gifted, physically and emotionally chal- 
lenged, learning disabled, and culturally disadvantaged children 
and youth. 

681 Characteristics and Needs of the Learning Disabled Child. 

Three credits. An understanding of the causes and characteris- 
tics. Formal and informal evaluation instruments. An investiga- 
tion of various educational approaches to learning disabilities, 
their theoretical bases, and practical implications. 

684 Independent Study: Special Education. One to six credits. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of the advisor. Enables students to develop 
and conduct a study based on individual professional interests. 
Not more than 6 semester hours credit in Independent Study 
(SPED 684) and/or Problems (SPED 526) can be applied toward 
a degree or licensure. 

685 Characteristics and Needs of the Severely Handicapped Child. 

Three credits. An in-depth survey covering the characteristics 
and needs for serving the severely disabled. Includes how to 
develop a program and the lER 

686 Characteristics and Needs of the Gifted Child. Three credits. 
Characteristics, needs, psychological and educational consider- 
ations, and identification procedure for gifted children. 

687 Habilitation of Mentally Retarded and Multiple Handicapped 

YoungAdults. Three credits. An in-depth look. Various rehabili- 
tation models, how they are designed, and how they function. 

688 Educational Procedures in the Education of the Gifted. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: SPED 686. Reviews various theoretical 
models of learning and teaching which are most often used in 
developing curriculum for the gifted learner. Application of the 
models stressed. 

690 Characteristics of Pre-School Children with Disabilities. Three 
credits. Includes an in-depth study of young children delayed 
in their development. Focus on developmental needs. 

691 Developmental Assessment. Three credits. Evaluative and diag- 
nostic instruments and procedures used with very young and/or 
multiple-disabled individuals. 

692 Laboratory Experience I. Three credits. Practicum experience 
in settings serving pre-school children who have developmental 
delays. Students will spend 60 hours in each of two practicum 
settings. 

693 Methods of Working with Children Who Are Developmen- 
tally Delayed. Three credits. Current theories, practices, and 
procedures used to develop programs for pre-school children 
who are developmentally delayed (ages birth to 5 years). 

695 Laboratory Experience II. Three credits. Practicum experience 
in settings serving pre-school children who have developmental 
delays. Students will spend 60 hours in each of two practicum 
settings. 



Department of 
Engineering 
Technology and 
Industrial Studies 



Jim Lorenz, Chair 

Voorhies Industrial Studies Complex 143 

The Department of Engineering Technology and indus- 
trial Studies offers the Master of Science degree in In- 
dustrial Studies with thesis and non-thesis options and 
concentrations in General, Safety, and Industrial Rela- 
tions. Under the General concentration, the degree re- 
quires the student to select courses, as approved by the 
graduate advisor, that provide the student with a tech- 
nical area of specialty. Currently, typical technical areas 
include manufacturing, environmental safety, computer 
integrated manufacturing, electronics, drafting and de- 
sign, and quality control. Other technical areas can be 
designed to meet the student's individual needs, if ap- 
proved by the graduate advisor. A minor in Industrial 
Studies is also available at the graduate level. 

Normally a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record 
Examination is required for admission to the master's 
program. 

The Department cooperates with the Schools/Depart- 
ments of Agribusiness and Agriscience; Business Edu- 
cation, Marketing Education, and Office Management; 
and Human Sciences to offer the Master of Vocational- 
Technical Education (M.V.T.E.) degree. 

Requirements for the 
Master of Science Degree 

Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have completed undergraduate prerequisites of at least 
18 semester hours in industrial studies or equivalent 
coursework approved by the advisor; 

2. complete at least 30 semester hours, with 21 semester 
hours at the 600 level, to include ETIS 662 and 664 and 
6 semester hours from the following courses: ETIS 602, 
611,618, or 637; 

3 . complete 6 semester hours of an approved research tool 
with grades of C or better on the undergraduate or gradu- 
ate level. Typical research tools include statistics, com- 
puter science programming, or foreign language. 



86 Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 



4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office after the 
completion of 12 graduate credits and prior to the 
completion of 24 credit hours to include ETIS 662, 6 
hours from ETIS 602, 61 1, 618, 637, and 3 hours from 
any industrial studies independent study or advanced 
technical problems course; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice); 

6. complete a major of at least 1 8 hours; 

7. elect whether or not to have a minor. A minor, if elected, 
must include a minimum of 12 semester hours. 

The program may include a cognate of 6 hours in manage- 
ment and marketing, computer science, economics, psychol- 
ogy, or vocational-technical education. 

Non-Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have completed undergraduate prerequisites of at least 
18 semester hours in industrial studies or equivalent 
course work approved by the advisor; 

2. complete at least 36 semester hours with at least 26 se- 
mester hours of 600-level courses to include ETIS 662 
and 651 or 691 and 6 semester hours from the following 
courses: ETIS 602, 611,61 8, or 637; 

3. complete 6 semester hours of an approved research tool 
with grades of C or better on the undergraduate or gradu- 
ate level. Typical research tools include statistics, com- 
puter science programming, or foreign language. 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office after 
completion of 12 graduate credits and prior to the 
completion of 24 credit hours to include ETIS 662, 6 
hours from ETIS 602, 61 1 , 61 8, 637, and 3 hours from 
any industrial studies independent study or advanced 
technical problems course; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice); 

6. complete a major of at least 1 8 hours; 

7. elect whether or not to have a minor. A minor, if elected, 
must include a minimum of 12 semester hours. 

The program may include a cognate of 6 hours in manage- 
ment and marketing, computer science, economics, psychol- 
ogy, or vocational-technical education. 

Concentration: General 

Candidate must complete 

1 . requirements for the thesis or non-thesis option; 

2. core, approved by the advisor, consisting of emphasizing 
in one of the following typical areas: environmental safety, 
computer integrated manufacturing, drafting and design, 
quality control; 

3. approved minor/cognate and/or additional electives as 
approved by the advisor. 

Concentration: Industrial Relations 

Candidate must complete 

1 . requirements for the thesis or non-thesis option; 

2. core consisting of ET 542, 594; ETIS 601 , 662, 664 (the- 
sis option) or 691 (non-thesis); PSY 532; 



3. electives to be selected from ETIS 602, 604, 61 1 , 691 ; 
ECON651. 

Concentration: Safety 

Candidate must complete 

1 . requirements for the thesis or non-thesis option; 

2. core consisting of ETIS 602, 604, 607, 662, and 664 (the- 
sis option) or 691 (non-thesis); 

3. elertives to be selected from SAFE 532, 535, 641, 645, 
647, 692; PHED 665; ET 542, 544, 545, 596, 597; ETIS 
601,611,651,692; PSY 535. 



Courses in Engineering Technology 
and Industrial Studies [ETIS] 

549 Topics in Industrial Technology. One to six credits. Selected 
topics offered as required to meet class needs. 

570 Industrial Topics. One to six credits. Problems in any one of a 
variety of areas to meet class needs. 

579 Shop Problems. Three credits. Prerequisites: Completion of all 
undergraduate courses in a given area and permission of in- 
structor For the advanced student who wishes to work on a 
designated problem in a specific area. Independent work on a 
selected problem or project under the instructor's guidance. 

599 Introduction to Operations Research. Three credits. Problem 
solving in research and development involving operations re- 
search models, computer applications, and industrial problems. 

601 Safety Planning. Three credits. Advanced study of planning In 
occupational safety and health management, including program 
planning and development methods and techniques, as well as 
various systems approaches to hazard control 

602 Contemporary Safety Beliefs and Foundations. Three credits. 
Philosophies of the safety movement as expressed by leaders in 
the field related to accident causation, accident prevention, and 
research implications. Emphasis on relationships of environmen- 
tal safety, safety services, and safety instruction to the major safety 
problems of modern living. 

604 Environmental Safety. Three credits. Advanced study of envi- 
ronmental safety and health principles and practices, together 
with related occupational diseases and employer responsibili- 
ties and liability considerations. 

607 Anthropometric Factors in Accident Prevention. Three cred- 
its. The necessity and desirability of a thorough consideration of 
anthropometric factors when designing facilities and equipment 
and recognition of those factors most prevalent in accidents. 

61 1 Designing for Economical Production. Three credits. Factors 
determining the acceptability of a product from a producibility 
point of view, includes an analysis of function and cost, relative 
machining cost, material cost, manufacturing method, cost of 
tolerances, and surface finishes for the selected manufacturing 
methods. 

618 Seminar in Industrial Quality Developments. Three credits. 
Review of current quality control practices. Investigation of new 
concepts and literature in the discipline. Examinations of ven- 
dor/customer relationships in quality. 



Engineering Technology and industrial Studies 87 



623 Advanced Technical Drafting. Three credits. Current trends and 
techniques such as using computers to solve design problems 
and the use of group suggestions (brainstorming) in solving de- 
sign problems. 

624 Advanced Technical Problems in Metal. Three credits. In-depth 
insight into the use of metal in industry. Emphasis on industrial 
research and development techniques and their application in 
industry. 

626 Advanced Technical Problems in Electricity/Electronics. Three 
credits. In-depth insight into the practical applications of elec- 
tronic theory. Students required to design and develop electri- 
cal/electronic applications of an advanced nature. 

637 Computer-Integrated Design and Manufacturing. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: ET 459/559 or consent of instructor. Applica- 
tions of computer-integrated manufacturing. Current techniques 
of design for manufacturing and the integration into informa- 
tion flow, organization, product design, and software applica- 
tions. 

651/ Problems in Industrial Studies. Three credits each. Indepen- 
652 dent investigation and report of current problems of particular 

interest to individual students directed by department faculty 

members. 

662 Methods of Research. Three credits. Introduces Master of Sci- 
ence students to scholarly research principles and to thesis for- 
mats for research reporting. A problem is researched and writ- 
ten up in thesis proposal format. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Prerequisite: ETIS 662. 
Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, 
collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. Once 
enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of 
master's research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

691/ Problems in Production Management. Three credits each. 

692 Independent investigation and report of a problem in produc- 
tion management. Designed to meet the particular needs of the 
students; pursued under the direction of a department faculty 
member. 



Courses in Engineering Technology [ET] 

522 Advanced Metalwork. Four credits. Techniques, equipment and 
procedures, advantages and disadvantages of current metal-cast- 
ing processes used in industry. Laboratory exercises in sand 
molding and casting, the full mold process, investment casting, 
and permanent mold casting including pattern design and con- 
struction, mold making, metal melting and handling. Guest 
lecturer(s). Plant tour(s). 



523 



528 



Advanced Machine Tool Technology. Four credits. Taper turn- 
ing, boring and thread chasing, and calculations of screw threads 
and other operations. Gear terminology and calculations, prac- 
tice gear cutting on the milling machine, use of index head. 

Computer-Aided Manufacturing: Numerical Control (NC). 
Four credits. Role of NC in today's manufacturing environment; 
machines and machine control systems of a typical installation; 
justification. Emphasis on writing and debugging programs for a 
three-axis milling machine and a two-axis turning machine util- 
izing CNC and computer-aided part programming. For those 
with little or no experience with NC or those seeking to broaden 
their knowledge of NC. 



L 



533 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting. Four credits. Prerequi- 
site: ET 536 or CM 532. Interactive computer drafting and de- 
sign using advanced AutoCad software and add-ons. Primarily 
for students who want to increase their capabilities using CAD 
software and hardware. 

534 Design of Machine Elements. Three credits. Analytical design 
methods of machine elements. Stress analysis, working stress, 
combined stresses, failure theories, fatigue failure. Design tech- 
niques for shafts, fasteners, gears, bearings, and belt and chain 
drives. Includes a design project. Lecture. 

536 Computer-Assisted Drafting/Design II. Four credits. Prerequi- 
sites: ET 231 or ETIS 332. Utilizes MS-DOS computer and Auto- 
CAD Software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of 
mechanical and architectural solid models for design and pro- 
duction purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to 
enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction 
of two-dimensional engineering drawings. 

537 Tool Design. Four credits. Design of tools, fixtures, gages, and 
dies. Translates product drawing specifications to tooling con- 
cepts. Utilizes computer drafting. 

542 Industrial Safety. Three credits. Safety and health problems in 
the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, includ- 
ing pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and liability 
considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and 
practices for safety engineering, accident investigation and re- 
cording, safety education, and safety enforcement. 

544 Fire Safety. Three credits. Possible prevention activities, fire 
hazards and their causes, and fire inspection techniques. 

545 Industrial Hygiene. Three credits. Safety and health education 
training, and investigation activities and how they are related to 
overall environmental safety. 

559 Fundamentals of Computer- Integrated Manufacturing. Three 
credits. Identification of the terms, applications, and require- 
ments for using computer-integrated manufacturing. An overall 
view of the design, drafting, manufacturing, and integration as- 
pects of using computers for manufacturing. Includes manufac- 
turing, human, and business elements. 

560 Programmable Logic Controllers. Two credits. Introduces pro- 
grammable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and 
troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC 
emphasized. 

561 Instrumentation and Controls. Four credits. Devices and tech- 
niques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Con- 
sideration of accurates and sources of error, identification of 
typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stabil- 
ity, and response. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory. 

563 Local Area Networks. Four credits. Foundation and experience 
to understand the design, implementation, and management 
strategies of local area networks (LAN). Data communications 
standards and protocol fundamentals included. Lecture, labo- 
ratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. 

564 Industrial Electricity. Four credits. AC power theory and cir- 
cuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power fac- 
tor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and se- 
lection of motors and generators. Control subsystems with em- 
phasis on power electronics. 

565 Introduction to Microprocessors. Four credits. Prerequisite: ET 
362. Introductory course in microprocessor-based systems and 



88 Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies 



their related components. Machine language programming ex- 
tensively used to solve problems and to demonstrate the rela- 
tionship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. 
Basic microcomputer architerture also emphasized. Two hours 
lecture and four hours laboratory. 

566 Microprocessor Interfacing. Four credits. Analog and digital 
conversion devices and their related systems. Introduction to 
individual subsystems; A/D and D/A data conversion. Organiza- 
tion and design of individual digital systems emphasized. In- 
cludes data transfer, conversion, storage, input and output with 
principal focus on systems external to computer systems. 

567 Microprocessor Design. Four credits. Advanced course in de- 
sign and application of microprocessor-based microcomputers 
for measurement and control systems. In-depth analysis of soft- 
ware and hardware in the design process. Design, develop, and 
test an operating system for a microprocessor-based computer. 

568 Electronic Fabrication. Four credits. Prerequisite: ET 361 or 
equivalent. Planning and designingelectronic packaging, includ- 
ing printed circuit board design, component selection criteria, 
and construction techniques. Conventional and computer-aided 
printed circuit board design techniques used. 

569 Electronic System Analysis. Four credits. Introduces theory of 
electronic trouble shooting and proper repair techniques of elec- 
tronic devices. 

570 Transform Circuit Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisites: ET360 
and MATH 221 or permission of instructor. An advanced course 
in network analysis that stresses network theorems and solu- 
tions of time and frequency-domain problems with the use of 
Laplace Transforms. 

571 Industrial Seminar. One credit. Orientation to industrial job 
opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and 
preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter). Guest 
lectures, films, and student and faculty presentations. 

585 Fluid Power. Three credits. Systems and the basic components 
that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, 
and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic 
symbols associated with fluid power and the performance char- 
acteristics of system components. Lecture, laboratory, and prob- 
lem solving. 

586 Robotics. Three credits. Introduces the fundamentals of robots. 
Types of robots and controls, the prime movers, and the appli- 
cation of robots in the industrial environment. 

590 Productivity Strategies. Three credits. Analysis, design, and 
implementation of productivity strategies and improvement pro- 
grams for a wide variety of organizations. Touches a wide spec- 
trum of disciplines such as work design, quality, design engi- 
neering, and employee involvement. 

591 Maintenance Management. Three credits. Overview of the 
management of maintenance in an organization such as manu- 
facturing, hospitals, or large maintenance shops. Application of 
work measurement, labor utilization, preventative maintenance, 
and computer applications. 

592 Plant Layout and Materials Handling. Three credits. An over- 
view of facility planning including equipment selection, work 
flow analysis, activity relationship analysis, and plant layout for 
product, process, and JIT requirements. Teams assigned actual 
projects in industry. CAD layout presentations to industry man- 
agement required. 



593 Production Planning and Control. Three credits. Concepts of 
manufacturing planning, forecasting, material requirements, 
planning, and control of inventories. Emphasis on computer sys- 
tems for planning, scheduling, and control. Plant tours and spe- 
cial presentations are supplementary 

594 Methods and Work Measurement Three credits. Design of work 
tasks, including analysis and improvement of existing tasks. Es- 
tablishing engineered time standards by stopwatch, pre-deter- 
mined times, and work sampling. Application of computer sys- 
tems in work measurement. 

595 Statistical Quality Control. Three credits. Statistical quality 
analysis of manufacturing processes including product sampling 
and design of overall quality system; study of various systems in 
use in industry. 

596 Human Factors Engineering (Ergonomics). Three credits. Inte- 
gration of the human into the work task environment. Emphasis 
on practical applications of ergonomics to task design and analy- 
sis. Design teams apply concepts to real world problems. Pre- 
sentation of projects. Computer applications reviewed. 

597 Engineering Economy. Three credits. Development of capital 
budgets; justification of capital projects using time value of 
money concepts; replacement analysis. Review of justification 
of actual capital projects and computer applications. 

598 Federal and State Safety Legislation. Three credits. The Fed- 
eral Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and the Ten- 
nessee Occupational Safety and Health Act (TOSHA) Environ- 
mental Protection Agency; rules and regulations and how they 
apply to industry. 

Course in Construction Management [CM] 

532 Architectural Computer-Aided Drafting and Design. Four cred- 
its. Using computers to draw and design residential architec- 
tural plans. Specifically geared toward the construction area of 
concentration. 

Courses in Industrial Education [lED] 

500 Program Development and Modification for the Special Needs 
Learner. Three credits. Basic strategies for identifying and work- 
ing with special needs learners In industrial education. 

501 History and Philosophy of Industrial Education. Three cred- 
its. Relation to the development of industrial education stressed. 

503 Course Development in Occupational and Technology Educa- 
tion. Three credits. Basic techniques including occupational 
analysis, preparing objectives, planning a learning sequence, 
preparing learning activities, selecting and preparing learning 
resources, and evaluating student performance. 

504 Methods of Teaching Occupational and Technology Educa- 
tion. Three credits. Understanding and skills required for indi- 
vidualizing instruction in industrial arts and trade and industrial 
education. 

506 Organization and Operation of Occupational Student Organi- 
zations. Three credits. Orientation to incorporating occupational 
education programs. Emphasis on establishing an organization, 
planning chapter activities, utilizing community resources, chap- 
ter business procedures, and competitive activities. 



89 



507 Laboratory Organization and Classroom Management. Three 
credits. Laboratory planning and layout, purchasing supplies and 
equipment, inventory and record keeping, laboratory mainte- 
nance, class organization, and safety. 

548 Topics in Industrial Education. One to six credits. Selected top- 
ics offered as required to meet class needs. 

Courses In Environmental Science 
and Technology [EST] 

577 Pollution Control Technology. Four credits. Introduces air, noise, 
solid waste, and water pollution control technology. Legislative 
regulations and equality standards, pollution types and sources, 
detection and analysis instruments, and treatment principles and 
practices. 

578 Air, Solids, and Noise Pollution Technology. Four credits. Pre- 
requisites: 8 hours each chemistry, biology, and physics or per- 
mission of instructor. Introduces air, noise, solid, and hazardous 
waste pollution technology, including legislative regulations and 
quality standards: sources, detection, and analysis instrumenta- 
tion and practices, and treatment and abatement principles, 
equipment, and practices. 

581 Energy and the Environment. Three credits. Introduces sources 
and methods of energy production and classifications of energy 
usages, with emphasis on usage trends, energy conservation strat- 
egies, and alternate energy utilization. 

582 Solar Building Design. Three credits. Introduces environmen- 
tal and economic impact of solar energy for residential and light 
industrial construction including topics such as day lighting, 
passive solar design, and hot water heating. 

584 Energy Auditing. Three credits. Introducestypesof energy con- 
sumption and classifications of energy usages. Emphasis on con- 
servation strategies and total management for residential and 
industrial plants. 

587 Passive Solar Design. Three credits. Introduces passive solar 
techniques in the construction of residential and light industrial 
structures. Includes day lighting, passive solar design, methods, 
and system integration. 




Department of 
English 



William Connelly, Chair 
Peck Hall 302 

The Department of English offers the Master of Arts, 
the Doctor of Arts, and a minor at the graduate level. 

Normally, the combined test score for consideration for 
admission to the Master of Arts program is at least 900 
on two parts of the Graduate Record Examination. For 
admission to the Doctor of Arts program, a minimum 
score of 1,000 on the GRE is expected. Scores will be 
calculated using two of the following parts of the GRE: 
Verbal, Analytical, Subject. 

Admissions Process 

Admission to graduate study is not automatic by meeting 
minimal admission requirements. Students are selected from 
a pool of qualified applicants. Applications for summer/fall 
admission must be complete by May 1 . Application for spring 
admission must be complete by November 1 . Those seeking 
teaching assistantships must provide a 500-word statement 
of purpose and apply by March 1 for the following fall se- 
mester. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts 
(500 and 600 level) 

Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned at least 30 semester hours of undergradu- 
ate English; 

2. fulfill a foreign language requirement in one of the fol- 
lowing ways: 

a. complete 18 undergraduate semester hours of a foreign lan- 
guage or complete 6 semester hours of 300-level work in a 
foreign language, 

b. earn a final grade of A or B in a foreign language course num- 
bered 321, 

c. pass a reading examination administered by the Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures Department; 

d. earn a final grade of B or better in both ENGL 601/701 (Old 
English) and 602/702 (Beowulf), which must be taken sequen- 
tially. 

either 

a. complete 30 semester hours in English, including ENGL 664 
and 666 with no more than 30 percent of the total degree 
hours dually listed as undergraduate/graduate courses, or 

b. elect a minor, in which the student takes a minimum of 12 
semester hours, plus a minimum of 1 8 hours in English includ- 
ing ENGL 664 and 666; 

file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 
successfully complete a thesis defense. 



3. 



4. 



90 English 



Non-Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned at least 30 sennester hours of undergradu- 
ate English; 

2. fulfill a foreign language requirement in one of the fol- 
lowing ways: 

a. complete 1 8 undergraduate semester hours of a foreign lan- 
guage or complete 6 semester hours of 300-level work In a 
foreign language, 

b. earn a final grade of A or B in a foreign language course 
numbered 321, 

c. pass a reading examination administered by the Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures Department; 

d. earn a final grade of B or better in both ENGL 601/701 (Old 
English) and 602/702 (Beowulf), which must be taken se- 
quentially. 

3. either 

a. complete 36 semester hours in English with no more than 
30 percent of the total degree hours dually listed as under- 
graduate/graduate courses; or 

b. elect a minor, in which the student takes a minimum of 12 
semester hours, plus a minimum of 24 hours in English, in- 
cluding ENGL 666 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete a written examination in a selected 
area of concentration (the examination may be taken no 
more than twice). 

Requirements for the Doctor of Arts 
(500, 600, and 700 level) 

1 . Candidate must have earned undergraduate prerequisites 
of at least 30 semester hours in English and 20 semester 
hours of English at the master's level. 

2. There are two alternatives: 
Alternative #1 

48 semester hours above the master's level with at least 
two-thirds of the program on the 700 level and ENGL 
666/766 or its transfer equivalent. 500-level course may 
not be applied. Work in the major teaching field will 
consist of at least 24 semester hours of classwork, plus 6 
semester hours of the internship, plus at least 6 semester 
hours for the dissertation. 
Alternative #2 

60 semester hours above the master's level with at least 
two-thirds of the program on the 700 level and ENGL 
666/766 or its transfer equivalent. 500-level courses may 
not be applied. Work in the first teaching field will con- 
sist of at least 1 8 semester hours of classwork in English, 
with that in the second teaching field consisting of at 
least 1 8 semester hours of classwork in any subject which 
is offered as a major at the master's level, plus 6 semes- 
ter hours of internship/externship, plus at least 6 semes- 
ter hours for the dissertation. 

3. A core of professional education courses of 1 2 semester 
hours must be taken consisting of FOED 752 and 756 
andSPSE 754 AND 755. 

4. A foreign language requirement must be fulfilled in one 
of the following ways: 

a. earning a final grade of A or B in a foreign language course 
numbered 321; 



b. passing a reading examination administered by the Foreign i 
Languages and Literature Department; 

c. earn a final grade of B or better in both ENGL 601/701 (Old ( 
English) and 602/702 (Beowulf), which must be taken se- 
quentially; 

d. meeting this requirement at the M.A. level. 

5. A Candidacy Form must be filed with the Graduate Of- 
fice prior to the completion of 30 credit hours and ap- 
pointment of a doctoral committee. 

6. A written examination must be completed successfully 
in two selected areas of emphasis. 

7. Following successful completion of written exams, a dis- ■ 
sertation must be prepared according to one of the fol- 
lowing: 

a. a problem in the student's major field aimed at specific cur- 
riculum development; 

b. research into or critical analysis of a body of literary materials; 

c. an interdisciplinary topic. 

In case a, the dissertation committee should be com- 
posed of members from English and education; in case : 
b, the committee may be composed solely of members ■ 
of the English Department; in case c, the committee: 
should be composed of members from English, the re- 
lated field, and education. 

8. A final oral defense of the dissertation must be completed 
successfully. 

Courses in English [ENGL] 

501 Folklore. Three credits. Forms and types of folk culture with ' 
particular emphasis on the folk literature of the United States. 

551 Modern English Grammar and Usage. Three credits. Histori- 
cal development of the theory and practice of modern English ■ 
grammar and usage. 

553 History of the English Language. Three credits. Traces the de- 
velopment of the English language from cuneiform writing sys- 
tems, Semitic and Phoenician syllabaries, through Greek and 
Latin contributions. Old and Middle English, up to Modern En- 
glish. 

554 Approaches to Teaching ESL Grammar and Writing. Three: 

credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 441/551 . A survey of the background : 
and basic methods needed to teach English grammar and com- 
position to students for whom English is a second language. Em- 
phasizes understanding the problems non-native speakers facei 
and developing techniques for helping non-native speakers ex- 
press themselves in written English. 

586 Special Topics in Film Studies. Three credits. A selected direc- 
tor, genre, period, aspect, or theme. Subject will vary each time i 
course is taught. 

600/ Poetry Workshop. Three credits. A rigorous writing course to: 

700 develop the advanced writer's use of point-of-view, tone, rhythm, i 
meter, line, and stanza. Practice in both the spontaneity of com- 
position and the deliberate, disciplined work of revision. Ex- 
amination, through poems and essays by relevant authors, ofi 
the movements, forms, and possibilities of contemporary po- 
etry. 

601/ Old English Language and Literature. Three credits. Prerequi- 

701 site for ENGL 602/702, Beowulf. Introduction to Old English i'' 
language (grammar, phonology, syntax, and vocabulary) and lit- 
erature (poetry and prose) and to the historical and cultural back- 
ground of the Anglo-Saxon period. 



English 91 



602/ Beowulf. Three credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 601/701 . Intensive 
702 line-by-line study of Beowulf in Old English, with special em- 
phasis on its sources and analogues, 20th century criticism, and 
current dating studies of the poem. 

603/ Chaucer Seminar. Three credits. 
703 

604/ Studies in Old and Middle English Literature. Three credits. 

704 The Anglo-Saxon language and Middle English dialects; Old 
English literary types; Middle English literary types; major poets 
of the fourteenth century, excluding Chaucer. 

605/ Studies in Early English Drama, Excluding Shakespeare: 900- 

705 1642. Three credits. The origin and development of English 
drama, emphasizing Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama and the 
contributions of Shakespeare's contemporaries and successors. 

611/ Spenser Seminar. Three credits. 
711 

612/ Studies in Sixteenth-Century English Prose and Poetry. Three 

712 credits. 

613/ Studies in Seventeenth-Century English Prose and Poetry. 

713 Three credits. Selected nondramatic literature of the century, 
with primary emphasis on the seventeenth century before the 
Restoration. Included are Donne, Herbert, and the metaphysi- 
cal poets and Jonson and the Cavalier poets. 

614/ Studies in Milton. Three credits. The major poetry of John 

714 Milton, including Lycidas, Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes, and 
Paradise Regained. 

615/ Studies in Shakespeare. Three credits. Shakespeare's poems 

715 and plays, emphasizing poetic and dramatic techniques in 
Shakespeare's works and critical reaction to those works. 

620/ Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature. Three 

720 credits. Designed to give students a definite critical knowledge 
of the major literary works of restoration and eighteenth-cen- 
tury England, 1660-1800. Course may focus on either drama, 
poetry, or prose or a combination. 

621/ Studies in English Romanticism: Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

721 Three credits. 

622/ Studies in English Romanticism: Shelley, Byron, and Keats. 

722 Three credits. 

623/ Major British Writers. Three credits. An in-depth study of one, 

723 two, or three British writers. Course varies according to interests 
of instructor and students. 

627/ Studies in Victorian Literature. Three credits. Intellectual back- 
727 backgrounds of the Victorian period; major prose writers: 

Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Ruskin, Arnold, Pater; major 

poets: Tennyson, Browning, Arnold. 

629/ Modern British Literature. Three credits. Intellectual back- 

729 grounds of modern British literature; major novelists: Forster 
Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence; major poets: Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Tho- 
mas; selected minor writers. 

t 

630/ History of Children's Literature. Three credits. History of Brit- 

730 ish and American literature for children and analysis of issues in 
the field. 



633/ A,B Major American Writers. Three credits. An in-depth study 

733 of two or three American writers. Course varies according to 
interests of instructor and students. 

634/ African-American Literature. Three credits. An in-depth study 

734 of the African-American literary tradition, with emphasis on sig- 
nificant authors, genres, texts, and contexts. 

635/ Critics and Criticism. Three credits. Examines significant criti- 

735 cal movements in Western literature from classical times into 
the twentieth century. Focusing on major critics such as Aristotle, 
Johnson, Coleridge, and Eliot, the course also treats less influ- 
ential figures and considers practical applications of theory to 
specific texts. 

636/ Studies in Southern Literature. Three credits. Themes, theo- 

736 ries, movements, and types of literature produced in the Ameri- 
can South with particular emphasis on selected authors and texts. 

637/ Satire. Three credits. Satire as a distinct genre, emphasizing its 

737 continuity in Western literature from its roots among the Creeks 
to its resurgence in the twentieth century; representative works 
from four periods: ancient, medieval and Renaissance, eight- 
eenth century, and modern; prose, poetry, and drama. 

638/ Modern Critical Theory. Three credits. Covers major critical 

738 trends in literary theory since 1 965, including feminist, Marxist, 
structuralist, and deconstructive approaches to literature. Stu- 
dents explore background and implications of these theories 
and analyze selected works of literature in light of these ap- 
proaches. 

639/ Reading Postmodernism. Three credits. Theoretical discourse 

739 which works to define the cultural mindset known as "piost- 
modernism." Theories examined will be applied to examples of 
postmodern literature, film, and/or television. Topics empha- 
sized include the instability of social and cultural categories, the 
dissolving boundaries between "high" and "low" culture and 
art, and the subversion of realist narrative strategies. 

640/ American Literature to 1800. Three credits. 
740 

641/ Studies in American Literature: 1800-1860. Three credits. 
741 

642/ Studies in American Literature: 1860-1910. Three credits. 
742 

643/ Studies in American Literature: 1910-1950. Three credits. 
743 

644/ Popular Literature of the Twentieth Century. Three credits. The 

744 forms of literature reflecting the mass culture of America from 
1900 to the present, including such genres as the mystery, the 
western, science fiction and fantasy, popular humor, comic strips, 
popular poetry, song lyrics, and the aesthetics of non-print media. 

645/ Contemporary Feminist Fiction. Three credits. Feminist writ- 

745 ers of fiction from the 1960s to the present, emphasizing the 
connections between literature and feminist theoretical and criti- 
cal discourse. 

646/ Studies in Contemporary Drama. Three credits. The develop- 

746 ment of world drama from 1950 to the present, with attention 
to related criticism and theory. 

647/ Studies in Narratology. Three credits. Examines modern and 

747 contemporary theories of narrative (modernist, rhetorical struc- 



92 



turalist, dialogical) with particular application to selected au- 
thors and texts. 

648/ Studies in Contemporary Literature. Three credits. Intellectual 

748 backgrounds of contemporary literature; significant develop- 
ments in fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry, and drama. 

649/ Studies in the Novel. Three credits. The novel as a literary 

749 genre may be approached from a variety of perspectives, in- 
cluding generic, historical, theoretical, or single-author ap- 
proaches. Course varies according to interests of instructor and 
students. 

650/ A, B Selected Topics in Literature and Language. Three cred- 

750 its. A specialized field of literary or linguistic inquiry, its bibliog- 
raphy, critical problems, and probable solutions. Topics vary with 
the professor assigned to the course. 

651/ Modern Rhetoric and Prose Style. Three credits. 
751 

652/ Essentials of Linguistics. Three credits. Major linguistic ap- 
752 proaches to the study of language-dominant trends and current 
issues in linguistics; the phonological, morphological, and syn- 
tactic structure of the English language. 

656/ Seminar in Teaching Composition. Three credits. Open only 

756 to first-year teaching assistants or with consent of instructor. 

657/ Teaching Practicum in Portfolio Assessment. Three credits. 

757 Prerequisite: ENGL 656/756. A supervised teaching experience 
using the portfolio system of writing assessment. Students will 
teach one or two sections of ENGL 1 1 1 and participate in work- 
shops for portfolio teachers and in team assessments of fresh- 
man portfolios. Open only to first-year teaching assistants or 
with consent of instructor. 

658/ Computers and Writing. Three credits. Practical and theoreti- 

758 cal implicationsof computer technology and of the Internet and 
world wide web for the teaching of writing. 

659/ SeminarinTeachingof Literature. Three credits. Recommended 

759 for second-year teaching assistants and others interested in teach- 
ing literature. 

662/ Directed Reading and Research. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
762 Permission of the director of graduate studies. Individually su- 
pervised reading and research either in a historical period of 
English or American literature or in a major literary genre. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

666/ Introduction to Graduate Study: Bibliography and Research. 

766 Three credits. Literary scholarship: its nature and scope; tradi- 
tional and modern methods; the definition and solution of re- 
search problems; the production of literary scholarship. Required 
of all Master's students enrolling in English. 

760/ Internship. Three credits each. 
761 

764 Dissertation Research. One to six credits. Selection of a re- 
search problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and 
analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, 
student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral 
research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 



Department of 
Foreign Languages 
and Literatures 



James T. Brooks, Interim Chair 
Boutwell Dramatic Arts Building 301 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures 
offers the Master of Arts in Teaching with concentra- 
tions in either French, German, or Spanish. Also offered 
is a minor at the graduate leveL Students who would 
like to minor in foreign languages should determine the 
requirements based on their major curriculum in con- 
sultation with their advisors. 

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. A 
combined score of 800 on the verbal and either quan- 
titative or analytical portions of the Graduate Record 
Examination is considered indicative of potential for an 
acceptable level of academic performance. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts 
in Teaching — Foreign Languages Major 
(500 and 600 level) 

This degree is intended to prepare native and non-native 
speal<ers of the foreign language for a career in foreign lan- 
guage teaching on the elementary or secondary level. Stu- 
dents planning to teach in elementary school must be licensed 
prior to admission to the M.A.T. program. Those planning to 
teach on the secondary level may be already licensed or may 
pursue licensure while enrolled in the M.A.T. program; how- 
ever, requirements for admission to teacher education must 
be met. Students select a concentration from French, Ger- 
man, or Spanish. 

Candidate must 

1. have earned at least 24 semester hours of the language 
selected for admission to the program. Students may com- 
plete up to 6 hours of these undergraduate hours while 
concurrently enrolled in the graduate program. Native 
speakers must consult with the graduate director regard- 
ing this requirement. 

2. complete a minimum of 33 semester hours including 21 
hours in foreign language courses as listed below OR 18 
hours in foreign languages and ENGL 652, Essentials of 
Linguistics; no more than 30 percent of the total degree 
hours dual-listed as undergraduate/graduate hours can 
be counted toward the degree; 

3. complete a professional education component approved 
by the chair of the Educational Leadership Department; 

4. achieve an oral proficiency level in the target language of 
at least 'Advanced" and a written proficiency level of 'Ad- 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 93 



vanced Plus" on the ACTFL scale; students should con- 
sult the foreign languages graduate director for additional 
information on this requirement; 

5. demonstrate a basic reading knowledge in a language 
other than the target language; this requirement may be 
met by passing a foreign language reading examination 
or by earning a final grade of A or B in French or German 
321; 

6. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

7. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination that covers language teaching methods and the 
language, literature, and culture of the target language 
(may be taken no more than twice). 

Choices Under the M.A.T. in Foreign Languages 

Candidates for the M.A.T. with a major in Foreign Languages 
and a concentration in either French, German, or Spanish 
may choose whether or not to seek licensure to teach. The 
curriculum selected is based on the individual's preference 
and need: 

1 . for those already licensed to teach in the state of Tennes- 
see; 

2. for those who seek licensure in conjunction with the 
M.A.T. degree; 

3. for those who wish to pursue the degree without teacher 
licensure in Tennessee. 

The foreign language requirement under each option is the 
same; candidates should consult an advisor in the Educa- 
tional Leadership Department regarding the courses perti- 
nent to their degree and career goals. 

Required courses in foreign languages: 

F L 601 Foreign Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice, 

3 hours (taught in English) 
French, German, or Spanish 600 seminar, 3 hours 
FL 670 or ENGL 652, 3 hours 

6 hours of electives in 500-or 600-level courses in the concentration 
selected 
6 hours selected from the following: 

F L 699 6 hours of internship abroad OR 

F L 699 3 hours of local internship AND 

F L 680 Instructional Technology in Foreign Language 
Education OR 

F L 690 Issues in Foreign Language Acquisition 

Courses in Foreign Languages [F L] 

550 Introduction to Teaching Foreign Language. Three credits. In- 
troduces students to a variety of approaches and methods for 
foreign language instruction in elementary or secondary schools. 

601 Foreign Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice. Three 
credits. Acquaints students with major theories of foreign lan- 
guage acquisition and various approaches to language learning. 

602 Reading, Writing, and Learning in ESL. Three credits. (Same as 
YOED 602.) Provides teaching ideas for promoting oral, read- 
ing, and writing development in English for K-1 2 English learn- 
ers. Language acquisition theory, classroom organization, teach- 
ing strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English 
learner instruction. 



664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled for thesis re- 
search, students should register for at least one credit hour of 
research each semester until the thesis is completed. S/U grad- 
ing. 

670 Introduction to Linguistics. Three credits. Basic concepts of 
linguistic analysis, which are applied to linguistic phenomena in 
French, German, Spanish, and English. 

675 Romance Linguistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: F L 670, ENGL 
652, or permission of instructor. Introduces linguistic heritage 
of Latin as manifested in modern Spanish, French, Italian, Por- 
tuguese, Catalan, Sardinian, and Rumanian. Earlier language 
stages as well as mechanisms of language evolution also exam- 
ined. Knowledge of one Romance language helpful but not re- 
quired. 

680 Instructional Technology In Foreign Language Education. Three 
credits. An introductory course with an emphasis on telecom- 
munication and computer applications. Critical examination and 
evaluation of existing technologies and programs. 

690 Issues In Foreign Language Acquisition. One, two, or three 
credits. (May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.) Prereq- 
uisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. Independent study to 
address a problem or investigate an issue agreed upon by both 
student and instructor. 

699 Internship. Three or six credits. Prerequisite: F L 601 . Three 
credits are given for a supervised teaching internship at MTSU; 
six credits are given for a teaching internship abroad. LInder 
certain circumstances a self-designed, non-teaching internship 
may be undertaken locally or in a foreign country where the 
target language is spoken. Students should consult the graduate 
director in Foreign Languages and Literatures for details. 

Courses in French [FREN] 

510 Topics In Twentieth-Century French Literature. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: 6 hours of French beyond the intermediate level 
or permission of the instructor. 

515 Topics in French Film. Three credits. 

520 Topics In Nineteenth-Century French Literature. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: 6 hours of French beyond the intermediate level 
or permission of the instructor. 

525 Topics in Eighteenth-Century French Literature and Culture. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of French beyond the inter- 
mediate level or permission of the instructor. 

530 Topics In Medieval and Renaissance French Literature. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of French beyond the intermedi- 
ate level or permission of the instructor. 

533 Topics In Neoclassical French Literature. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: 6 hours of French beyond the intermediate level or 
permission of the instructor. 

590 Directed Study In French Literature and Culture. One to six 

credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of French beyond the intermedi- 
ate level or permission of the instructor Individualized inten- 
sive reading in primary and secondary sources relating to a spe- 
cific topic in French literature or culture. Arrangements must be 
made with instruaor prior to registration. 



94 Foreign Languages and Literatures 



600 Seminar In French Studies. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Comprehensive study of history and structure 
of French language; advanced stylistics leading to research proj- 
ect of cultural, literary, or linguistic topic. 

697 Seminar in French Literature. Three credits. Prerequisites: 9 
hours of French on the 400/500 level; must be of graduate sta- 
tus in the M.A. program or have permission of professor. An in- 
depth look at specific topics, themes, and/or authors in French 
literature from the medieval period to the present. May be taken 
twice. 

Courses In German [GERM] 

534 A, B, C, D Topics in German Literature. Three credits each. 
Prerequisite: 6 hours of German beyond intermediate level or 
permission of instructor. 

A. The Art of E.T.A. Hoffmann 

B. The Bourgeois Novel (Keller, Raabe) 

C. The Prose Fiction of Thomas Mann 

D. The Prose Fiction of Hermann Hesse and Franz Kafka 

550 German Literature: 1725-1880. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 
hours of German beyond intermediate level or permission of 
instructor. 

560 German Literature: 1880 to present. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: 6 hours of German beyond intermediate level or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

590 Directed Study in German Literature and Culture. One to six 

credits. Prerequisite: 15 hours of German or permission of in- 
structor. Individualized intensive reading in primary and sec- 
ondary sources relating to a specific topic in German literature 
or culture. Arrangements must be made with instructor prior to 
registration. 

600 Seminar in German Studies. Three credits. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. Comprehensive study of history and struc- 
ture of German language; advanced stylistics leading to research 
project of cultural, literary, or linguistic topic. 

697 Seminar in German Literature. Three credits. Prerequisites: 9 
hours of German at the 400 level or higher or permission of 
instructor; graduate status in the M.A. or M.A.T. program. An in- 
depth study of an author, genre, period, or literary movement 
in German literature from 1 850 to present. May be taken twice. 

Courses in Spanish [SPAN] 

510 History of the Spanish Language. Three credits. Historical de- 
velopment of Spanish from Latin. Students also become famil- 
iar with the chararteristics of Old Spanish. 

515 Spanish Literature I. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of Span- 
ish beyond the intermediate level or permission of instructor. 
Spanish literature from its beginnings to 1 700, emphasis on liter- 
ary history, styles, and themes. Prose fiction and non-fiction, 
poetry, and drama Included. 

525 Spanish Literature II. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 
Spanish beyond the intermediate level or permission of instruc- 
tor. Works from different genres which represent major literary 
movements from the eighteenth century to the present. 

544 Latin American Literature I. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours 
of Spanish beyond the intermediate level or permission of in- 



structor. Latin American literature from pre-Columbian times 
through Romanticism. Prose fiction and non-fiaion, poetry, and 
drama Included. I 

545 Latin American Literature II. Three credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours f 
of Spanish beyond the intermediate level or permission of in- 
structor. Major works of Latin American literature from the late 
nineteenth century to the present. 

555 Special Topics in Hispanic Studies. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: 6 hours of Spanish beyond the intermediate level or per- 
mission of instructor. Topics in language, culture, or literature. 

565 Special Topics in Spanish Literature or Culture. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: 6 hours of Spanish beyond the Intermediate level 
or permission of instructor. Topics In peninsular Spanish litera- 
ture or culture 

575 Special Topics in Latin American Literature or Culture. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of Spanish beyond the Interme- 
diate level or permission of Instructor. Topics In specialized ar- 
eas of Latin American literature or culture vary. 

590A Directed Readings in Spanish Literature and Culture. I 

5908 Directed Readings in Latin American Literature and Culture.! 

One to six credits. Prerequisite: 1 5 hours of Spanish or permis- 
sion of instructor. Individualized intensive reading In primary 
and secondary sources relating to a specific topic in Spanish or 
Latin American literature or culture. Arrangements must be made 
with instructor prior to registration. 

600 Seminar in Spanish Studies. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Comprehensive study of history and structure 
of Spanish language; advanced stylistics leading to research 
project of cultural, literary, or linguistic topic. 

697 Seminar in Hispanic Literature. Three credits. Prerequisite: 9 
hours of Spanish at the 400-500 level or higher or permission of 
the instructor. An in-depth study of an author, genre, period, or 
literary movement in Peninsular or Latin American literature, i 
May be taken twice. 




95 



Department of 
Geography and 
Geology 



Ronald L Zawislak, Chair 
Kirksey Old Main 325B 

The Department of Geography and Geology offers a 
minor at the graduate level. 

Courses in Geography [GEOG] 

528 Special Problems and Topics in Geography. One to six credits. 
Research participation or guided readings in a particular area or 
topic appropriate to the student's interests and professional ob- 
jectives. The type and amount of additional work will be de- 
cided upon when student registers for the course. 

531 Resource Management and Conservation. Three credits. Cur- 
rent problems related to an intelligent use and management of 
our environmental resources. Additional projects, reports, and/ 
or papers. 

532 Economic Geography. Three credits. Relationship of the physi- 
cal factors of the environment to the productive occupations of 
humans and the distribution of the products produced. Addi- 
tional projects, reports, and/or papers. 

533 Political Geography. Three credits. Significance of geographi- 
cal factors in understanding political relationships within and 
among nations; spatial implications of political decision-mak- 
ing processes. Additional projects, reports, and/or papers. 



534 



536 



537 



538 



Historical Geography. Three credits. Prerequisite: GEOG 200 

or permission of instructor. The changing human geography of 
the United States during four centuries of settlement and devel- 
opment. Emphasis on changing population patterns as well as 
patterns of urban and rural setSement. Additional projects, re- 
ports, and/or papers. 

Cultural Geography. Three credits. Prerequisite: GEOG 200 or 
permission of instructor. Description and explanation of spatial 
patterns and ecological relationships in human culture. Empha- 
sis on "reading" the cultural landscapes. An in-depth field com- 
ponent will be required. 

Urban Geography. Three credits. An introduction to the devel- 
opment of towns, cities, and associated urban areas. Environ- 
mental problems also examined. Classroom analysis of various 
theories of urban development and of data collected by field 
work. Preparation of appropriate land-use map. 

Cartography. Four credits. General knowledge of the field in- 
cluding familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional 
cartography and graphics. Selected lectures and class discus- 
sions. A series of map construction assignments; a specialized 
map assignment supported by written analysis. Three hours lec- 
ture and two hours laboratory per week. 



540 A, B Field Course. Four credits. Supervised study in some geo- 
graphical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded 
by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and cultural 
elements of the environment, with special attention directed 
toward the pattern of human occupancy. An intensive period of 
study and research on a full-time basis. Work required will de- 
pend on area researched and time involved. Consult depart- 
ment chair for specific fees. 

541 Geography of the United States and Canada. Three credits. 
Natural, cultural, and geographic environment of these regions. 
Additional projects, reports, and/or papers. 

542 Geography of Latin America. Three credits. Geographic regions 
of Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South Amer- 
ica. Policy analysis and supporting data. 

543 Geography of Europe. Three credits. General distribution of 
natural and cultural features of Europe followed by a detailed 
study of the regions and countries of the southern, central, and 
northwestern parts of the continent. Policy analysis of a 
European-oriented problem. 

545 Geography of Australia and Oceania. Three credits. Physical 
and cultural geography of Australia, New Zealand, and the is- 
lands of the Southwest Pacific. Additional projects, reports, and/ 
or papers. 

546 Geography of the Former Soviet Union. Three credits. Analy- 
sis of the natural, cultural, and human use regions of the former 
Soviet Union. A policy analysis of an aspect of the region's ge- 
ography is required. 

547 Rural Settlement. Three credits. Prerequisite: GEOG 200 or 
permission of instructor. A geographical analysis of forms, struc- 
tures, and distribution of rural settlements in distinctive parts of 
the earth based upon their origin, function, and development. 
Special emphasis given in analyzing rural settlements of middle 
Tennessee. Additional projects, reports, and/or papers. 

549 Remote Sensing. Four credits. Prerequisites: GEOG 233 and 

438 (or 538). Various vehicles of remote sensing such as radar, 
satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation 
of maps and applications to land use and environmental prob- 
lems examined. Selection of data from either a numeric or im- 
age remote sensing system, interpreting, and developing a re- 
port from the interpretations. Three hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory per week. 

550 Geography of the Middle East. Three credits. An analysis of the 
problems, issues, and theories involved in understanding the 
physical, cultural, and regional geography of the area. Additional 
projects, reports, and/or papers. 

551 Laboratory Problems in Remote Sensing. Four credits. Com- 
puter processing of selected satellite imagery. Laboratory will 
provide practical experience through design, execution, and 
completion of applied remote sensing projects, one of which 
will be the effects of an environmental impact. 

552 Image Interpretation. Four credits. Principles, methods, and 
techniques of image interpretation including maps, satellite data, 
and aerial photos. Environmental impact of a special project. 
Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 

553 Geographic Information Systems. Four credits. Lecture and 

laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic 
data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical 
application of a geographic information system (GIS) to prob- 



96 Geography and Geology 



lem-solving. Student will take appropriate data and compile an 
environmental impact statement (EIS). Three hours lerture and 
two hours laboratory per week. 

577B Field Course in Historical Archaeology. Three credits. (Same 
as HIST 577B and ANTH 577B.) Prerequisite: HIST 577A, ANTH 
320, or permission of instructor. Archaeological resources and 
procedures and the interpretation of historical evidence under- 
taken at a field archaeological site. 

Courses in Geology [GEOL] 

500 Petrology and Petrography. Four credits. Prerequisite: GEOL 
300. Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Theories 
of formation and evolution based upon mineralogical and geo- 
chemical evidence. Examination and classification of rocks in 
hand sample and thin section. Additional assignments involving 
data analysis and interpretation and completion of a research 
paper required for graduate credit. 

502 Ceomorphic Regions of the United States. Four credits. Pre- 
requisite: GEOL 100 or 201. The origin, regional distribution, 
and geomorphic features and history of the landforms of the 
United States. Students required to analyze maps, structure sec- 
tions, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic form 
and the forces and processes that produced these forms plus 
research a geomorphical problem resulting in a thesis-type pa- 
per. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 

503 Invertebrate Micropaleontology. Four credits. Invertebrate and 
microscopic animal life of the past including recent preserved 
representatives and their ancient fossilized ancestors. Numer- 
ous field trips to local fossil-collecting sites. Designed to aid in 
the preparation of earth science teachers, geologists, and biolo- 
gists. Research paper on a topic approved by instructor. An oral 
presentation of this material may be required. Three hours lec- 
ture and two hours laboratory per week. 

505 Meteorology. Three credits. Prerequisite: GEOL 100 or 201 or 
GEOC 233 or consent of instructor. (PHYS 231 or235andCHEM 
121 recommended.) Physical laws as they relate to the atmo- 
sphere, atmospheric processes and their effects on air masses. 



fronts, and atmospheric circulation, the dynamics of the atmo- 
sphere and its relationship to the hydrosphere. Special problem 
to be assigned by the instructor. 

506 Principles of Ceoscience. Four credits. Includes topics from ge- 
ology, astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography. Specifically 
designed to aid in the preparation of earth science teachers in 
the public schools. Term paper on topic approved by the in- 
structor. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 

507 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy. Four credits. Prerequisite: 
GEOL 100 or 201 or consent of instructor. Sedimentary rocks; 
the processes of sedimentation, the alteration of sediments 
through time, and an examination of the resulting stratigraphic 
units. Designed for geoscience majors and those with interests 
in soil mechanics and civil engineering. Research paper on a 
topic approved by the instructor. An oral presentation may also 
be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per 
week 

508 Structural Geology. Three credits. Prerequisites: Knowledge oi 
trigonometry, GEOL 100 or 210, and 304; GEOL 202 recom- 
mended. Orientation and deformation of rock. Geometric, ana- 
lytical, and statistical solutions to structural problems. Emphasis 
on three-dimensional visualization, problem solving, geological 
map interpretation, and the mechanics of deformation. Case 
analyzing, research, and interpretation required. Lecture and 
laboratory. 

509 Problems in Geology. One to three credits. Prerequisite: A mini-i 
mum of 1 2 semester hours of geology, at least 6 hours of which! 
must be upper division and excluding GEOL 1 00 or by consent 
of instructor. An independent research-oriented project com-i 
mensurate with the student's interests and qualifications. In-i 
depth research requiring extensive and intensive search of ap-i 
plicable literature and large study area. An oral examination and 
discussion required. May be repeated up to a maximum of six hours. 

510 Geophysical Prospecting. Four credits. Prerequisites: GEOL 304 
MATH 1 22, PHYS 231 or 235, or consent of instructor. PHYS 232 
or 236, GEOL 100 or 201, and MATH 221 also recommended. 
Survey of seismic, gravimetric, and magneticVelectrical exploration 



% 



,^' 




97 



methods. Applied course covering some elementary theory, basic 
field practice, computation fundamentals, interpretation techniques. 
Case analysis, research, and interpretation required. Two hours lec- 
ture and two hours laboratory per week. 

511 Earth Geophysics. Three credits. Prerequisites: MATH 122 and 
221 , PHYS 231 or 235, or consent of instructor. Also recommend 
PHYS 232 or 236 and CEOL 100 or 201. Introduction to earth's 
seismicity, magnetism, heat, and radioactivity. History and mechanics 
of earth-moon system, earth rotation, and oscillation discussed. 
Case analysis, research, and interpretation required. 

512 Environmental Geology. Four credits. Prerequisite: CEOL 100 
or 201 or GEOG 233 or consent of instructor. Application of 
geologic information to minimize possible environmental 
degradation and maximize utilization of resources in the natu- 
ral and modified environment, local examples and field trips. 
Topics include engineering properties of earth materials, natu- 
ral hazard prediction and reduction, water supply, solid and 
hazardous wastes, mineral resources, global change, land-use 
planning, environmental impact analysis. Three hours lecture 
and two hours laboratory per week. An in-depth research proj- 
ect and paper required. 

513 Hydrogeology. Four credits. Prerequisites: GEOL 100 or 201 and 
MATH 122 or consent of instructor. Minimum grade of C. Basic 
processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including pre- 
cipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, 
and ground water Emphasis placed on ground water, including 
geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of 
regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer char- 
acteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and con- 
taminant transport. Additional individual research project required, 
including a written and classroom report. Lecture and laboratory. 

514 Inorganic Geochemistry. Three credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 
122 and GEOL 201. Introduces the principles of inorganic 
geochemistry. Geochemistry of the earth and solar system, iso- 
tope geochronometers, thermodynamics of geochemical pro- 
cesses, mineral stability diagrams, isotope fractionation, rates of 
geochemical processes, chemical weathering, chemical com- 
positions of surface and groundwater, geochemical exploration, 
geochemical cycles, environmental geochemistry. Additional 
assignments involving data analysis and interpretation and 
completion of a research paper required for graduate credit. 
Three hours lecture per week. 

515 Environmental Applications of Hydrogeology. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: GEOL 413 or 513 with a minimum grade of C. 
Advanced course that emphasizes applied methods for assess- 
ing hazardous and solid waste facilities and contaminated ground 
water remediation techniques. Included will be site character- 
ization methods, ground water sampling procedures, and moni- 
toring well installation techniques. Additional assignments in- 
volving case history analysis with an oral presentation will be 
required of graduate students. Three hours lecture per week. 

540 C, D Field Course. Four credits. Supervised study in some geo- 
logical area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by 
a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical ele- 
ments of the environment, with special attention directed to- 
ward the geomorphology and geology of scientific areas. An in- 
tensive period of study and research on a full-time basis. Work 
required will depend on area researched and time involved. 
Consult department chair for specific fees. 

Some geography and/or geology courses may be accepted as 
either geography or geology; others are accepted only in one 
discipline. Substitutions are made at discretion of department 
chair in consultation with the academic minor advisor. 



Department of 

Health, 

Physical Education, 

Recreation, and 

Safety 



Martha Whaley, Chair 
Murphy Athletic Center 111 

The Department of Health, Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion, and Safety offers two Master of Science Degrees: 
one with a major in Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation and one with a major in Exercise Science 
and Health Promotion. Three concentrations are avail- 
able under the Master of Science HPER major: Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation. Students may se- 
lect from a thesis or non-thesis option. Graduate mi- 
nors are available in Physical Education, Recreation, 
Safety, or Health. The department also offers the Doc- 
tor of Arts in Physical Education. 

Normally, the required test score for admission to the 
Master of Science in Health, Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion, and Safety program is 30 on the Miller Analogies 
Test or a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record 
Examination. For admission to the Master of Science in 
Exercise Science and Health Promotion program, the 
expectation is 35 on the Miller Analogies Test or 750 
on the Graduate Record Examination. For admission to 
the doctoral program, either a 44 on the MAT or 900 
on the GRE is expected. 

Requirements for the Master of Science — 
HPER Major (500 and 600 level) 

Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned undergraduate prerequisites of at least 18 
semester hours in HPERS professional courses or a bac- 
calaureate degree from an approved college in an area 
determined by the department chair to be related to the 
competencies required in the field of health, physical 
education, and recreation; 

2. complete 30 semester hours of academic work to in- 
clude REC 657, HLTH/REOPHED 661 , PHED 682, HLTH 
693, HLTH/PHED/REC 664 (3 hours required) with no 
more than 30 percent of the total degree hours dually 
listed as undergraduate/graduate hours; 



98 HPERS 



3. complete 6 semester hours of research tools or a foreign 
language on the undergraduate or graduate level; 

4. be assigned a thesis committee composed of two mem- 
bers, one of whom must be from the Department of 
HPERS; 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

6. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice); 

7. successfully complete an oral examination relating to the 
thesis. 

Candidate may incorporate 6 semester hours of designated 
cognate courses or a minor of 12 semester hours into the 
program. 

Non-Thesis Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned undergraduate prerequisites of at least 18 
semester hours in HPERS professional courses or a bac- 
calaureate degree from an approved college in an area 
determined by the department chair to be related to the 
competencies required in the field of health, physical 
education, and recreation; 

2. complete 32 semester hours to include no more than 30 
percent of the total degree hours dually listed as under- 
graduate/graduate hours; 

3. complete a major which includes a minimum of 20 se- 
mester hours with these specific courses required: REC 
657, REC/PHED/HLTH 661, PHED 682, and HLTH 693; 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

Candidate may incorporate 6 semester hours of designated 
cognate courses or a minor of 12 semester hours into the 
program. 

Concentration: Health 

Candidate must have earned appropriate undergraduate pre- 
requisites. 

Core Requirements (12 hours): 

REC 657 Issues, Trends, and Research in Recreation 
HLTH/PHED/ 

REC 661 Research Methods in HPERS 
PHED 682 Administration and Supervision of 

Physical Education 
HLTH 693 Principles and Philosophy of School Health 

Education Programs 

Health Electives (20 hours) 

To be selected in consultation with advisor. 

Concentration: Physical Education 
(NCATE Accredited) 

Candidate must have earned appropriate undergraduate pre- 
requisites. 

Core Requirements (12 hours): 

REC 657 Issues, Trends, and Research in Recreation 
HLTH/PHED/ 

REC 661 Research Methods in HPERS 
PHED 682 Administration and Supervision of Physical 
Education 



HLTH 693 Principles and Philosophy of School Health 
Education Programs 

Physical Education Requirement (20 hours): 

PHED 665 Physiological Bases of Human Performance 
PHED 683 Measurement in Exercise and Sport 
PHED 670 Data Analysis and Organization for 

Human Performance 
HLTH/PHED/ Independent Study in Health, Physical 

REC 691 Education, and Recreation 
FOED 602 Educational Foundations 
SPSE 643 Introduction to Curriculum Development 

Elect either: 

PHED 684 Advanced Principles of Exercise Prescription 

and Assessment 
HLTH 686 Program Planning for Health Promotion OR 
PHED 663 Philosophy and Principles of Human Performance 
PHED 680 Program Planning in Physical Education 

Concentration: Recreation 

Candidate must have earned appropriate undergraduate pre- 
requisites. 

Core Requirements (12 hours): 

REC 657 Issues, Trends, and Research in Recreation 
HLTH/PHED/ 

REC 661 Research Methods in HPERS 
PHED 682 Administration and Supervision of Physical 

Education 
HLTH 693 Principles and Philosophy of School Health 

Education Programs 

Recreation Electives (20 hours) 

To be selected in consultation with advisor 

Requirements for the Master of Science — 
Exercise Science and Health Promotion 
Major (500 and 600 level) 

Thesis Option: 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned undergraduate prerequisites of at least 1 8 
semester hours to include anatomy and physiology, ki- 
nesiology, exercise physiology, measurement and evalu- 
ation, exercise testing and prescription, and first aid and 
safety; 

2. complete 33 semester hours which includes the following 
courses: 

Required (21 hours) 

PHED 661 Research Methods in HPERS 

PHED 664 Thesis Research 

PHED 665 Physiological Bases of Human Performance 

PHED 683 Measurement in Exercise and Sports 

PHED 684 Advanced Principles of Exercise Prescription and 

Assessment 
PHED 688 Internship/Special Project In Exercise Science 

and Health Promotion 
PHED 670 Data Analysis and Organization for Human 

Performance 
Select two (6 hours) 
HLTH 600 Stress Management in Health and 

Health Promotion 
HLTH 686 Program Planning for Health Promotion 
HLTH 687 Health Promotion 
HLTH 695 Advanced Methods of Community Health 

Education 
HLTH 696 Health Dimensions 



HPERS 99 



Elective (6 hours) 

Select two graduate-level courses (500 or greater) from outside 
the department, in consultation with advisor 

3. be assigned a thesis committee composed of two mem- 
bers, one of whom must be from the Department of 
HPERS; 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

5. successfully complete written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice); 

6. successfully complete an oral examination relating to the 
thesis. 

Non-Thesis Option: 

Candidate must 

1. have earned undergraduate prerequisites of at least 18 
semester hours to include anatomy and physiology, ki- 
nesiology, exercise physiology, measurement and evalu- 
ation, exercise testing and prescription, and first aid and 
safety; 

2. complete 39 semester hours which includes the following 
courses: 

Required (27 hours) 

HLTH 687 Health Promotion 

PHED 661 Research Methods in HPERS 

PHED 665 Physiological Bases of Human Performance 

PHED 670 Data Analysis and Organization for Human 

Performance 
PHED 683 Measurement in Exercise and Sport 
PHED 684 Advanced Principles of Exercise Prescription and 

Assessment 
PHED 688 Internship/Special Project in Exercise Science 

and Health Promotion 
PHED 689 Seminar in Exercise Science and Health 

Promotion 
Select two (6 hours) 
HLTH 600 Stress Management in Health and 

Health Promotion 
HLTH 686 Program Planning for Health Promotion 
HLTH 695 Advanced Methods of Community Health 
HLTH 696 Health Dimensions 
Elective (6 hours) 

Select two graduate-level courses (500 or greater) from outside 
the department, in consultation with advisor 

3. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

4. successfully complete written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

Requirements for the Doctor of Arts 

in Physical Education (600 and 700 level) 

1 . Candidate must have earned 1 8 semester hours under- 
graduate and 20 semester hours at the master's level in 
professional HPER courses or related areas as determined 
by the department chair, D.A. graduate coordinator, and/ 
or major advisor. (Recommended courses; Physical Edu- 
cation Curriculum, Kinesiology, Foundations of Physical 
Education, Measurement and Evaluation, Physiology of 
Exercise, and Organization and Administration.) 

2. There are two alternatives: 
Alternative #1: 

48 semester hours above the master's level with at least 



two-thirds of the program on the 700 level. 500-level 
courses may not be applied. The major consists of at 
least 24 semester hours of coursework, excluding field 
work or laboratory experiment, plus 6 semester hours to 
include PHED 760, 761, 763, plus 6 semester hours for 
the dissertation. This program requires 1 2 hours in higher 
education. 
Alternative #2: 

Same as alternative #1 with the addition of 1 8 hours in 
a second teaching field (for example, HPERS with a con- 
centration in health or recreation); i.e., 60 semester hours 
above the master's level with at least two-thirds of the 
program on the 700 level. 500-level courses may not be 
applied. The major teaching field consists of at least 18 
semester hours of coursework in physical education, 
excluding field work or laboratory experiment, plus 6 
semester hours to include PHED 760, 761, 763, pre- 
dissertation seminar, plus 6 semester hours for the dis- 
sertation. The second teaching field consists of 18 se- 
mester hours of course work in any discipline that is of- 
fered as a major at the master's level. This program re- 
quires 12 hours in higher education. 

3. The core of professional education consists of at least 1 2 
semester hours, including FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 
754 and 755. 

4. A doctoral advisory committee must be appointed. 

5. Candidacy Form must be filed with the Graduate Office 
prior to the completion of 36 credit hours. 

6. Qualifying examinations as described on page 39 must 
be successfully completed. 

7. Dissertation, see guidelines page 39. 

8. Final examination, see guidelines page 40. 

Courses in Physical Education [PHED] 

524 Principles of Exercise Prescription and Assessment. Applica- 
tion of knowledge gained to practical situations; develop profi- 
ciency in using equipment and skills to evaluate an individual's 
health risks and fitness. 

534 Wellness and Healthy Lifestyles. Three credits. (Same as PHED 
and REG 534.) Developing healthy lifestyles through health ap- 
praisal, fitness evaluation, identification of cardiovascular risk 
factors, and individual exercise prescriptions. 

560 Technology Applications. One credit. (Same as HLTH and REG 
560.) Prerequisite: Introductory course in computer literacy or 
equivalent with instructor permission. Gorequisite: 560L. Fo- 
cus on understanding of and competency in use of variety of 
technology applications related to the profession. Students will 
be required to enroll in the corresponding lab during the same 
semester. 

5601 Technology Applications Lab. Two credits. (Same as HLTH and 
REG S60L.) Laboratory course to accompany 560. 

570 Skills and Techniques of Teaching Rhythmic Activities. Two 

credits. (Same as DANG 570.) Various dance forms, methods 
and materials, evaluative procedures, and experiences in teach- 
ing all forms of dance to students at the K-1 2 level. 

581 Directing Intramural. Two credits. The organization and admin- 
istration of intramural programs. Actual participation in devel- 
oping and supervising intramural activities. 



100 HPERS 



591 Kinesiology. Three credits. The science of human motion. Em- 
phasis on principles of anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of 
human activity. 

592 Special Problems. One, two, or three credits. (Same and HLTH 
and REC 592.) Presentation and discussion of research work in 
physical education, recreation, health and safety education, or 
athletics. (A maximum of three semester hours may be applied 
toward a degree.) 

595 Adaptive Physical Education. Three credits. Principles of plan- 
ning and conducting physical education in order to provide for 
the special needs, interests, and abilities of exceptional students. 
Field work in local schools and community agencies. 

650 Legal Issues and Risk Management in Physical Education, 
Sport and Leisure Services. Three credits. (Same as REC 650.) 
Understanding the legal basis for management actions, concepts 
of legal liability including torts and contracts as applied to physical 
education, sport, and leisure services organizations. Emphasis 
on the ability to plan, develop, and implement risk manage- 
ment programs. 

661 Research Methods in HPERS. Three credits. (Same as HLTH 
and REC 661 .) Location of information, methods of research, 
methods of collecting data, application of the computer in ana- 
lyzing data, preparation and presentation of a research paper. 

663 Philosophy and Principles of Human Performance. Three cred- 
its. The philosophic basis of human performance and the scien- 
tific principles which provide a base for the development of 
sound programs. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. (Same as HLTH and REC 
664.) Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent lit- 
erature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. 
Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit 
hour of master's research each semester until completion. S/U 
grading. 

665 Physiological Bases of Human Performance. Three credits. The 
influence of physiological variations upon exercise, including 
research techniques related to work physiology and critical analy- 
sis of research literature in this area. 

670 Data Analysis and Organization for Human Performance. 

Three credits. (Same as HLTH and REC 670.) Prerequisites: PHED 
481 or equivalent, good understanding of mathematical con- 
cepts, and computer literacy. Pertinent skills needed to analyze 
and organize research data through introduction of concepts, 
principles, techniques, and activities that will lead to the appro- 
priate organization and analysis of research data collected for 
health and human performance. 

680 Program Planning in Physical Education. Three credits. Mod- 
ern programs of physical education for all grade levels and the 
contribution of activities to the goals of education. 

682 Administration and Supervision of Physical Education. Three 
credits. The organization, planning, and functions involved in 
administering and supervising programs of physical education. 

683 Measurement in Exercise and Sport. Three credits. Measure- 
ment theory related to reliability, objectivity, and validity, with 
application to real world testing situations in the field of health 
and human performance. Practical experience of testing through 
labs and/or a research project, including computer analysis and 
interpretation of reliability and validity data. 



684 Advanced Principles of Exercise Prescription and Assessment. 

Three credits. Prerequisite: PHED 424 or equivalent. Provides 
theoretical and laboratory learning experiences for health risk 
appraisal, cardiovascular evaluation, and exercise prescription 
for healthy people and cardiac rehabilitation patients. 

688 Internship/Special Project in Exercise Science and Health Pro- 
motion. Three to six credits. On-site practical experience in an 
exercise science/health promotion program. Those with exten- 
sive work experience will be expected to develop, implement, 
and conclude a project (research or applied) in consultation with 
the major professor. 

689 Seminar in Exercise Science and Health Promotion. Three cred- 
its. Current issues and research in exercise science and health 
promotion. Written and oral presentation of a research project 

required. 

691 Independent Study in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion. One, two, or three credits. (Same as HLTH and REC 691.) 
Individual study of current problems or areas of interest. 

700 Adapted Physical Activity. Three credits. Cognitive, neuromus- 
cular, sensory, and orthopedic impairments; identification of 
current topics and procedures for testing and programming for 
individuals with disabilities; current research findings and prac- 
tices to assist students in developing necessary skills to design 
and implement appropriate physical activity programs for indi- 
viduals with disabilities. 

701 Analysis and Criticism of Professional Literature. Three cred- 
its. Thorough consideration of selected specialized literature most 
likely to influence physical education programs, procedures, and 
practices in the school and community. 

702 College Physical Education Administration. Three credits. Pro- 
viding administrators and professional students in the field with 
a broad base of workable administrative principles and guides. 

703 Research Seminar in Human Performance. Three credits. Cur- 
rent problems, issues, trends, and research in human perform- 
ance; selected lectures, reports, and class discussion. 

704 History of Physical Education. Three credits. The role of physi- 
cal activity in the lives of people from antiquity to the present 
with an emphasis upon the major events, movements, and 
people that have influenced the development of physical edu- 
cation. 

705 Facilities and Equipment for Physical Education. Three cred- 
its. The planning of areas and facilities related to physical edu- 
cation and athletics. 

706 Field Work or Laboratory Experiment in Physical Education. 

One to six credits. Professional assignments in physical educa- 
tion appropriate to the student's background and interests will 
be pursued for the semester. 

708 Professional Preparation in Human Performance. Three cred- 
its. Comparisons of current programs and trends; the develop- 
ment of individual programs. 

709 Motor Learning in Physical Education. Three credits. The theo- 
ries of learning as they relate to the acquisition of motor skills; a 
review of the literature pertaining to motor skill development 
and the implications for teaching. 

710 Mechanical Analysis of Sports Skills. Three credits. A synthesis 
of scientific principles as they relate to teaching simple and com- 
plex motor patterns. 



HPERS 101 



760/ Teaching Practicum in Human Performance. Two credits. Care- 
761 ful supervision given to actual teaching experience. Assignment 
by department or chair of candidate's committee. 

763 Pre-Dissertation Seminar. Two credits. Prerequisites: HLTH/ 
PHED/REC 661 and 670 or equivalent. Gives doctoral students 
an opportunity to discuss the process of conducting dissertation 
and issues concerning research at the university. Grant writing 
also addressed. 

764 Dissertation Research. One to six credits. Assignment by depart- 
ment or chair of candidate's committee. Selection of a research 
problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis 
of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, stu- 
dent should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral re- 
search each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

770 Advanced Data Analysis and Organization for Human Per- 
formance. Three credits. Prerequisites: HLTH/PHED/REC 661 
and 670 or equivalent. Skills and understanding necessary to 
read, conduct, report, and interpret advanced data analytical 
techniques using data from HPER. Practical and written assign- 
ments, presentations, examinations, and projects will furnish 
doctoral student with tools necessary for data analysis associ- 
ated with dissertation requirement. 

771 Experimental Design in Human Performance. Three credits. 
Prerequisites: HLTH/PHED/REC 661, 670, and 770 or equiva- 
lent. Skills and understanding necessary to evaluate designs used 
in HPER research literature. Practical and written assignments, 
evaluation of current research, examinations, and projects; 
knowledge and skills for planning appropriately the design for 
future research projects. 

Courses in Health [HLTH] 

527 Current Health Issues. Three credits. An analysis of current is- 
sues, problems, needs, trends, and interests in health educa- 
tion. 

528 Instructor Course: First Aid and CPR. Two credits. Prerequi- 
site: HLTH 330 or current American Red Cross certification in 
multimedia first aid or standard first aid and CPR. Organizing, 
planning, and teaching American Red Cross safety courses. Red 
Cross instructor certification awarded for successful completion. 

529 Corrective Therapy-Clinical Training Program. Nine credits. 
Orientation, observation, and practice in the methods and tech- 
niques of medical rehabilitation and application of physical 
education principles to the treatment of illness and injury. The 
student-trainee program is affiliated with the Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital, Murfreesboro; training is designed to offer 
majors preparation to work as therapists in medical treatment 
programs. 

531 Health Problems of Exceptional Children. Three credits. Com- 
mon health problems with emphasis on those peculiar to chil- 
dren in various areas of exceptionality. Consideration given to 
identification and referral. 

534 Wellness and Healthy Lifestyles. Three credits. (Same as PHED 
and REC 534.) Developing healthy lifestyles through health ap- 

i pralsal, fitness evaluation, identification of cardiovascular risk 
factors, and individual exercise prescriptions. 

560 Technology Applications. One credit. (Same as PHED and REC 
560.) Prerequisite: Introductory course in computer literacy or 
equivalent with instructor permission. Corequisite: 560L. Fo- 
cus on understanding of and competency in use of variety of 



technology applications related to the profession. Students will 
be required to enroll in the corresponding lab during the same 
semester. 

560L Technology Applications Lab. Two credits. (Same as PHED and 
REC 560L.) Laboratory course to accompany 560. 

590 Certifled Health Education Specialist (CHES) Review. One 

credit. Responsibilities and competencies on the Certified Health 
Education Specialist examination. 

592 Special Problems. One, two, or three credits. (Same as PHED 
and REC 592.) Presentation and discussion of research work in 
physical education, recreation, health and safety education, or 
athletics. (A maximum of three semester hours may be applied 
toward a degree.) 

600 Stress Management in Health and Health Promotion. Three 
credits. Evaluation techniques and instruments considered. Ef- 
fects of stress on physical and mental domains of health exam- 
ined. Methods of conducting stress management workshops and 
classes emphasized. 

601 Holistic and Complementary Health Care. Three credits. Con- 
cepts and theories that make up the disciplines and practices 
constituting the holistic and complementary approach to health 
promotion and disease treatment and prevention. 

610 Health Education and Behavior. Three credits. Links behav- 
ioral change to practical application in the design and imple- 
mentation of individual and group programs in health educa- 
tion and behavior. 

661 Research Methods in HPERS. Three credits. (Same as PHED 
and REC 661 .) Location of information, methods of research, 
methods of collecting data, application of the computer in ana- 
lyzing data, preparation and presentation of a research paper. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. (Same as PHED and REC 
664.) Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent lit- 
erature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. 
Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit 
hour of master's research each semester until completion. S/U 
grading. 

670 Data Analysis and Organization for Human Performance. 

Three credits. (Same as PHED and REC 670.) Prerequisites: PHED 
481 or equivalent, good understanding of mathematical con- 
cepts, and computer literacy. Pertinent skills needed to analyze 
and organize research data through introduction of concepts, 
principles, techniques, and activities that will lead to the appro- 
priate organization and analysis of research data collected for 
health and human performance. 

685 Methods in Epidemiology. Three credits. Principles and meth- 
ods of epidemiologic analysis including standardization; strati- 
fied analysis; confounding and Its control; planning and con- 
ducting epidemiologic research; role of multivariate analysis In 
epidemiologic research. 

686 Program Planning for Health Promotion. Three credits. Needs 
assessment, missions, goals, and objectives of health promotion 
program. Program planning, implementation, and evaluation 
covered in detail. 

687 Health Promotion. Three credits. Health promotion knowledge 
as well as the ability to impart this knowledge to the lay popula- 
tion. In-depth information will be covered regarding lifestyle 
and its relationship to risk factors for cardiovascular disease and 
cancer. 



102 HPERS 



691 Independent Study in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion. One, two, or three credits. (Same as PHED and REC 691 .) 
Individual study of current problems or areas of interest. 

693 Principles and Philosophy of School Health Education Pro- 
grams. Three credits. A detailed overview. 

695 Advanced Methods of Community Health Education. Three 
credits. Designed for health educators, classroom teachers, physi- 
cal educators, administrators, and others interested in methods 
and procedures of community health education. 

696 Health Dimensions. Three credits. Advanced content for teach- 
ers of personal and community health; designed for up-dating 
professional preparation and for gaining additional in-depth 
basics utilized in curriculum planning, teaching, public service, 
and research by school health educators. 

697 Advanced Methods in Human Sexuality Education. Three cred- 
its. Methodology, teaching techniques, and the organization of 
sexuality education programs for schools (K-1 2) and other com- 
munity settings. Additional emphasis directed to concepts and 
information about human sexuality education, i.e. the psycho- 
logical, physiological, sociological, and ethical aspects. 

712 Research in Epidemiology. Three credits. Advanced study in 
epidemiological analysis, methods, and critique with an em- 
phasis within the field of health and human performance. Areas 
include epidemiology and chronic disease, public health, exer- 
cise science, and sports medicine. 

Courses In Athletic Coaching [ATHC] 

506 Sport Psychology. Three credits. Application of the knowledge 
base of psychology to the human endeavors of athletics. Intro- 
duction of behavioral principles, motivational research, person- 
ality factors, social/psychological findings, cognitive processes, 
dysfunctional behavior knowledge, and psychometric assessment 
procedures for the purpose of enhancing performance. 

518 Coaching Speed/Strength Conditioning for Sports. Three cred- 
its. Organizing and developing speed and strength conditioning 
programs for sports. Setting up and supervising proper methods 
and techniques in running, weight lifting, and conditioning ex- 
ercise for athletics today. 

522 Coaching Soccer. Two credits. Theory and practice of soccer 
fundamentals as well as introduction of offensive and defensive 
plays. 

560 Advanced Coaching of Football. Two credits. Philosophies of 
coaching football and close examination of the master plan of 
coaching responsibilities. 

562 Advanced Coaching of Basketball. Two credits. Philosophies 
of coaching basketball discussed, along with a detailed study of 
the master plan of coaching responsibilities. 

564 Coaching of Baseball. Two credits. Theory and practice in base- 
ball fundamentals as well as reviewing the various systems and 
types of plays. 

565 Coaching Cross Country, Track and Field. Two credits. Theory 
and practice in fundamentals and skills. 

568 Coaching and Judging Women's Gymnastics. Three credits. 
Includes classroom instruction and practical experience in prin- 
ciples and techniques of coaching, spotting, and judging 
women's gymnastics; a USGF Judges Rating may be obtained. 



569 Psychology of Coaching. Three credits. Application of basic psy- 
chological principles to everyday coaching situations and prob- 
lems. Designed to improve communication and motivation for 
players and coaches. 

580 Administration of High School and College Athletics. Three 
credits. National, state, and local policies concerning athletic 
eligibility, contest management, equipment, awards, finances, 
budgets, safety, maintenance of facilities, public relations, pub- 
licity, and current athletic trends. 

Courses in Athletic Training [ATHT] 

561 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. Three credits. Theory 
and practice in the prevention and care of athletic injuries in- 
cluding treatment, taping, and rehabilitation. 

596 Rehabilitation Techniques in Sports Medicine. Three credits. 
Methods and techniques in the selection and application. The 
N.A.T.A. Competencies in Athletic Training will be a guideline 
for knowledge that each student should obtain. Students will 
engage in the process of reviewing, analyzing, discussing, and 
reflecting about athletic training. 

597 Therapeutic Modalities in Sports Medicine. Three credits. 
Methods and techniques in the application of selected thera- 
peutic modalities and the evaluation of injuries relative to mo- 
dalities. The N.A.T.A. Competencies in Athletic Training will be a 
guideline for knowledge that each student should obtain. Stu- 
dents will engage in the process of reviewing, analyzing, dis- 
cussing, synthesizing, and reflecting about athletic training. 

Courses in Dance [DANC] 

516 Advanced Ballet - Individual Study, Solo and Ensemble 
Performance. Three credits. Refine and polish ballet skills at I 
the advanced level leading to performance in classical and 
contemporary styles. 

51 7 Advanced Ballet - Individual Study and Choreography. Three 
credits. Concentrates on choreography for solo and ensemble 
performance In both classical and contemporary styles. 

544 Dance Therapy. Three credits. The use of movement in helping 
to reduce physiological, psychological, and sociological aberra- 
tions. Designed to help the classroom teacher or specialist work- 
ing with children who have these problems. 

570 Skills and Techniques of Teaching Rhythmic Activities. Two 

credits. (Same as PHED 570.) Various dance forms, methods 
and materials, evaluative procedures, and experiences in teach- 
ing all forms of dance to students at the K-1 2 level. 

573 Dance for the Theatre. Three credits. Prerequisites: PHED 1 01, 
102, 216, 218, and 219 or equivalent. Techniques of dance for 
musicals, comedies, opera, television, and stage and choreog- 
raphy for these forms. 

574 A, B DanceProduction. One credit. All aspects of concert plan- 
ning and production as performer and crew member. May be 
taken for two semesters. 

575 Choreography. Three credits. Prerequisite: PHED 208 or equiva- 
lent. Exploration of movement, technique sequences, and cho- 
reographic forms; basic elements of labanotation. 

576 Choreographic Project. Three credits. Exploration of choreo- 
graphic techniques to develop an original group dance and thei 
execution of plans for costumes, lighting, and makeup. 



HPERS 103 



577 Advanced Modern Dance. Three credits. Prerequisite: PHED 
208 or equivalent. Techniques, choreography, and various as- 
pects of labanotation for the experienced dancer and choreog- 
rapher. 

Courses in Recreation [REC] 

534 Wellness and Healthy Lifestyles. Three credits. (Same as HLTH 
and PHED 534.) Developing healthy lifestyles through health 
appraisal, fitness evaluation identification of cardiovascular risk 
factors, and individual exercise prescriptions. 

538 Introduction to Recreation for Persons with Disability. Three 
credits. Introduces important issues such as advocacy, accessi- 
bility, legalities, and the importance of and broad range of op- 
portunities in the provision of recreational services for persons 
with disability in our society. 

548 Recreational Therapy Techniques. Three credits. Activity-based 
therapeutic interventions currently utilized to alleviate existing 
problems, maintain current level of functioning, or to assist in 
overall rehabilitation efforts of transdisciplinary treatment team. 

549 Campus Recreation. Three credits. For those wishing to acquaint 
a specific and comprehensive knowledge of the recreational 
sports program and an understanding of its place and value in 
education and society. 

550 Introduction to Recreational Therapy. Three credits. Explores 
the profession of recreational therapy, the wide range of dis- 
abilities, and the role of intervention in a variety of settings: 
clinical, community, and transitional. History, philosophy, pro- 
fessional development/certification, systemic program design, 
and implementation are the major issues. 

551 Recreational Therapy in Clinical Settings. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: REC 250 and 450. Includes working with persons 
with TBI, SCI, and other traumatic injury or disease. Medical 
terminology related to disease and disability, holistic approach, 
interdisciplinary treatment, assessment, documentation, third 
party reimbursement, and evaluation explored. 

552 Transitional and Community Recreational Therapy. Three cred- 
its. Issues, needs, and opportunities in the facilitation of transi- 
tional and community-based recreational therapy services; rel- 
evance to current health care trends. 

554 Organization and Administration of Recreation. Three cred- 
its. Duties and responsibilities of an administrator; developing 
the ability to perform these in a recreational setting. 

556 Field Studies in Recreation and Parks. Three credits. Prerequi- 
sites: REC 250 and 353. Provides an opportunity for supervised 
practical application of classroom theory in professional field 
work. 

557 Outdoor Recreation Workshop. Three credits. An off-campus 
course that provides materials and experiences not available in 
the classroom. Exposure to resource management, campground 

r planning, problem solving, canoeing, kayaking, sailing, envir- 

onmental education, and other areas. 

558 Seminar: Outdoor Recreation and Environmental Issues. Three 
credits. Awareness of the importance of environmental consid- 
eration when planning, managing, or administering outdoor 
recreation programs. Includes environmental issues and meth- 
ods of seeking solutions to environmental problems. 



559 Readings in Parks and Recreation. Three credits. In-depth read- 
ing in the field; preparation of an annotated bibliography and 
report. Arrangements for this course should be made with the 
instructor prior to registration. 

560 Technology Applications. One credit. (Same as HLTH and PHED 
560.) Prerequisite: Introductory course in computer literacy or 
equivalent with instructor permission. Corequisite: 560L. Fo- 
cus on understanding of and competency in use of variety of 
technology applications related to the profession. Students will 
be required to enroll in the corresponding lab during the same 
semester. 

560L Technology Applications Lab. Two credits. (Same as HLTH and 
PHED 560L.) Laboratory course to accompany 560. 

566 Recreation Program Evaluation. Three credits. Applicable evalu- 
ation procedures and techniques. Emphasis on specification of 
objectives, development of recording procedures, and experi- 
mental analysis. 

579 Sport and Society. Three credits. (Same as SOC 579.) A behav- 
ioral approach to the sport and leisure phenomena from the 
related perspectives of sociology and anthropology. 

592 Special Problems. One, two, or three credits. (Same as PHED 

and HLTH 592.) Presentation and discussion of research work 
in physical education, recreation, health and safety education, 
or athletics. (A maximum of three semester hours may be ap- 
plied toward a degree.) 

650 Legal Issues and Risk Management in Physical Education, 
Sport and Leisure Services. Three credits. (Same as PHED 650.) 
Understanding the legal basis for management actions, concepts 
of legal liability including torts and contracts as applied to physical 
education, sport, and leisure services organizations. Emphasis 
on the ability to plan, develop, and implement risk manage- 
ment programs. 

652 Management Practices in Recreation and Leisure. Three cred- 
its. An analysis of administrative processes and management tech- 
niques used in planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and con- 
trolling with respect to leisure service delivery systems. 

653 Principles and Practices in Recreation and Leisure. Three cred- 
its. Identification of principles and practices applicable to a va- 
riety of opportunities in public, private, institutional, and indus- 
trial recreation. 

655 Outdoor Environmental Education. Three credits. Camping 
leadership and outdoor education principles with implications 
for management, planning of, and interpretation in recreation 
areas as well as for policy development. 

657 Issues, Trends, and Research in Recreation. Three credits. Iden- 
tification and analysis. Emphasis on meaningful, outstanding 
studies and research in the field of recreation. 

661 Research Methods in HPERS. Three credits. (Same as HLTH 
and PHED 661 .) Location of information, methods of research, 
methods of collecting data, application of the computer in ana- 
lyzing data, preparation and presentation of a research paper. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. (Same as HLTH and PHED 
664.) Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent lit- 
erature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. 
Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit 
hour of master's research each semester until completion. S/U 
grading. 



104 



667 Behavioral Concepts in Recreation and Leisure Services. Three 
credits. Social psychological concepts concerning recreation and 
leisure behavior in various types of park, recreation, and tour- 
ism settings. Introduction to and an overview of a range of dif- 
ferent theoretical perspectives and behavioral concepts under- 
lying pertinent research. 

670 Data Analysis and Organization for Human Performance. 

Three credits. {Same as HLTH and PHED 670.) Prerequisites: 
PHED 481 or equivalent, good understanding of mathematical 
concepts, and computer literacy. Pertinent skills needed to ana- 
lyze and organize research data through introduction of con- 
cepts, principles, techniques, and artivities that will lead to the 
appropriate organization and analysis of research data collected 
for health and human performance. 

691 Independent Study in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion. One, two, or three credits. (Same as HLTH and PHED 691 .) 
Individual study of current problems or areas of interest. 



Courses in Safety [SAFE] 



532 Principles of Accident Control. Three credits. Principles, con- 
cepts, and methodology of the safety movement. Introductory 
experiences dealing with accident prevention as well as control 
efforts recommended by various social institutions and agen- 
cies reviewed. 

535 Automotive Transportation Safety Programs. Three credits. 
Federal, state, and local legislation concerning transportation 
control and design. 

585 Driver and Traffic Safety Fundamentals. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: Valid driver's license. Introdurtion to the field of driver 
and traffic safety education. Primary focus is on current con- 
cepts related to safe driving. 

587 Teaching Driver and Traffic Safety. Three credits. Prerequisite: 

SAFE 485 or 585. Designed to develop teaching techniques for 
laboratory instruction including on-street, driving simulator, and 
multiple-car range programs. 

641 Administration and Supervision of Safety Programs in Schools 
and Colleges. Three credits. An overview of the total program 
administration through analysis of tasks, strategies, and situational 
factors affecting them; examines handicaps to safety pro- 
gramming, needed change, and methods for implementation. 

645 Field Practice in Safety Education. Three credits. Professional 
assignment under supervision of one or more safety educators 
or agency directors in school or community organizations. 

647 Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Care Systems. Three 
credits. Major elements involved in disasters and emergencies, 
preparedness planning, systems utilization, and attention to 
essential human services, with emphasis on community action. 

692 School Safety and Safety Education. Three credits. School safety 
education concepts in all disciplines and levels, including con- 
tent, methodology, and teacher liability. 



Department of 
History 



Thaddeus Smith, Chair 
Peck Hall 223 

The History Department offers the Master of Arts with 
a major in history. Master of Arts with a concentration 
in Public History, Doctor of Arts with a major in history, 
Doctor of Arts with a concentration in Historic Preser- 
vation, and a graduate minor. 

Normally a score of 900 (verbal and analytical portions) 
on the Graduate Record Examination is required for 
admission to the master's programs. For admission to 
the doctoral programs, a CRE of 1000 (verbal and ana- 
lytical portions) is expected. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts — 
History Major (500 and 600 levels only) 

Admission to the program requires 

1 . an earned bachelor's degree from an accredited univer- 
sity or college; 

2. at least a 2.75 grade point average in all college work 
taken; 

3. completion of at least 1 8 semester hours of undergradu- 
ate history courses; 

Modifications to the above requirements may be made with 
the permission of the department's director of graduate studies 
and the Department's Graduate Committee. 

Once admitted to the program, candidate must 

1. complete 30 hours of graduate history courses with at 
least 70 percent of the hours to be taken at the 600 level. 
The 30 hours include: 

a. core seminar courses 

HIST 607 Historical Inquiry 

HIST 608 Seminar in Historical Discourse 

HIST 609 Selected Readings in History 

b. 9 to 1 2 hours of graduate courses in a thesis field: American 
or European history; 

c. 6 to 9 hours of graduate courses (at least one course being ai 
the 600 level) in courses outside the thesis field; 

d. HIST 664 Thesis Research (at least 3 hours) 

2. complete comprehensive examinations in the thesis field; 
NOTE: Students may add a field outside of history towards theii 
master's program. Specific provisions on graduate minors are else 
where in this catalog. 

3. maintain satisfactory progress towards completion of the 
degree each semester; 

4. fulfill a foreign language requirement by: 

a. completing 12 undergraduate semester hours in one laiv 
guage; 

b. earning a grade of A or B in GERM 321 or FREN 321 ; 



History 105 



c. earning at least a C in any upper-division undergraduate for- 
eign language course taught in the language and requiring 
translation; 

d. passing a reading examination in the language administered 
by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 semester hours; 

6. submit an acceptable thesis. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts with 
a Concentration in Public History 
(500 and 600 levels only) 

The Public History program offers specialized education in 
one of three tracks; historic preservation, museums, and cul- 
tural resources. Each track consists of a thematic seminar, a 
local practicum, and an internship off campus. 

Admission to the program requires 

1 . an earned bachelor's degree from an accredited univer- 
sity or college; 

2. at least a 2.75 grade point average in all college work; 

3. completion of at least 1 8 semester hours of undergradu- 
ate history courses. 

Modifications to these above requirements may be made with 
the permission of the department's director of graduate studies 
and the Department's Graduate Committee. 

Once admitted to the program, candidate must 

1. complete at least 36 semester hours of graduate-level 
history and public history courses, with at least 70 per- 
cent of the hours to be taken at the 600 level. The 36 
hours include 

a. core seminar courses 

HIST 607 Historical Inquiry 

HIST 608 Seminar in Historical Discourse 

HIST 609 Selected Readings in History 

b. Public History courses 

HIST 585 Introduction to Public History 
HIST 605 Public History Internship 
HIST 606 Public History Practicum 

c. Public History seminar option (3 hours) 

HIST 685 Seminar in Historic Preservation OR 
HIST 688 Museum Seminar OR 
HIST 689 Cultural Resources Seminar 

d. Public History electives (6 hours) selected in consultation with 
the public history director; 

e. history electives (6 hours) outside the public history field (at 
least 3 hours of which must be at the 600 level); 

f. HIST 664 Thesis Research (at least 3 hours) 

2. fulfill a foreign language requirement in the same man- 
ner as stipulated for the Master of Arts-History Major, or 
complete HIST 500 Computer and Quantitative History; 

3. maintain satisfactory progress towards completion of the 
degree each semester. 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office before 
the completion of 24 semester hours; 

5. complete comprehensive examinations in the field of 
public history, that field to include an examination in the 
area of American history in which the student will com- 
plete the thesis; 

6. submit an acceptable thesis. 



Requirements for the Doctor of Arts — 
History Major (500*, 600, 700 levels only) 

Candidate must 

1 . hold a master's degree and have earned at least 18 se- 
mester hours of undergraduate history credit and a mini- 
mum of 20 semester hours of graduate history credit. 
Deficiencies in this requirement should be removed dur- 
ing the first year in the program; 

2. have three years of appropriate teaching and/or admin- 
istrative educational experience; 

3. select one of the following programs: 
Alternative #1 

Complete a minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate 
courses beyond the master's level, at least 24 of which 
must be at the 700 level and no more than 1 5 may be at 
the 500 level (with prior approval*), including 

a. at least 24 semester hours of graduate history courses; 

b. 6 semester hours of teaching internship; 

c. 6 semester hours of dissertation research and writing; 

d. 12 semester hours of professional education classes consist- 
ing of FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

At least 24 semester hours of the above must be taken at 

the 700 level. 

Alternative #2 

Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of courses 

above the master's level, including 

a. at least 1 8 semester hours of graduate history courses; 

b. at least 18 semester hours in any other academic discipline 
for which MTSU offers a master's or higher degree; 

c. 6 semester hours of internship; 

d. 6 semester hours of dissertation research and writing; 

e. 12 semester hours of professional education classes consist- 
ing of FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

At least two-thirds of the above hours must be taken at 
the 700 level. 

4. consult with an advisory committee during the first se- 
mester in the program to ensure the student's course 
work will adequately prepare him or her for successfully 
completing oral and written examinations in three fields: 
Alternative #1 

a. United States History 

b. Western Civilization (either before or since 1 71 5) 

c. Higher Education 
Alternative #2 

A program determined by the student in consultation with the 
advisory committee 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours. 

6. maintain satisfactory progress towards completion of the 
degree each semester; 

7. successfully complete written and oral examinations in 
1) history and 2) higher education; 

8. develop and successfully defend a dissertation prospectus; 

9. complete a dissertation and successfully defend it in a 
final oral examination. 



L 



106 History 



Requirements for the 
Doctor of Arts in History with a 
Concentration in Historic Preservation 
(500*, 600, and 700 levels only) 

Candidate must 

1 . hold a master's degree and have earned at least 1 8 se- 
mester hours of undergraduate history credit and a mini- 
mum of 20 semester hours of graduate history credit. 
Deficiencies in this requirement should be removed dur- 
ing the first year in the program; 

2. complete from 48 to 60 semester hours of history and 
professional education courses above the master's level, 
including 

a. at least 24 semester hours of graduate history courses; 

b. 6 semester hours of internship (HIST 760 and 761); 

c. 6 semester hours of dissertation research and writing; 

d. 12 semester hours of professional education courses consist- 
ing of FOED 752 and 756 and SPSE 754 and 755. 

At least two-thirds of the above must be taken at the 700 
level. 

3. complete a skills/tool cognate of 1 2 semester hours cho- 
sen in consultation with student's advisor and the pro- 
gram director; 

4. consult with an advisory committee during their first se- 
mester in the program. Each student's program will in- 
clude course work in the fields 1) historic preservation 
theory, 2) applied practice in historic preservation, and 
3) United States history. The advisory committee will as- 
sist the student in selecting courses to satisfy these field 
requirements; 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

6. maintain satisfactory progress towards completion of the 
degree each semester; 

7. successfully complete written and oral examinations in 
1) history, 2) historic preservation, and 3) higher educa- 
tion; 

8. develop and successfully defend a dissertation prospectus; 

9. complete a dissertation and successfully defend it in a 
final oral examination. 

10. requires prior approval*. 



Courses in History [HIST] 




500 Computer and Quantitative History. Three credits. Examines 
quantitative reasoning in historical research. Covers historio- 
graphical questions and practical research skills. Includes histor- 
ical causality, historical change over time, data preparation, sam- 
pling, and the interpretation of quantitative data. 

501 Europe: The Renaissance and Reformation. Three credits. Euro- 
pean developments occurring in art, literature, religion, and sci- 
ence. The influence exerted by these on political and economic 
history from about 1 300 to 1 600. 

502 Europe: The French Revolution and Napoleon. Three credits. 
The social, political, and economic aspects of the old regime, 
the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic period in European 
history. 

503 Europe: Absolutism and Enlightenment. Three credits. Euro- 
pean history in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, cov- 
ering social, economic, intellectual, and political developments. 

504 Renaissance Europe. Three credits. Survey of political, eco- 
nomic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments of Italy, 
France, England, Germany, and the Low Countries during the 
fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. 

505 Reformation Europe. Three credits. Survey of political, eco- 
nomic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments of Italy, 
France, England, Germany, and the Low Countries during the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

506 Environmental History. Three credits. Traces environmental 
change in America from the Puritans to the present and from 
wilderness to suburbia. Explains impact of growth, settlement, 
and resource exploitation on our national landscape and insti- 
tutions. 

508 Japan. Three credits. Survey of Japanese history from the forma- 
tion of the first Japanese political state to the country's emer- 
gence as a post-World War II economic superpower. 

509 China. Three credits. Survey of Chinese history from antiquity 
to the present People's Republic, stressing social history and the 
unique cultural features defining China's civilization. 

510 The Medieval Mediterranean World. Three credits. A regional 
survey of political, economic, social and intellectual, and cultural 
development of the countries bordering the Mediterranean. 

511 Colonial America. Three credits. The exploration and 
colonialization of North America, relations between Indians and 
Europeans, and the development of colonial societies and iden- 
tity from 1492 to 1760. 

512 Early National United States, 1763-1815. Three credits. Ex- 
amines international conflicts from the Seven Years' War through 
the War of 1812, while emphasizing political, social, intellec- 
tual, and economic developments in the new United States. 

51 3 The United States: The Jacksonian Era. Three credits. The major 
political, social, and economic developments in the awakening 
of American nationalism, Jacksonian Democracy, expansionism, 
and the Mexican War. 

514 Civil War and Reconstruction. Three credits. Sectional differ- 
ences of the 1850s. Civil War. Reconstruction, and the Grant 
Era. 



History 107 



51 5 The Emergence of Modern America. Three credits. The nature 
and consequences of the shift of the United States from an agrar- 
ian to an urban and industrialized society between Reconstruc- 
tion and World War I. 

51 6 United States, 1914-1945. Three credits. The increasing involve- 
ment of the United States in world affairs from World War I 
through World War II and of the social and political conse- 
quences of economic complexity which resulted in prosperity, 
depression, and the New Deal. 

51 7 The United States Since World War II. Three credits. The ma- 
jor social, political, economic, and diplomatic developments in 
the history of the United States from 1945 to the present with 
particular emphasis on the role of the United States in world 
affairs and the changing role of government. 

518 Problems in Modern Middle East. Three credits. A detailed 
analysis of selected historical controversies. Topics will vary from 
year to year. 

51 9 Britain in the Nineteenth Century. Three credits. Survey of Brit- 
ish political, economic, diplomatic, military, and cultural devel- 
opments from the end of the Napoleonic era to Gladstone's 
retirement in 1894. 

520 Britain in the Twentieth Century. Three credits. The political 
military, imperial, economic, and social history of a changing 
Britain in its century of total war, imperial decline, and eco- 
nomic readjustment. 

521 Colonial Latin America. Three credits. The indigenous societ- 
ies present before European colonization and the first encoun- 
ters in Mexico, the Caribbean, and South America. Analysis of 
political structures imposed by the Spanish as well as the social 
and cultural implications of colonialism and miscegenation. 

522 Modern Latin America. Three credits. Examination of colonial 
background of Latin America, moving to an exploration of eco- 
nomic, political, social, and cultural developments in Latin 
America since Independence. 

524 Latin American-United States Relations. Three credits. Rela- 
tions between the United States and Latin America in the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on the effect of 
cultural differences on inter-American diplomacy. 

525 Mexico and the Caribbean. Three credits. The development of 
cultural, economic, and political traditions since 1492. 

526 South America. Three credits. The development of cultural, eco- 
nomic, and political traditions since 1492. 

527A Women in America to 1890. Three credits. Examines women's 
roles in the United States from colonial times to 1890, empha- 
sizing the experiences of women of different classes, races, and 
ethnic groups with work, family, and politics. 

5278 Women in America Since 1890. Three credits. Examines 
women's roles in the United States since 1 890, emphasizing the 
experiences of women in different classes, races, and ethnic 
groups with work, family, and politics. 

528 The Sunbelt: Its Background and History. Three credits. The 
Southern rim of states from a nineteenth-century American out- 
post to the modern pace-setting position in economics, culture, 
racial relationships, and politics with such leaders as King, Nixon, 
Carter, and Reagan. 



529 Women in Europe Since 1 700. Three credits. A comparative 
study of the social, intellectual, cultural, political, and economic 
history of women's lives in Great Britain, France, Germany, and 
Russia since 1 700. 

529A History of Women in the Third World. Three credits. Exam- 
ines the connections between modern colonialism and the de- 
velopment of third-world feminisms. First focuses on conquest 
and colonialism and the consequences for third-world women 
of that process, then moves to post-colonial societies and ex- 
pands to include women's political, economic, and social roles 
in the three regions of Africa, China, and Latin America. 

530 American Social History. Three credits. An examination of class, 
ethnicity, family life, and community in America from the colo- 
nial period to the present. 

530A America Divided: Race, Class, and Gender. Three credits. In- 
teraction of race, class, and gender in the lives of Americans 
within historical frameworks; how such interactions have shaped 
American social and political institutions. 

531 The Middle East. Three credits. The development of the Near 
East, the rise and spread of Islam, the Ottoman Empire, Euro- 
pean imperialism in the Near East, contemporary developments. 
Emphasis on cultural contributions of the Near East to western 
civilization. 

532 Diplomatic History of the United States. Three credits. The 
traditions, leading personalities, and main events of U.S. diplo- 
matic history, from the Revolution until the current era. 

533 France Since 1870. Three credits. The social, political, intellec- 
tual, cultural, and economic history of France from the origins 
of the Third Republic to the present. 

535 American Urban History. Three credits. A survey of the devel- 
opment and growth of cities and suburbs from the colonial pe- 
riod to the present with particular emphasis on urban institu- 
tions, problems, politics, culture, and society. 

536 Europe: 1815-1900. Three credits. Nineteenth-century Europe. 

537 Europe: 1900-1939. Three credits. Emphasis on the impact of 
continued industrialization, total war, and totalitarian ideolo- 
gies in the early twentieth century. 

538 Europe Since 1939. Three credits. The major European coun- 
tries and common European-wide themes from World War II to 
the present. 

539 Germany to 1870. Three credits. The evolution of the German 
states from their Indo-European origins to their unification in a 
single German nation in 1871 with particular emphasis on the 
history of German men and women since the Middle Ages. His- 
tory of Austria and its possessions also included. 

540 Germany Since 1870. Three credits. The history of Germany 
from national unification in 1871 through its reunification in 
the contemporary world. Course emphasizes major social, cul- 
tural, political, intellectual, and economic developments of the 
period as they relate to both German men and women. History 
of the Austro-Hungarian empire (1867-1918) and the modern 
Austrian state also included. 

541 Russia to the Twentieth Century. Three credits. Russian history 
from its beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. 



108 History 



542 Russia in the Twentieth Century. Three credits. A continuation 
of 541 emphasizing the Revolution and the soviet era. 

543A History of Medicine. Three credits. Medical developments and 
in particular the relationship between medicine and society. 
Examines two medical traditions: the West and China. Discus- 
sions not only on major developments in medicine but also of 
the systems of healing in these cultures and comparison of the 
different roles medicine played within these societies. Also in- 
vestigates the impact of Western scientific medicine on the vari- 
ous systems of traditional medicine. 

544 History of Sport in America. Three credits. The role of sport in 
American society from the colonial era to the present, with 
emphasis on how sporting activities reflect political, cultural, 
and economic characteristics of various time periods. 

546 Canada. Three credits. Canadian history from the colonial era 
to the present. 

549 The American Indian. Three credits. The North American Indi- 
an's history from the entrance into the New World until the 
present with emphasis on relationships among tribes, economic 
development, prominent personages, and adaptation to white 
culture. 

560 American Biography: Three credits. A survey of the lives and 
achievements of men and women most prominent in American 
history. Selected biographies and autobiographies read and ana- 
lyzed. 

563 The Old South. Three credits. Examines the development of 
southern culture and society up to the end of the nineteenth 
century. Particular emphasis given to the region's vision of itself 
as distinct. 

564 Sections in American History: The West. Three credits. The 
role of the frontier in American history. Emphasis on the trans- 
Mississippi West. 

565 The Modern South. Three credits. Examines southern culture 
and society in the twentieth century. Particular emphasis given 
to race relations, industrialization, and counter cultural move- 
ments. 

568 American Cultural and Intellectual History. Three credits. Ex- 
plores the major issues in American cultural and intellectual his- 
tory through an examination of American literature, philoso- 
phy, social sciences, fine arts, and popular culture. 

570 African-American Social and Intellectual History. Three cred- 
its. The changing role and status of African-Americans in Ameri- 
can life and the contributions to the culture and institutions of 
the United States. 

573 Middle Ages. Three credits. An intensive survey of the progress 
of medieval civilization with emphasis on Byzantine, Moslem, 
and Germanic cultures in the Middle Ages. 

574 England to 1 783. Three credits. English history from earliest times 
to the end of the American Revolution, with emphasis on major 
political, economic, cultural, and social developments. 

576 Classical History. Three credits. Ancient Greece and Rome, from 
about 2,000 B.C. to 476 A.D., emphasizing the classical histori- 
ans and Greek and Roman culture. 

577A Historical Archaeology. Three credits. Introduces the disciplines 
of historical archaeology, including examination of archaeolog- 



ical evidence, historical documentation, and interpretation of 
evidence. 

577B Field Course in Historical Archaeology. Three credits. (Same 
as GEOC 577B and ANTH 577B.) Prerequisite: HIST 577A, 
ANTH 320, or permission of instructor. Archaeological resources 
and procedures and the interpretation of historical evidence 
undertaken at a field archaeological site. 

581 Epochs in American Culture. Three credits. Literature, arts, so- 
cial sciences, and popular culture examined with regard to a 
particular topic (such as the history of sexuality or the history of ^ 
cultural rebellion) in order to understand how Americans have i 
rearted to conflicting values in society. 

582 American Religious History. Three credits. Explores the nature 
of religion as experienced in American history focusing on the 
questions "How has religion affected America?" and "How has 
America affected religion?" Emphasis on the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries and on the contact of and exchanges among 
traditions such as Protestant Catholic Christianity, Judasim, Is- 
lam, and Animism. 

583 Material Culture Resources in World History. Three credits. A 
survey of the architecture, furniture, tools, utensils, weapons, 
ceremonial objects, etc. of the world's major civilizations. Pro- 
vides a basis for studying how various cultural styles have influ- 
enced the development of our own material culture resources. 

585 Introduction to Public History. Three credits. An overview of 
the origins and development of the national historic preserva- 
tion movement in both the public and private sectors. Lectures, 
readings, research, projects, field trips. i 

586 American Architectural History. Three credits. An analysis of 
the historical development of American architerture and of ar- 
chitecture as evidence of America's cultural, social, economic, 
and technological growth from 1 607 to the present. j 

587 Principles ofArchival Administration. Three credits. The theory, ' 

principles, and techniques employed by archivists and curators 
of manuscript collections. Importance of record preservation for 
scholars, business, government, and the public at large stressed. 

588 Development of the Local History Museum. Three credits. An 
overview of the development of muscology, museography, and 
museum administration. Emphasizes approaches for identifying 
and solving typical problems encountered by the local history 
museum. 

590A Topics in Tennessee History. Three credits. Detailed examina- 
tion of a topic pertinent to the history of Tennessee. Topics will 
vary. Students may take HIST 590A for credit twice but permis- 
sion of the department is required for the second enrollment. 

592 Administration of Historic Preservation. Three credits. Proce- 
dures employed by federal, state, and local agencies in the day- 
to-day work of locating, recording, restoring, and preserving the 
historical, architectural, and cultural resources of the United 
Sutes. 

593 Problems in Historic Preservation. Three credits. Applied re- 
search in historic preservation planning and interpreUtion. j 

594 Preservation Internship. Three credits. Student is assigned to a 
public or private agency or organization in an employment sta- 
tus related to historic preservation. 



History 109 



597 Advanced Projects in Historic Preservation. Three credits. Ap- 
plied project experience in a community setting. Interested stu- 
dents not enrolled in the department's Historic Preservation 
concentration should meet with the director of the program be- 
fore enrolling. 

600 Seminar in Medieval Europe. Three credits. A reading seminar 
stressing bibliography, interpretation, and methodologies for ei- 
ther the socio-economic, cultural-intellectual, or political-mili- 
tary history of the Middle Ages. 

601 Seminar in Renaissance and Reformation Europe. Three cred- 
its. A reading seminar stressing bibliography, interpretation, and 
methodologies for either the socio-economic, cultural-intellec- 
tual, or political-military history of the Renaissance and Refor- 
mation. 

603/ Seminar In Elghteentli-Century Europe. Three credits. Prereq- 

703 uisite: Elementary knowledge of French. The story, sources, and 

significance of eighteenth-century Europe from the decline of 

Louis XIV to the rise of Napoleon I. A combination of lectures, 

discussions, oral reports, and research projects. 

604 Seminar on Topics in Premodern Europe. Three credits. A re- 
search seminar covering selected topics in European history 
before 1715. 

605 Public History Internship. Three credits. Full-time apprentice- 
ship with a public or private historical agency or institution of 
regional or national significance. Internships offered during the 
summer months and may be paid. Enrollment limited to history 
students in the public history and historic preservation program. 

606 Public History Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisite: HIST 585 
or consent of the instructor. Supervision of local work-related 
experience and applied research in area public or private histor- 
ical agencies. 

607 Historical Inquiry. Three credits. An introduction to history's 
major schools of thought. Through reading, class discussion, and 
essays, students explore critical interpretations in American, 
European, and non-Western history. 

608 Seminar In Historical Discourse. Three credits. Sharpens com- 
prehension of historical interpretation by exploring, through 
reading, research, and class discussion, possible alternative ex- 
planations for specific historical events and themes. 

609 Selected Readings In History. Three credits. A common selec- 
tion of historiographical works that raise issues common to all 
historians and that discuss history, historical processes, and his- 
torical-mindedness. Students will discuss these works and per- 
haps also write critical analyses of them. 

629 Seminar In European Women's History. Three credits. Investi- 
gates aspects of women's lives in Europe. Countries and time 
periods covered selected by the instructor. Topics include women 
and religion, women and war, women and the family, and the 
impact of ethnicity, class, nationality, gender, and race on Euro- 
pean women's lives. 

640 Seminar in the Third Reich. Three credits. Preparation for stu- 
dents to think critically, research competently, and write intelli- 
gently about the history of National Socialist Germany. 

641 Seminar in the Old South. Three credits. Examines the major 
secondary works which have shaped our understanding of the 
colonial and antebellum South. 



642 Seminar in American Sections: The New South. Three credits. 
Readings and research in aspects of the American South since 
1865. 

650/ Seminar In Colonial and Early American History to 1 800. Three 
750 credits. Readings, discussion, reports, and independent study 
examining selected aspects of institutional and intellectual de- 
velopments to 1 800. 

652/ Seminar In Jacksonlan America. Three credits. Exploration of a 

752 variety of social, economic, political, and cultural topics in the 
Jacksonian era and an analysis of the relationship between these 
topics and similar events abroad. 

653/ Seminar in American Social History. Three credits. Prerequi- 

753 site: Instructor's permission required. Focuses on selected top- 
ics in American social history through directed readings, research, 
and discussion. 

654 Seminar in American Women's History. Three credits. Focuses 
on selected topics in American women's history through directed 
readings, research, and discussion. 

662/ Seminar in Recent American History. Three credits. The 
762 bibliography, interpretation, and selected topics of the history 
of the United States since 1900. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

668/ Seminar in State and Local History. Three credits. An intensive 

768 inquiry into sources of state and local history. Several research 
papers using primary materials required. 

669/ Selected Studies in American History. One to three credits. 

769 Intensive reading on a carefully defined topic in American his- 
tory to be selected by the student in conference with the in- 
structor. 

670/ Seminar in Afro-America. Three credits. Selected topics in Afro- 

770 American history. Emphasis on the post-Reconstruction period 
of United States history. 

671/ Seminar in Latin America. Three credits. Selected topics in the 

771 social, economic, and political development of Latin America. 

672/ Seminar In American Diplomatic History. Three credits. Se- 

772 lected topics of U.S. diplomatic history treated in depth. Con- 
flicting scholarly interpretations are analyzed and diplomatic 
source materials are consulted. Formal paper required. 

673/ Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Europe. Three credits. Selected 

773 topics. A research paper using primary materials required. 

674/ Seminar in Recent European History. Three credits. A com- 

774 bined readings and research seminar of twentieth-century Eu- 
rope. The readings will be over several major topics. The re- 
search will involve thorough knowledge and use of available 
materials — primary and secondary — on each student-selected 
topic. 

678/ Seminar In American Cultural and Intellectual History. Three 
778 credits. Readings and research in selected topics from the colo- 
nial period to the present. 



110 



679/ Selected Studies in European History. One to three credits. 
779 In-depth reading on a well-defined topic in European history to 
be selected by the student in conference with the instructor. 

682 Seminar in American Religious History. Three credits. Spe- 
cific themes in the development of religion in America explored 
through directed readings, research, writing, and discussion. 

685/ Seminar in Historic Preservation. Three credits. Readings and 
785 research on selected topics related to the history, organization, 
and administration of historic preservation in the United States 
and to the use of the community as a classroom. 

688 Museum Seminar. Three credits. In-depth analysis of museum 
management issues from acquisitions and collections to curatorial 
care and exhibitions. Includes advanced problem-solving for 
museum staff and consideration of ethical issues such as repa- 
triation of artifacts. 

689 Cultural Resources Seminar. Three credits. Intensive study of 
cultural resource preservation planning and protection using Na- 
tional Park Service themes and definitions for history and pre- 
history. Emphasizes ethnic diversity in evaluating historic sites, 
linear parks, heritage trails, and national monuments. 

692/ Seminar in the Far East. Three credits. The bibliography- 
792 interpretation and selected topics in the history of China and 
Japan. 

694/ Seminar in American Sections: The West. Three credits. Ma- 
jor 

794 developments in Western history; the leading historians of the 
West. 

696/ American Material Culture. Three credits. Intensive study of 
796 cultural heritage resources available in the local community and 

methods for identifying, analyzing, and incorporating them into 

existing social studies and history courses. 

760/ History Internship. One to three credits. Students are given 
761 careful supervision in actual teaching experiences. 

764 Dissertation Research. One to six credits. Selection of a re- 
search problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and 
analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled 
student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral 
research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 




Department of 
Human Sciences 



Karla V. Hughes, Chair 

Ellington Human Sciences Building 100 

The Department of Human Sciences offers a Master of 
Science in Human Sciences with a choice of two con- 
centrations: Child Development and Family Studies or 
Nutrition and Food Science, in addition, the depart- 
ment cooperates with the Schools/Departments of 
Agribusiness and Agriscience; Business Education, Mar- 
keting Education, and Office Management; and Engi- 
neering Technology and Industrial Studies in offering 
the Master of Vocational-Technical Education (M.V.T.E.) 
and offers a graduate minor. 

For unconditional admission, an undergraduate grade 
point average (CPA) of 2.75 is required. Normally, a 
test score of either 800 on the Graduate Record Exam 
or 35 on the Miller Analogies Test is recommended. 
Conditional admission may be granted for students not 
meeting unconditional admission requirements. Stu- 
dents who are admitted on a temporary conditional 
basis will be expected 1) to complete 9 semester hours 
in the Human Sciences Department with a B or better 
with 6 of the 9 hours at the 600 level and 2) to success- 
fully complete a departmental admission review. Let- 
ters of recommendation may be required. 

Requirements for the Master of Science 
(500 and 600 level) 

Candidate must 

1. have completed an undergraduate minor in Child Devel- 
opment and Family Studies or Nutrition and Food Science 
or the equivalent; 

2. complete 33 hours including H SC 653, 662, and a major 
of 1 8 hours with no more than 30 percent of the total de- 
gree hours dually listed as undergraduate/graduate hours: 

a. a concentration in Child Development and Family Studies 
to include CDFS 630 or 631, 632, and 633, or 

b. a concentration in Nutrition and Food Science to include 
N FS 620, 621 , and 622 or 623; 

file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 
complete an approved research tool with grade of C or 
better (PSY 628 or STAT 61 6); 
complete a thesis (H SC 664); 

successfully complete a written comprehensive exam' 
(may be taken no more than twice); 
complete and submit an article for publication to a peer- 
reviewed journal based on thesis research is recom- 
mended. 



3. 



4. 



Human Sciences 111 



Candidates may select a 1 2-hour minor with approval of the 
advisor as defined on page 19 of the Graduate Catalog. 

Courses In Human Sciences [H SC] 

504 Seminar In Human Sciences. Prerequisite: Permission of chair. 
Individual research and/or analysis of contemporary problems 
and issues in a concentrated area of study. For advanced stu- 
dents. 

A. Human Development-Family Life. Three credits. 

B. Foods-Nutrition. Three credits. 

C. Clothing-Textiles. Three credits. 

D. Housing-Design. Three credits. 

505 Advanced Problems in Human Sciences. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of chair. Provides an opportunity for advanced students to do 
independent study or conduct research in their areas of concentra- 
tion. One hour seminar per week plus independent study in: 

A. Human Development-Family Life. Three credits. 

B. Foods-Nutrition. Three credits. 

C. Clothing-Textiles. Three credits. 

D. Housing-Design. Three credits. 

506 Readings in Human Sciences. One to three credits. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of chair. Selected readings of current trends, 
developments, and research in human sciences of interest to 
teachers and students. One hour seminar per week and inde- 
pendent study. 

541 Consumer Economics. Three credits. Consideration of theoreti- 
cal economics as related to the family. An overview of the choices 
available and the decision-making process confronting the fam- 
ily in the American economy. 

542 Personal and Family Management. Three credits. Management 
theories applied to personal and family resources throughout 
the life cycle. Emphasis on the development of knowledge from 
which to draw conclusions about the financial elements of life. 
Offered once a year. 

543 Resource Management. Three credits. Opportunity to coordi- 
nate the many areas of human sciences in the solution of indi- 
vidual and group management problems. 

> Professionalism in Consumer Services. Three credits. The role, 
functions, and responsibilities of consumer services profession- 
als employed in business, government, and other organizations. 

D Issues and Trends in Human Sciences. One to three credits. 
An in-depth analysis of one or more current issues or trends in 
human sciences. Topics will vary. 

2 Public Policy on Consumer and Family Issues. Three credits. 
The ideological roots, impact, and effectiveness of family policy. 
Family well-being in the areas of health, child care, care of the 
elderly and disabled, and poverty examined in relation to the 
development of public policy. 

} Effective Program Management. Three credits. Integration of 
human sciences concepts and content with the principles of 
program management, including planning, organization, staff- 
ing, implementation, and evaluation. 

2 Research Methods in Human Sciences. Three credits. Introduc- 
tion to methods and tools of research. Selection and statement 
of research problems, formulation of research proposal. 

t Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 



data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

Courses In Textiles, Merchandising, 
and Design [TXMD] 

513 History of Costume. Three credits. Survey of clothing and de- 
sign from ancient to modern times; consideration given to so- 
cial economic, and cultural conditions reflected in dress. 

517 Social Aspects of Clothing. Three credits. Principles of sociol- 
ogy and psychology applied to the study of clothing behavior. 
Research methods for studying socio-psychological aspects of 
clothing Included. Offered once a year. 

Courses in Nutrition and Food Science [N FS] 

520 Diet and Disease. Three credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 308, N FS 
427. Nutritional problems In disease and modifications of nor- 
mal diet to meet dietary requirements of pathological condi- 
tions. Offered once a year. 

521 Nutrition in Aging. Three credits. Prerequisite: N FS 124 or 
222. Nutritional needs of elderly individuals and how these re- 
quirements are affected by physiological, pathological, and so- 
cioeconomic changes associated with aging. Emphasis on as- 
sessment, nutrition counseling skills, and resources to assist eld- 
erly individuals with adequate nutrient Intake. Offered once a 
year. 

522 Food Systems Management I. Three credits. Prerequisite: N FS 
320 or 321 or permission of Instructor. Principles and produc- 
tion of quantity foods. Emphasis on types of food service sys- 
tems, delivery systems, menu planning and evaluation, procure- 
ment, receiving, quality control, inventory, cost containment, 
safety, and sanitation. Five hours per week. 

524 Experimental Food Study. Three credits. Prerequisites: N FS 
320 and CHEM 303 or permission of Instructor. Chemical and 
physical factors afferting the flavor, texture, color, and appear- 
ance of food. Emphasis on evaluation of sensory qualities of 
food using subjective and objective measurements and new food 
product development. Offered once per year. 

525 Child Nutrition. Three credits. Prerequisite: N FS 124 or 222. 
Nutritional needs during pregnancy, infancy, and childhood re- 
lated to physical and mental development. Emphasis on cul- 
tural, social, and psychological aspects of the development of 
food patterns and nutrition education resources. 

526 Food Safety Issues from Production to Consumption. Three 
credits. Food safety issues that Impact food production, food 
storage and transportation, food processing, and food consump- 
tion within food production facilities, the home, and food ser- 
vice facilities. Consumer concerns evaluated based on risk theory 
and scientific evaluation of safety. Including decision-making 
through critical thinking. Food standards and regulations de- 
signed to improve safety of food also discussed. 

527 Advanced Nutrition. Three credits. Prerequisite: N FS 1 24 or 
222. Nutrient utilization, cellular metabolism, and nutritional 
status assessment. Participation Includes seminar presentation 
on a current issue in nutrition. Offered once a year. 

528 Food Systems Management II. Three credits. Functions of man- 
agement applied to food service industry. Emphasis on systems 
approach to food service operation, organizational structure. 



112 Human Sciences 



personnel management, leadership and management styles, 
work improvement, and labor relations. Offered once a year. 

529 Dietetic Practicum. Six credits. Prerequisites: N FS 420 and 
422. Practical preparation in clinical dietetics. Clinical experi- 
ence provided with the cooperation of Middle Tennessee Medi- 
cal Center and other facilities. For dietetics students only. Of- 
fered summer only. 

560 Diet and Disease Seminar. One credit. To be taken concur- 
rently with N FS 520. Nutrition and Food Science majors only. 
Practice in applying the knowledge base acquired in N FS 520 
to structured case studies and development of the critical think- 
ing skills needed to design accurate and systematic nutrition care 
plans in the clinical setting. 

620 Metabolism of Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 325 or equivalent. Sequential to 
N FS 527 or equivalent. Advanced study of carbohydrates, lip- 
ids, and proteins with emphasis on the metabolic interactions 
at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Offered alternate years. 

621 Vitamin and Mineral Metabolism. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 325 or equivalent. Sequential to N FS 527 or equivalent. 
Metabolic functions and mechanisms of micronutrient action in 
human nutrition with an emphasis on physiological require- 
ments, assessment techniques, and interrelationships in disease 
prevention. Offered alternate years. 

622 Food Industry Applied Nutrition. Three credits. Integration of 
food technological considerations, nutrition attributes, consumer 
perceptions, and socio-demographic influences to determine 
food choice, and thus diet quality. 

623 Advanced Clinical Nutrition. Three credits. Sequential to N FS 
520 and 527. Integration of the principles of basic biological 
diseases in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the 
nutritional aspects of disease including nutritional assessment 
and dietary implication in the etiology of disease. 

629 Clinical Dietetics. Six credits. Planned educational experiences 
in administration of food service systems and experiences in a 
health care facility applying principles of normal and clinical 
nutrition to nutritional problems occurring throughout the life 
cycle. 

Courses in Child Development 
and Family Studies [CDFS] 

514 Violence in the Family. Three credits. (Same as SOC 514.) 
Causes, dynamics, and consequences of violence in the family. 
Includes the discussion of violence toward children, spouses, 
dating partners, siblings, and elders. Emphasizes the social con- 
ditions which lead to these types of violence. 

530 Nursery School Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisites: CDFS 
235, 331, 437 or permission of instructor. Advanced informa- 
tion and skills working with three- and four-year olds. Lab inter- 
action with children; planning and implementation of curricu- 
lum. Three-hours laboratory plus two-hour seminar per week. 

533 Primary Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisites: CDFS 430, 438; 
ELED 225, 325; admission to teacher education. Advanced 
knowledge and skills in working with kindergarten and primary 
age students. Consists of field experiences in the appropriate 
development and implementation of curriculum in kindergar- 
ten and one other primary grade. Three hours laboratory and 
two hours seminar per week. 



534 The Contemporary Family. Three credits. Prerequisite: CDFS, 
332 or permission of instructor. An ecological approach to the 
study of contemporary issues, problems, questions, and lifestyles 
as they relate to families and individuals. 

535 Parenting. Three credits. Developing knowledge and under- 
standing of parenting and parent/child interaction theories. Ex- 
amination and development of parent education programs. 

536 Day Care Perspectives. Three credits. Prerequisites: CDFS 235 
and 331 or permission of instructor. Examination of diverse day 
care settings and their influence on human development. Em- 
phasis on the organization/administration of day care programs. 
Participation in day care center experiences required. Three 
hours plus one hour observation per week. 

537 Effective Instruction (Birth - 5 years). Three credits. Prerequi- 
sites: CDFS 235, 331, or permission of instructor. A compre- 
hensive exploration of the knowledge and skills necessary for 
designing and implementing curricula appropriate for programs 
serving children birth to five years. 

538 Infant/Toddler Practicum. Three credits. Prerequisites: CDFS 
235, 331, and 437/537 or permission of instructor. Advanced 
information and skills in working with infants and toddlers (birth 
to three years). Lab participation involving interactions with chil- 
dren as well as planning and implementing curriculum required. 
Three-hour laboratory and a two-hour seminar per week. 

539 Families in Later life. Three credits. Prerequisite: Human Sciences 
majors - CDFS 332; Sociology majors - SOC 260; or permission ol 
the instructor. Examination of families in later life from an eco- 
logical approach with emphasis on family forms and relationships. 

630 Application of Child Development Principles I. Three credits. 
A comprehensive exploration of human growth and develop- 
ment from conception to age six. Recognizing and assessing 
developmental ages and stages as well as special needs is an 
integral part of this course. 

631 Application of Child Development Principles II. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: CDFS 630 or equivalent. Advanced study ol 
the child from the age of six through adolescence from a holistic 
perspective. 

632 Families at Risk. Three credits. Prerequisite: CDFS 332 oi 
permission of the instructor. The dynamics, context, and overal 
impact of factors which place families at risk. Methods by which 
family members cope with normative and/or catastrophic stressoi 
events analyzed from a variety of theoretical perspectives. 

633 Theories of Child Development and Family Relations. Three 
credits. The advanced study of individual and family theory, as 
well as theory principles and evaluation criteria. 

670 Practicum in English as a Second Language for Pre K-3. One 

credit. Includes ten hours field experience in the ESL classroom 
with Pre K-3 students from different cultures. 



Courses in Family and 

Consumer Sciences Education [FCSE] 

550 Occupational Field Experience. Three credits each. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. Directed participation in plannec 
and supervised occupational experiences of eight hours fieic 
experience per week. Must apply previous semester. 

A. Care and Guidance of Children. Three credits. 

B. Food Management, Production, and Services. Three credits. 



I 



113 



554 Teaching Home Economics. One to six credits. Synthesis and 
application of relevant concepts relating to educational plan- 
ning; changes relating to the development of effective home 
economics education programs. A maximum of six semester 
hours credit may be applied toward a degree. 

555 Curriculum Development. Three credits. Review of recent ad- 
vances in home economics education. Analysis and evaluation of 
selected topics, materials, and methods in terms of their appropri- 
ateness for reaching curriculum objectives in home economics. 

556 Problems in Teaching Materials. One to three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of chair. Application of principles and tech- 
niques involved in the selection and preparation of effective 
teaching materials and visual aids. 

557 Occupational Home Economics Seminar. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. Examination and analysis of pro- 
gram development, execution, and evaluation in a selected occu- 
pational area. 

Courses in Interior Design [IDES] 

570 History of Interiors. Three credits. Historical interiors: survey 
analysis, application. Emphasis on major design characteristics 
of interior furnishing styles. Offered once a year. 

571 Survey of Contemporary Interior Design. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: IDES 470/570 or consent of instructor. Development of con- 
temporary interiors from the early nineteenth century to the present 
with consideration given to style characteristics, cultural influences, 
designers, and relationships among styles. Offered once a year. 




Department of 
Management and 
Marketing 



Jill Austin, Chair 

Business and Aerospace Building N121D 

The Department of Management and Marketing offers 
courses in management and marketing in the Master of 
Business Administration degree. The associate dean and 
director of graduate business studies serves as advisor 
for the Master of Business Administration (page 56). 

Courses in Management [MGMT] 
General Management [MGMT] 

600 Management and Operations Concepts. Three credits. Con- 
cepts of the management functions of planning, organizing, lead- 
ing, and controlling as applied to managing people in organiza- 
tions. Production and operations management concepts with 
emphasis on using quantitative models for decision making. Pre- 
requisite for M.B.A. program. May not be used for elective credit 
in graduate business degree program. 



660 



667 



674 



675 



Study of Organizations. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 361 
or 600. Behavioral science concepts and research in the man- 
agement of organizations; theories dealing with interpersonal 
relationships, motivation systems, group dynamics, communica- 
tions, and authority related to organizational behavior, control, 
and structure problems. 

Seminar in Organization Development. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: MGMT 361 or 600. Diagnostic approaches for effecting 
planned changes in organizations. Emphasis on the individual 
and personal development of the student to be more effective 
in managing change and innovation. 

Seminar in Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 
361 or 600. In-depth study of current developments in manage- 
ment theory and practice. An evaluation of contemporary 
thought on managerial roles in modern conglomerates and a 
comparative analysis of this role in specialized organizations and 
across variations in national and international operative envir- 
onment. Recent methodology in management and organization 
studies. 

Leadership and Motivation. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 
361 or 600. Issues in leadership and motivation in business or- 
ganizations. An examination of the theoretical framework for 
leadership and motivation processes serves as foundation. Em- 
phasis on practical issues and applications of leadership devel- 
opment and motivation. 

Business Ethics. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 361 or 600. 
Impact of individual values and ethics on the management of 
organizations. Topics include legal and ethical aspects of deal- 
ing with organization stakeholders: stockholders, consumers, em- 
ployees, and the general community. Emphasis on using ethical 
theory to make good business decisions. 



114 Management and Marketing 



677 International Management Three credits. Prerequisites: MGMT 
361 or 600 and MKT 382 or 600. Major issues associated with 
the formulation and implementation of corporate strategy for 
international and global operations. Emphasis on the understand- 
ing of global environmental forces surrounding international 
business operations and the management issues facing global 
organizations. 

679 Problems in Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: 21 gradu- 
ate hours and/or approval of department chair. Individual re- 
search and analysis of contemporary problems and Issues in a 
concentrated area of study under the guidance of an approved 
faculty member. 

Human Resources [MGMT] 

651 Current Problems in Human Resource Management and In- 
dustrial Relations. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 361 or 
600. Investigation of current problems. Emphasis on current 
theory, problems, and prartices in the public and private sector. 
Consideration of legal and political environment stressed as re- 
lated to management policy formulation. 

668 Seminar in Human Resources Management Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: MGMT 361 or 600. Focus on the responsibility of all 
managers with respect to the effective development of human 
resources. The responsibility of all functional areas in the hu- 
man resource department or impinging forces such as technol- 
ogy, organized labor, and government legislation examined along 
with the emerging concepts, problems, and theories supported 
by research in the field. 



Operations [MGMT] 

665 Operations Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 
362 or 600. Strategic and tactical decisions involved with plan- 
ning, operating, and controlling the operations functions in a 
firm. Emphasis on problem identification and solution. 

670 Production and Operations Management Strategy. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: MGMT 362 or 600. Focuses on operations stra- 
tegy concepts and operations management as a competitive 
weapon. Topics include global production and operations man- 
agement strategy, capacity of facilities, vertical integration, per- 
formance controls, and the importance of manufacturing for 
overall business strategy. 

676 Total Quality Management Three credits. Prerequisites: MGMT 
361 and 362 or 600. Examination of the major total quality 
management philosophies; consideration of implementation 
issues; quality costs, off- and on-line tools and techniques; ven- 
dor certification. 

Courses in Marketing [MKT] 

600 Marketing Concepts. Three credits. A survey of the functions, 
processes, and institutions involved in the creation, promotion, 
pricing, and distribution of consumer and industrial goods and 
services with an emphasis on the decision-making process. May 
not be used for elective credit in graduate business degree 
program. 

680 Marketing Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: MKT 382 
or 600. An analytical managerial approach to the marketing 
activities of a business enterprise. Emphasis on problem solving 
and marketing simulation. 



681 Promotional Strategy. Three credits. Prerequisite: MKT 382 or 
600. Promotional goals, plans, and concepts in marketing; the 
role of marketing communication in society; the organization 
budgeting, and scheduling of promotion; innovation and the 
adoption process; managerial decision making in the promo- 
tional mix. 

682 Market Behavior. Three credits. Prerequisite: MKT 382 or 600. 
Behavioral science concepts and applied research relating to 
the process of buyer behavior. Topics include cognition, moti- 
vation, personality, group influence, social class, culture, and 
behavior models. 

683 Marketing Systems Three credits. Prerequisite: MKT 382 or 600. 

An analytic, decision-oriented study of marketing channels. Prob- 
lems of integrating relevant variables within the marketing sys- 
tem to achieve optimum returns for all members. 

684 Marketing Seminar: Current Topics in Marketing. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: MKT 382 or 600. Theoretical bases of market- 
ing concepts, principles, and strategies; the development, ac- 
ceptance, and possible future direction of emerging concepts 
and practices. 

685 International Marketing Seminar. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
MKT 382 or 600. Difference in market arrangements and in 
legal, cultural, and economic factors in different countries. Plan- 
ning and organizing for international marketing operations, fore- 
casting, and analyses; interrelationships with other functions; 
strategy of product pricing, promotion, and channels. 

686 Marketing Research and Decision Making. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: MKT 382 or 600. Investigates research methods for 
providing marketing information to assist managers in making 
better decisions, particularly in identifying marketing opportu- 
nities and problems. Specifically focuses on understanding both 
primary and secondary research processes and developing an 
ability to evaluate primary and secondary sources of informa- 
tion. 

689 Problems in Marketing. Three credits. Prerequisites: MKT 600 
or 382 and approval of department chair. Individual research 
and analysis of contemporary problems and issues in a concen- 
trated area of study under the guidance of an approved gradu- 
ate faculty member. Not approved or substituted for core re- 
quirements. Approval of supervisory faculty member and de- 
partment chair must be obtained in writing before student will 
be allowed to register for independent study 

Courses in Business Administration [B AD] 

610 International Research. One to six credits. Prerequisite: Approv- 
al of graduate faculty, department chair, and director of gradu- 
ate business studies. Independent research in international bus- 
iness. A comprehensive report required. Report should be com- 
pleted eight weeks after the beginning of the semester for those 
students planning an internship. 

698 Business Policy. Three credits. Advanced problem analysis re- 
quiring the synthesis of theory and practice gained from both 
the functional and managerial areas of study with emphasis on 
formulation, integration, and implementation of policies and 
strategies of the firm. This is a capstone course and must be 
taken after all core requirements or by consent of the director 
of the M.B.A. program in the last semester prior to graduation. 



115 



Mass 
Communication 



Geoffrey Hull, Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies 
Bragg Mass Communication 248 

The College of Mass Communication offers the Master 
of Science degree in Mass Communication and a mi- 
nor at the graduate level. Normally, a score of 900 on 
the Graduate Record Examination is required for ad- 
mission to the degree program. 

Requirements for the Master of Science 

The degree is designed for media professionals in fields such 
as advertising, electronic media, journalism, publishing, or 
recording industries seeking to broaden their understanding 
of the field of mass communication and to develop research 
and management skills relevant to decision making in me- 
dia-related organizations. It is also appropriate for those who 
wish to pursue the doctoral degree. 

Students may choose from two options organized around the 
thesis/professional project or the comprehensive examina- 
tion. The thesis/project option is designed for the student 
seeking to concentrate studies in a particular area and to ex- 
perience in-depth independent research. This option has 1 2 
hours of core courses, 1 2 hours of limited choice electives, 6 
hours of free electives, and the capstone thesis or project. 
The thesis results in the production of traditional academic 
research; the professional project results in the application of 
research knowledge to a professional production or other 
project. The examination option is designed for the working 
person who is integrating graduate education and professional 
life and for the traditional student seeking a broad concep- 
tual grounding in mass communication. The examination 
option has 21 hours of required courses, 9 hours of limited 
choice electives, 3 hours of general electives, a 3-hour 
capstone course, and the comprehensive examination. 

Thesis and Project Options 

Candidate must 

1. have earned 18 credits in the social sciences (anthro- 
pology, economics, history, political science, psychology, 
sociology); 

2. provide evidence of a minimum of one year of full-time 
professional experience in a media-related position. In 
exceptional cases, a student without sufficient profes- 
sional experience may be admitted on the condition he 
or she completes an approved program of skills courses 
and/or an internship in a mass communication field. 

3. complete 36 semester hours as follows: 
Required courses: 

MC 600 The Science of Communication 
MC 601 Cultural Studies in Communication 

j MC 61 1 Quantitative Research Methods 

I (required research tool) 



MC 61 2 QualiUtive Research Methods 

(required research tool) 
MC 664 Thesis Research OR 
MC 665 Professional Project (6 hours) 
Two of the following courses: 
MC 620 Media Management 
MC 623 Media in the Marketplace 
MC 625 Media Organizations 
At least two of the following: 
MC 630 Media Law and Ethics 
MC 632 Mass Media and Public Opinion 
MC 635 Cultural Studies in Popular Music 
MC 638 News, Culture, and Democracy 
MC 640 Communication and Technology 
6 hours of approved electives (taken inside or outside the Col- 
lege of Mass Communication as benefits research orientation and 
no more than three credits can be taken at the 500 level) 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office before 
the completion of 24 hours; 

5. submit and defend an acceptable thesis or project. 

Exam Option 

Candidate must 

1 . have earned 1 8 credits in the social sciences (anthropol- 
ogy, economics, history, political science, psychology, 
sociology); 

2. provide evidence of a minimum of one year of full-time 
professional experience in a media-related position. In 
exceptional cases, students without sufficient professional 
experience may be admitted on the condition he or she 
completes an approved program of skills courses and/or 
an internship in a mass communication field. 

3. complete 36 semester hours as follows: 
Required courses: 

MC 600 The Science of Communication 
MC 601 Cultural Studies in Communication 
MC 61 1 Quantitative Research Methods 

(required research tool) 
MC 61 2 QualiUtive Research Methods 

(required research tool) 
MC 620 Media Management 
MC 623 Media in the Marketplace 
MC 625 Media Organizations 
MC 659 Case Studies in Media Management OR 
MC 660 Seminar in Applied Research 
At least three of the following: 
MC 630 Media Law and Ethics 
MC 632 Mass Media and Public Opinion 
MC 635 Cultural Studies in Popular Music 
MC 638 News, Culture, and Democracy 
MC 640 Communication and Technology 
3 hours general elective 

4. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office before 
the completion of 24 hours; 

5. pass a written comprehensive examination. 

Courses in Mass Communication [MC] 

600 The Science of Communication. Three credits. Quantitative and 
qualitative research dealing with the uses and effects of mass 
communication. 

601 Cultural Studies in Communication. Three credits. Relation- 
ship of communication to culture with particular emphasis on 
the everyday life contexts of media audiences. 



116 Mass Communication 



61 Research Design. Three credits. Formulating research questions, 
developing operational definitions, selecting measures. Analy- 
sis of surveys, observational techniques, and interpretive stud- 
ies. 

61 1 Quantitative Research Methods. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
MC 600. Techniques of communication research emphasizing 
survey and experimenul methods. Sampling, questionnaire con- 
struction, data gathering, and statistical methods. 

61 2 Qualitative Research Methods. Three credits. Prerequisite: MC 
601 . Techniques of communication research emphasizing partici- 
pant observation, ethnography, and focus groups. Interviewing, 
observation, problems of generalization, ethics of fieldwork. 

620 Media Management Three credits. Application of the case study 
method to understanding the role of management and manag- 
ers in the delivery of media to the marketplace. Application of 
management and organization theory to the problems of the 
mass media. 

623 Media in the Marketplace. Three credits. The use of various 
forms of audience research in media organizations. Social and 
ethical conflicts related to marketing. 

625 Media Organizations. Three credits. An examination of the 
structure of media organizations. Roles of creators, producers, 
distributors, publics, institutional frameworks. 

630 Media Law and Ethics. Three credits. An overview of the laws 
relating to the media. Ethical and social dimensions of law. Em- 
phasis on case studies. 

632 Mass Media and Public Opinion. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
MC 600. Theories of democracy, the nature of a "public" and of 
"public opinion." Readings in the classics on mass media and 
democracy and in public opinion research. 

635 Cultural Studies in Popular Music. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
MC 601. Relationship of popular music to society with atten- 
tion to institutional, textual, and audience studies. 



638 News, Culture, and Democracy. Three credits. Prerequisite: ' 
MC 601 . Critical examination of the news process with atten-* 
tion to the relationship of economic, cultural, and political con- 
straints. 

640 Communication and Technology. Three credits. Readings in 
the cultural history of media technology explore technological 
change and social development as a system of interrelated so- 
cial relations and practices. 

643 Special Topics in Communication. Three credits. An in-depth 
analysis of one or more current issues or sub-disciplines. Topics 
will vary from semester to semester. 

659 Case Studies in Media Management Three credits. A capstone 
course that emphasizes the integration of communication the- 
ory and method with management philosophy in the planning 
of strategy for media organizations. Emphasis on case studies 
and student presentations. Requires consent of director of gradu- 
ate studies or instructor. 

660 Seminar in Applied Research. Three credits. A capstone course 
that emphasizes the application of various research methodolo- 
gies to decision making in media organizations. 

661 Directed Reading and Research. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
Permission of graduate director. Completion and execution of a 
research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. P/F 
grading. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Under the direction of a 
faculty advisor and graduate committee, the student will plan 
and execute an original research or creative project. Once en- 
rolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of 
master's research each semester until completion. S/U grading. 

665 Professional Project. One to six credits. Completion and ex- 
ecution of a professional project under the direction of a faculty 
advisor and graduate committee. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's project each se- • 
mester until graduation. S/U grading. 




117 



Department of 

Mathematical 

Sciences 



Curtis K. Church, Chair 
Kirksey Old Main 223D 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers the 
Master of Science with a major in Mathematics, the 
Master of Science in Teaching with a major in Math- 
ematics, and a minor in Mathematics at the graduate 
level. 

Three concentrations are offered under the Master of 
Science: General Mathematics, Industrial Mathematics, 
and Research Preparation. Two concentrations are of- 
fered under the Master of Science in Teaching: Middle 
Grade Mathematics and Secondary Mathematics. 

Admission to either master's program requires an ex- 
pected GRE score of 900 or an MAT score of 44. 



Requirements for the Master of Science 
in Mathematics 

The Master of Science in Mathematics requires a core of 9 
hours plus 18 hours of specified courses in the department 
and a 9-hour cognate of supporting courses. Every candidate 
is required to declare a concentration selected from General 
Mathematics, Industrial Mathematics, or Research Preparation. 

All candidates must 

1 . have completed an undergraduate prerequisite of at least 
21 hours of college-level mathematics including calcu- 
lus; any deficiency should be removed during the first 
year of study; 

2. complete 36 hours including the core (9 hours), a con- 
centration (18 hours), and a cognate area (9 hours); 

3. complete at least 30 hours at the graduate level with at 
least 21 hours at the 600 level; 

4. participate in the graduate seminar and give an oral pre- 
sentation of an approved topic; 

5. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate Office prior to 
the completion of 24 credit hours; 

6. successfully complete a written comprehensive exam- 
ination (may be taken no more than twice). 

I M.S. Core 

I Each candidate for the Master of Science in Mathematics must 
I complete the following core (9 hours): 
I MATH 61 2 Advanced Linear Algebra 
I MATH 61 7 Sets and Logic 
'MATH 619 Analysis! 



Concentration: General Mathematics 

Students desiring a broad background in mathematics should 
pursue this concentration. In addition to the core, students 
must complete the concentration and a cognate as outlined 
below. 

Concentration 

Eighteen (18) hours from approved courses in mathematical sciences, 

including at least one course from each of three different groups: 

Algebra/Number Theory: MATH 542, 553, 61 4A, 651 

Analysis: MATH 61 4B, 620, 621, 625 

Combinatorics/Graph Theory: MATH 570, 670 

Geometry/Topology: MATH 527, 640, 61 4C 

Industrial Mathematics: MATH 531, 532, 626, 627, 630, 631 

Cognate 

Nine (9) additional hours approved by advisor 

The master's thesis is an option in this concentration. 

Concentration: Industrial Mathematics 

Students interested in positions in industry or further gradu- 
ate work in applied mathematics should pursue this concen- 
tration. In addition to the core, students must complete the 
concentration and a cognate as outlined below. 

Concentration 

Eighteen (1 8) hours including MATH 531 , 532, 626, and 627 plus two 
from MATH 621, 630, 631, 640, 641, 670, or STAT 616, 618. 

Cognate 

Nine (9) additional hours chosen from the above list; MATH 664, and/ 
or courses from relevant disciplines approved by advisor. 

The master's thesis is an option in this concentration. 

Concentration: Research Preparation 

Students wishing to pursue the Ph.D. in mathematics should 
choose this concentration. In addition to the core, students 
must complete the concentration and a cognate as outlined 
below. 

Concentration 

Eighteen (18) hours including MATH 527, 553, 570, 620, 61 4A, and 
621. 

Cognate 

Nine (9) hours including MATH 664 and six (6) additional hours ap- 
proved by advisor. 



Requirements for the 
Master of Science in Teaching 

This degree should be pursued by students interested in teach- 
ing. Admission is open to those licensed as teachers as well 
as those seeking initial licensure. 

Candidates seeking initial licensure must meet the major re- 
quirements listed below, satisfy a professional education com- 
ponent, and meet discipline-related requirements. The can- 
didate should contact the chair of the Department of Educa- 
tional Leadership for the professional education component 
and the chair of the Department of Mathematical Sciences 
for the discipline-related requirements. 

The Master of Science in Teaching requires the M.S.T. core of 
9 hours plus 1 5 hours of specified courses in the department 



118 Mathematical Sciences 



and a 1 2-hour cognate in professional education. Every can- 
didate is required to declare a concentration in either Middle 
Grade or Secondary Mathematics. 

All candidates must 

1 . complete 36 hours including the core (9 hours), a con- 
centration (15 hours), and a cognate (12 hours); 

2. complete at least 30 hours at the graduate-level with at 
least 21 hours at the 600-level; 

3. file a Candidacy Form with the Graduate College prior 
to the completion of 24 hours credit; 

4. successfully complete a comprehensive examination (may 
be taken no more than twice). 

M.S.T. Core 

Each candidate for the Master of Science in Teaching in Math- 
ematics must complete the following core (9 hours): 
MATH 632 Mathematical Problem Solving 
MATH 638 Current Trends in Mathematics Education 
MATH 690 Research In Mathematics Education 

Concentration: Middle Grade Mathematics 
Admission Requirements: 

A candidate for admission to the Master of Science in Teach- 
ing program with a concentration in Middle Grade Math- 
ematics must 

1 . hold a valid elementary teaching certificate; 

2. have one year teaching experience; 

3. submit three letters of recommendation; 

4. have an acceptable GRE or MAT score. (A GRE of 900 or 
an MAT of 44 is expected.) 

Any applicant not meeting these requirements may petition 
to the Mathematics Education Graduate Admissions Com- 
mittee. 

Degree Requirements: 

In addition to the core, students must complete the concen- 
tration and cognate as outlined below. 

Concentration 

Fifteen (15) hours selected from MATH 562, 610, 633, 634, 635 and 
other courses In the department selected In consultation with advisor. 

Cognate 

Twelve (1 2) hours In the College of Education (determined jointly by 
the Departments of Mathematical Sciences, Educational Leadership, and 
Elementary and Special Education). 

Concentration: Secondary Mathematics 
Admission Requirements 

A candidate for admission to the Master of Science in Teach- 
ing program with a concentration in Secondary Mathematics 
must 

1 . hold a valid secondary mathematics teaching certificate, 
or have completed 9 hours of mathematics past the cal- 
culus sequence;* 

2. have three years teaching or related work experience; 

3. submit three letters of recommendation; 

4. have an acceptable GRE or MAT score. (A GRE of 900 or 
an MAT of 44 is expected.) 

Any applicant not meeting these requirements may petition 
to the Mathematics Education Graduate Admissions Com- 
mittee. 



'NOTE: Candidates seeking initial licensure may be required to com- 
plete additional hours in mathematics and/or professional education. 
(An advisor should be consulted.) 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to the core, students must complete the concen- 
tration and cognate as outlined below. 

Concentration 

Fifteen (15) hours including STAT 519, MATH 617, and three other 
courses from the department selected In consultation with advisor. 

Cognate 

Twelve (1 2) hours In the College of Education (determined jointly by 
the Departments of Mathematical Sciences and Educational Leadership). 

Courses in Mathematics [MATH] 

501 Concepts of Mathematics. Three credits. Recommended for 
students preparing to become elementary school teachers. Top- 
ics include complex numbers, finite mathematical systems, lin- 
ear equations and Inequalities, functions and their graphs, in- 
troductory matrix algebra. Interest and consumer credit, and 
microcomputer applications in the mathematics classroom. 

527 Introduction to Topology. Three credits. Prerequisites: MATH 
222 and a previous upper-division course in which the student 
has been required to write proofs. Fundamental concepts of 
topology Including continuity, compactness, connectedness, 
separation axioms, and metric spaces. 

531/ Numerical Analysis I and II. Three credits each. Prerequisite: 
532 CSCI 31 8 or equivalent. Application of computer-oriented nu- 
merical algorithms to algebraic equations, differential and inte- 
gral equations, and linear algebra. Rigorous mathematical treat- 
ment of error included. 

539 Introduction to Mathematics of Investment. Three credits. 
(Same as ACSI 539.) Prerequisites: MATH 122 or 344 and one 
semester of probability/statistics or consent of instructor. Model 
and analyze Investments In bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other 
derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a 
function of Interest rate, developing formulas for duration and 
convexity to study the sensitivity of price to Interest rate, and 
mathematical modeling of Investor preference and attitude to- 
ward risk. 

542 Number Theory. Three credits. Divisibility congruences, qua- 
dratic residues, Diophantlne equations, quadratic forms, and 
continued fractions. 

547 Introduction to Modern Algebra. Three credits. A treatment of 
sets, relations, operations, and the construction of number sys- 
tems in algebra. 

551 Abstract Algebra I. Three credits. Introducesgroups with a brief 
introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields. 

553 Abstract Algebra II. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 451/551 . 
Theory of rings, fields, integral domains, matrices, and vector 
spaces. 

560 Problems In Contemporary Mathematics. One to six credits. 
Pass/Fall grading in specified sections. 

562 History and Philosophy of Mathematics. Three credits. 
Prerequisites: Background In geometry, number theory, and/or 
symbolic logic helpful. The character of mathematical thought 



Mathematical Sciences 119 



by way of mathematical problems which have occupied succes- 
sively the outstanding mathematicians of Babylon, Egypt, Greece 
China, the Renaissance, and modern times paralleled with a 
study of three schools of mathematical philosophy: intuitionism, 
logicism, and formalism. Open only to senior and graduate 
mathematics majors. 

570 Combinatorics and Graph Theory. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
MATH 312 or 308. Selected topics in combinatorics and graph 
theory emphasizing combinatorial problem solving and algo- 
rithmic proof. 

610 Mathematics for Teachers. Three credits. Mathematics as prob- 
lem solving, communication, and reasoning. Connecting differ- 
ent fields of mathematics. Topics include number and number 
relationships, number systems and number theory, computa- 
tion and estimation, patterns and functions, statistics and prob- 
ability, algebra, geometry, measurement. 

612 Advanced Linear Algebra. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 
31 2. Continuation of linear algebra topics in MATH 31 2 includ- 
ing advanced topics in inner product spaces and structure of 
linear operators. 

61 4A Selected Topics of Modern Mathematics: Algebra. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: MATH 553 or consent of instructor. Extension 
of previous work in algebra with emphasis on topics not treated 
in other courses. 

61 4B Selected Topics of Modern Mathematics: Analysis. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: MATH 620 or consent of instructor. Extension 
of previous work in analysis with emphasis on topics not treated 
in other courses. 

61 4C Selected Topics of Modern Mathematics: Topology. Three cred- 
its. Prerequisite: MATH 427/527 or consent of instructor. Exten- 
sion of previous work in topology with emphasis on topics not 
treated in other courses. 

61 7 Sets and Logic. Three credits. Includes topics in three catego- 
ries: 1 ) Propositions, predicates, quantifiers, truth tables, tautol- 
ogies, and methods of mathematical proof including mathemati- 
cal induction. 2) Sets, relations, functions, graphs, cardinality, 
and the Axiom of Choice. 3) Applications of these foundations 
to selected results in algebra and analysis as time permits. It is 
recommended that this course be taken early in the graduate 
program. 

619 Analysis I. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 425 or equiva- 
lent. Fundamental concepts of real analysis through rigorous 
treatment of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration 
in one dimension. 

620 Analysis II. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 619 or equiva- 
lent. A continuation of Analysis I. Basic theory of multi-dimen- 
sional calculus — limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, 
sequences, series, and convergence. 

621 Complex Variables. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 620. 
Theory of functions of complex variables and their application 
in mathematics and physics. 

623 Teaching of Introductory College Mathematics. Three credits. 
Foundations and pertinent topics in college algebra, trigonom- 
etry, analytic geometry, and calculus with emphasis on techniques 
of presentation. 

625 Real Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 620. Lebesgue 
measure and Lebesgue integral, convergence theorems, func- 



tions of bounded variation, absolute continuity, mean conver- 
gence. Introduction to abstract measure and integration theory. 

626 Advanced Differential Equations I. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
MATH 323 and 425. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of 
systems of differential equations. Gradient systems, Sturm- 
Liouville problems. Elementary techniques for boundary value 
problems of partial differential equations. 

627 Advanced Differential Equations II. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: MATH 626. Solution techniques for boundary value prob- 
lems. Problems involve heat, wave, and potential equations. 
Topics include the method of characteristics, series solutions, 
integral transforms, and Green's functions. 

630 Optimization. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 532 or con- 
sent of instructor. Constrained and unconstrained optimization 
problems, including the generalized least squares problem and 
Eigenvalue problems. Methods include orthogonalization, con- 
jugate gradient, and quasi-Newton algorithms. 

631 Control Theory. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 626 or con- 
sent of instructor. Vector space applications to system analysis; 
observability, controllability, and stabilization of systems; feed- 
back systems; Lyapunov methods; optimal control, and the cal- 
culus variations. 

632 Mathematical Problem Solving. Three credits. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. A basis for reflection on teaching and learn- 
ing mathematics. Problem-solving strategies and heuristics. Fo- 
cuses on all branches of mathematics, providing an opportunity 
to synthesize mathematical knowledge. 

633 Algebra for Teachers. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Review and extension of algebraic skills and concepts 
as they relate to the teaching and learning of algebra. Focus on 
algebraic thinking and problem solving, algebraic systems, func- 
tions, graphing, and linear algebra. 

634 Geometry for Teachers. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. Investigations into the foundations of plane, solid, 
and coordinate geometry, motion geometry, similarities and 
congruencies, measurement and the application of geometry. 
Instruction will model the suggested pedagogy appropriate for 
school mathematics. 

635 Probability and Statistics for Teachers. Three credits. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. Relation to school mathematics. 
Development of central tendency and variation, concepts of 
chance including sample space, randomness, conditional prob- 
ability, and independence. 

638 Current Trends in Mathematics Education. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. Innovative topics or critical 
issues related to the teaching and learning of mathematics. In- 
cluding but not limited to history of mathematics education, 
pedagogical content knowledge, assessment and evaluation, and 
technologies. 

640 Advanced Geometry. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 307 
or consent of instructor. Detailed study of one or more of the 
various branches of geometry including non-Euclidean geom- 
etry, projective geometry, algebraic geometry, and differential 
geometry. 

641 Computer-Aided Geometric Design. Three credits. Prerequi- 
sites: MATH 532 and 640 or consent of instructor. Parametric 
curves and surfaces; Bezier and B-spline interpolation and ap- 
proximation techniques; visual smoothness and parameteriza- 



1 20 Mathematical Sciences 



tion for curves; Coons, Bezier and triangular patches; scattered 
data methods. 

651 Advanced Algebra. Three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 553. 
Polynomial rings, theory of fields, vector spaces and intermedi- 
ate group theory necessary for Galois theory, and Galois theory. 

660 Problems in Mathematics. One to nine credits (in 660 A-L). 
Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area, 
and normally nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems 
course dealing with theory methods and applications. 

A. Advanced Calculus 

B. Number Theory 

G. Mathematics of Finance 

H. Mathematics of Life Contingencies 

I. Numerical Analysis 

J. Topology 

K. Abstract Algebra 

L. Combinatorics and Graph Theory 

661 Introduction to Graduate Study. Two credits. 

664 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research prob- 
lem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of 
data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading, 

670 Advanced Combinatorics and Graph Theory. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: MATH 470/570. Selected topics in combinatorics 
and graph theory extending topics studied in MATH 470/570. 

690 Research in Mathematics Education. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of instructor. An examination of factors influ- 
encing research and critical analyses of selected research in math- 
ematics education. Studies representing different methodolo- 
gies critiqued. 

706 Independent Study. One to nine credits. 

Courses in Statistics [STAT] 

513 Applied Statistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: 2 years of high 
school algebra or equivalent. Topics include descriptive statis- 
tics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit cov- 
ers means proportions and variances for one and two samples, 
one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square 
analysis, and topics in nonparametrics. 

514 Probability and Statistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 51 3 
or equivalent. Topics include multiple regression, variance com- 
ponent estimation, experimental design, covariate analysis, chi- 
square analysis, multiple comparisons, and nonparametrics. The 
experimental design topics include two-way ANOVA, factorial 
experiments, nested designs, and split plot designs. 

519 Mathematical Statistics II. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 31 5 
or equivalent. Theory of statistical inference. Topics include sam- 
pling distributions, decision theory, estimation, test of hypoth- 
esis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and selected ap- 
plications. 

520 Statistical Methods for Forecasting. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: STAT 419. Application of the regression model in forecast- 
ing regression and exponential smoothing methods to forecast 
nonseasonal time-series, seasonal series and globally constant 
seasonal models, stochastic time series models; and forecast 
evaluation. (Prepares actuarial science students for the Society 



of Actuaries Exam #1 20 and Exam Part 3A administered by the 
Casualty Actuarial Society.) 

536 Regression Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 315 or 
equivalent. Theory and application of regression models. Ap- 
proaches to model building and data analysis treated. Compu- 
tation and interpretation of results facilitated through use of sta- 
tistical software packages. 

537 Nonparametric Statistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 315 
or equivalent. Statistical tests that require no assertions about 
parameters or about the form of the population from which the 
samples are drawn. A wide range of practical problems. 

538 Experimental Design. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 315 or 
equivalent. Topics include one-way analysis of variance, multi- 
ple comparison, multifactor analysis of variance, and various 
practical issues in experimental design. Computation and inter- 
pretation of results are facilitated through the use of statistical 
software packages. 

560 Problems in Statistics. One to six credits. Prerequisites: Senior 
standing and consent of instructor. Students wishing to enroll 
must submit a written course/topic proposal to the department 
prior to the semester in which STAT 560 is taken. Proposal must 
be approved prior to student taking the course. At the conclu- 
sion of the course, each enrollee must submit a written report 
to the department. 

61 6 Statistics. Three credits. Mathematical statistics and applications, 
discrete and continuous data, statistical inferences. 

618 Statistical Inference. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 616 or 
permission of instructor. Theory of estimation and hypothesis 
tests. Topics include minimum variance unbiased estimation, 
methods of estimation, most powerful tests, likelihood ratio tests, 
decision theory, and sequential test procedures. 

660 Problems in Statistics. One to nine credits (in 660 C-F). Pre- 
requisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area and 
(normally) nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems 
course dealing with theory, methods, and applications. 

C. Mathematical Statistics 

D. Regression Analysis 

E. Non-parametric Statistics 

F. Experimental Design 

Courses in Actuarial Science [ACSI] 

500 Calculus and Linear Algebra. Three credits. Prerequisites: MATH 
222, 312, and 425 or consent of instructor. Offers preparation 
for Exam #1 00 jointly administered by the Society of Actuaries 
and the Casualty Actuarial Society. 

505 Mathematics of Risk Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
ACSI 439/539. For students obtaining a concentration in Actu- 
arial Science. Offers preparation for Exam Nos. 5 and 6 admin- 
istered by the Society of Actuaries under the new content re- 
quirements of the Society effective January 2000. Topics include 
mathematical modeling of volatility; pricing of bonds, stocks, 
and other derivatives with uncertainty; benchmark portfolios; 
asset/liability management for property/casualty insurers; liabil- 
ity associated with a financially distressed company. Heath- 
Jarrow-Morton and Cox-lngersoll-Ross models will be studied. 

506 Mathematics of Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 

Three credits. Prerequisites: ACSI 439/539 and 405/505. For 
students obtaining a concentration in Actuarial Science. Offers 
preparation for Exam Nos. 5 and 6 administered by the Society 



121 



of Actuaries under the new content requirements effective Jano 
ary 2000. Topics include risk management using options, inter- 
est rate swaps, interest rate caps. Black- Scholes analysis, Taylor 
series expansion to obtain hedge parameters, portfolio insur- 
ance, numerical procedures, interest rate derivatives, and use 
of Black's model. 

Probability and Statistics. Three credits. Prerequisites: STAT 
419 or consent of instructor. Offers preparation for Exam #110 
jointly administered by the Society of Actuaries and the Casu- 
alty Actuarial Society. 

Introduction to Mathematics of Investment. Three credits. 
(Same as MATH 539.) Prerequisites: MATH 1 22 or 344 and one 
semester of probability/statistics or consent of instructor. Model 
and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other 
derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a 
function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and 
convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and 
mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude to- 
ward risk. 

Mathematics of Compound Interest. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: 5 hours of calculus. Mathematical theory of investments 
and finance relating to bonds, annuities, insurance, compound 
interest etc. Recommended for students preparing for actuarial 
examination. 

Actuarial Mathematics I. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACSI 540 
or consent of instrurtor. Introduction to the mathematics of life 
insurance. Topics include measurement of mortality; life annu- 
ities, life insurance benefits and premiums; net level premium 
reserves, elementary loading and cash value formulas; special 
annuity and insurance benefits; population theory including the 
expectation of life function; multi-life functions, including joint- 
life and last survivor statuses, multiple-decrement functions, in- 
cluding multiple-decrement (service) and associated single dec- 
rement tables. 

Actuarial Mathematics II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ACSI 448. 
This is the second course of a two-semester sequence; offers 
preparation for the Society of Actuaries Exam #1 50 or Exam 
Part 4A of the Casualty Actuarial Society. Topics chosen from 
net premium reserves, multiple life functions, multiple decre- 
ment models, valuation theory and pension plans, and insur- 
ance models, (including expenses, and nonforfeiture benefits 
and dividends). 

Mathematics of Compound Interest and Life Contingencies. 

Three credits. Prerequisites: ACSI 440 or 449 or consent of in- 
structor. Theory of Interest and Actuarial Mathematics. Offers 
preparation for the Society of Actuaries Exam #150 or Exam 
Part 4A of the Casualty Actuarial Society. Topics chosen from 
valuation theory of pension plans, insurance models, and non- 
forfeiture benefits and dividends. 

Problems in Actuarial Science. One to six credits. Prerequi- 
sites: Senior standing and consent of instructor. Students wish- 
ing to enroll must submit a written course/topic proposal to the 
department prior to the semester in which ACSI 560 is taken. 
The proposal must be approved prior to student taking the 
course. At the conclusion of this course, each enrollee must sub- 
mit a written report to the department. 

Credibility Theory and Loss Distributions. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: STAT 519 or consent of instructor. Prepares students 
for Exam Part 4B of the Casualty Actuarial Society. Topics in- 
clude Bayes Theorem and its relationship to credibility theory 
and analysis of statistical distributions for modeling insurance 
claims by size. 



Department of 
Music 



Roger Kugler, Chair 
Wright Music Building 150 

The Department of Music offers a Master of Arts de- 
gree in Music with specializations in conducting, music 
education, music theory/composition, and performance. 
A minor in music is offered at the graduate level. 

Applicants seeking admission to the Master of Arts de- 
gree must submit scores of the Miller Analogies Test or 
the Graduate Record Exam. Candidates must have com- 
pleted an undergraduate degree in music. 

An audition is required of all students entering a gradu- 
ate degree program in music. Students who do not pass 
the audition must register for MUAP 502, Private In- 
struction, until the audition requirements are satisfied. 
Students must perform an audition by the end of the 
first semester of study. 

A music theory examination and a music history assess- 
ment are required of all candidates for admission. These 
assessments will be scheduled during the first week of 
class of the first semester of study. Students not meet- 
ing proficiency requirements are required to take addi- 
tional course work. Any course work necessary to meet 
proficiency requirements does not count towards the 
M.A. degree. 

Requirements for tiie Master of Arts 

1 . The Master of Arts degree in Music has three (3) options. 
The thesis option requires a minimum of 30 semester 
hours including the thesis. The recital option requires a 
minimum of 30 semester hours including the recital. 
Music education students are not eligible for the recital 
option. The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 36 
semester hours. No more than 30 percent of the total 
degree hours may be dually listed (undergraduate/gradu- 
ate) courses. 

2. Six semester hours of a foreign language are required 
with the thesis/recital option. This requirement may be 
satisfied by undergraduate credits (with a grade of C or 
better) or by approved foreign language hours (with a 
grade of C or better) in the student's graduate program. 

3. Two semesters of ensemble participation are required. 
No more than two hours of credit in ensembles may be 
applied toward the M.A. degree. 

4. Prior to the completion of 24 semester hours, a Candi- 
dacy Form must be filed with the Graduate Office. 

5. Candidates must pass both written and oral comprehen- 
sive examinations. These examinations are scheduled 



122 Music 



during the student's last semester of study. Comprehen- 
sive examinations may be taken no more than twice. 
6. Students choosing the recital option must complete 18 
hours of course work before enrolling in MUAP 667, 
Graduate Recital. 

Candidates for the M.A. degree in Music elect an area of 
specialization in one of the following: conducting; music 
education; music theory/composition; or performance. 

All graduate students in the Master of Arts degree in Music 
take 12 hours of required core classes. 12 hours in the area 
of specialization, and 6 hours (12 hours, non-thesis/recital 
option) of electives. 

Required Core Classes (12 hours) 

MUHL 604 Twentieth-Century Music, 3 hours 
MUTH 605 Analytical Techniques, 3 hours 
MUSI 650 Aesthetics of the Arts, 3 hours 
MUSI 662 Bibliography and Research, 3 hours 

Areas of Specialization (12 hours) 

MUED 601 Foundations of Music Education, 3 hours 
MUSI 606 Advanced Conducting, 3 hours 

and 6 hours from the following: 
MUED 521 General Music Program K-6, 2 hours 
MUED 522 Middle School Music, 2 hours 
MUED 523 Secondary School Methods and Materials, 2 hours 
MUED 524 Instrumental Rehearsal Problems, 2 hours 
MUED 525 Advanced Marching Techniques, 2 hours 

Music Theory/Composition Specialization 

MUTH 614, 

615,616 Composition, 9 hours 
MUAP 667 Graduate Recital, 3 hours 

Performance Specialization 

MUAP 667 Graduate Recital, 3 hours 
MUAP 668, 
669, 670 Private Instruction, 9 hours 

Conducting Specialization 

MUEN 570 Ensemble, 2 hours 

MUSI 603 Conducting Problems and Score Interpretation, 2 hours 

MUSI 606 Advanced Conducting, 3 hours 

MUAP 667 Graduate Recital, 3 hours 

and 2 hours from the following: 
MUHL 568 Choral Literature, 2 hours 
MUED 524 Instrumental Rehearsal Problems, 2 hours 



Courses in Music [MUSI] 

503 A-Z Problems in Music. Two credits. Independent study con- 
ducted on selected music topics. (A maximum of six semester 
hours may be applied toward a degree.) 

527 Music Internship. Three to six credits. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. Examination and experiences in either the area of 
music industry, music education, or instrumental or choral con- 
ducting. 

557 The Body Intelligent: A Study of the Alexander Technique. 

Two credits. (Same as SPEE 557.) For those interested in im- 
proving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support, flex- 
ibility, and coordination in daily activity. 

603 Conducting Problems and Score Interpretation. Two credits. 
Analysis and marking of scores. Refinement of conducting tech- 
niques. Elimination of undesirable conducting habits. Diction 
as applied to conducting. 

606 Advanced Conducting. Three credits. Techniques in advanced 
conducting of orchestral, choral, band, and chamber ensem- 
bles. Includes irregular meters, score reading, warm-up proce- 
dures, conducting patterns, attacks, and releases. 

650 Aesthetics of the Arts. Three credits. (Same as ART 650.) The 
place of aesthetics in philosophy, the properties of music and 
the visual arts, the alternative and corollary views of the arts, the 
process of aesthetic creation, and meaning and values in music 
and the visual arts. 

662 Bibliography and Research. Three credits. Survey of bibliog- 
raphy and problems and methods of research. Analysis and evalu- 
ation of research in the arts. 

664 Thesis Research. Three credits. Types of research in music sur- 
veyed. A problem is selected and developed into a thesis report 
in acceptable form and style. Once enrolled, student should 
register for at least one credit hour of master's research each 
semester until completion. S/U grading. 

671 Special Studies. One, two, or three credits. Intensive study of cho- 
sen subject An indication of a reasonable skill and knowledge of 
research techniques, writing, and creativeness is expected. 

A. Special Studies. One credit 

B. Special Studies. Two credits. 

C. Special Studies. Three credits. 



Electives (6 hours thesis/recital option or 12 hours non-thesis option) QQ^^rseS In Applied Music [MUAP] 





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502 Private Instruction. Two credits. One hour lesson weekly on 
one of the various instruments or voice. Offers preparation to 
entering graduates for the graduate audition. Does not count 
toward the graduate degree; may be repeated. 

504 Service Playing. Two credits. Skills and knowledge necessary 
for playing for church services including hymn and anthem ac- 
companiments, conducting from the console, study of liturgical 
service music, solo accompaniments, and church music materials. 

510 Private Instruction. One credit. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. One half-hour private lesson weekly on one of the vari- 
ous instruments or voice. May be repeated. 

614/ Composition. Three credits each. Development of skills and 
615/ ability in handling musical materials with goals of some indi- 
61 6 vidual style or expression within the framework of current prac- 
tices. Taken in consecutive order. 



Music 123 



667 Graduate Recital. Three credits. Prerequisites: Completion of 
MUAP 668, 669, 670; or MUAP 61 4, 61 5, 61 6; or MUSI 603, 
606; permission of the appropriate music faculty. 

668 Private Instruction. Three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 
undergraduate recital. Consult graduate coordinator as to per- 
formance area availability. One-hour private lesson per week in 
the selected performance field. In-depth study of stylistic, tech- 
nical, and musical problems in music performance and explo- 
ration of advanced repertoire in the applied area. 

A. Private Instruction Voice 

B. Private Instruction Piano 

C. Private Instruction Organ 

D. Private Instruction Brass 

E. Private Instruction Winds 

F. Private Instruction Strings 

C. Private Instruction Percussion 
I. Private Instruction Guitar 

669 Private Instruction. Three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 
undergraduate recital. Consult graduate coordinator as to per- 
formance area availability. One-hour private lesson per week in 
the selected performance field. In-depth study of stylistic, tech- 
nical, and musical problems in music performance and explo- 
ration of advanced repertoire in the applied area. 

A. Private Instruction Voice 

B. Private Instruction Piano 

C. Private Instruction Organ 

D. Private Instruction Brass 

E. Private Instruction Winds 

F. Private Instruction Strings 

C. Private Instruction Percussion 
I. Private Instruction Guitar 

670 Private Instruction. Three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 
undergraduate recital. Consult graduate coordinator as to per- 
formance area availability. One-hour private lesson per week in 
the selected performance field. In-depth study of stylistic, tech- 
nical, and musical problems in music performance and explo- 
ration of advanced repertoire in the applied area. Course may 
be repeated with no limit, but only three hours of credit may be 
applied toward the degree within the nine-hour private instruc- 
tion requirement. 

A. Private Instruction Voice 

B. Private Instruction Piano 

C. Private Instruction Organ 

D. Private Instruction Brass 

E. Private Instruction Winds 
R Private Instruction Strings 

C. Private Instruction Percussion 
I. Private Instruction Guitar 



Courses in Music Education [MUED] 

500 A-Z Problems in Music Education. One or two credits. A maxi- 
mum of 6 semester hours credit may be applied toward a de- 
gree (course may be repeated). 

521 General Music Program K-6. Two credits. The role of music 
and music teaching in elementary education; its objectives, 
methods, materials, and procedures; innovative trends and ex- 
emplary practices; evaluative techniques. 

522 Middle School Music. Two credits. The role of music and music 
teaching in middle school education; its objectives, methods 
materials, and procedures; innovative trends and exemplary 
practices; evaluative techniques. 



523 Secondary School Methods and Materials. Two credits. The 
role of music and music teaching in secondary education; its 
objectives, methods, materials, and procedures; innovative 
trends and exemplary practices; evaluative techniques. 

524 Instrumental Rehearsal Problems. Two credits. Improving 
teaching in instrumental music classes through a study of re- 
hearsal planning and techniques; the interpretation of music to 
students; group dynamics. 

525 Advanced Marching Techniques. Two credits. Prerequisite: 
Marching band class. Further development and application of 
marching band techniques as utilized in half-time and contest 
show production. Selection and analysis of the music score. 

567 Music for the Young Child. Four credits. Music fundamentals, 
materials, and methods appropriate for pre-school through 
grades three; pantomine, role playing, improvisation, rhythm, 
movement, listening, and singing. 

601 Foundations of Music Education. Three credits. Philosophies 
of music education; meaning in music and aesthetic theories; 
principles of learning; objectives for music education. 

Courses in Music Ensemble [MUEN] 

570 Ensemble. One credit each semester. Study and public perform- 
ance of music literature appropriate to the ensemble. May take 
two times for credit. 

A. Guitar Ensemble 

B. Trombone Ensemble 

C. Clarinet Ensemble 

D. Trumpet Ensemble 

E. Horn Ensemble 
F Tuba Ensemble 
G. Flute Ensemble 

I. Chamber Ensemble 
J. Choral Ensemble 
K. Keyboard Ensemble 
L. Graduate Wind Ensemble 
M. Percussion Ensemble 
N. Saxophone Ensemble 
R Brass Ensemble 



Courses in Music History and Literature [MUHL] 

505 Church Music. Two credits. Survey of church music and various 
denominational worship traditions, hymnology, graded choir 
programs, handbell choirs, materials and methods of church 
music, and administration and organization of church music. 

506 Survey of Guitar Literature. Two credits. Basic literature for the 
guitar from the Renaissance to the present. Analysis, listening, 
research, performance. 

507 Music History Survey. Three credits. Review of music in history 
and culture to degree necessary for candidate to pursue work 
on graduate level. 

563 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Music. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. A survey of Western classical 
music during the Baroque and Classical periods; emphasis on 
topics selected by the instructor. 

564 Nineteenth Century Music. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. A survey of Western classical music during the 
Romantic period; emphasis on topics selected by the instructor. 



124 Music 



566 American Music. Three credits. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. A survey of American music from the colonial era to 
the present; added emphasis on topics selected by the instruc- 
tor. Examines folk, popular, and art, as well as sacred and secu- 
lar traditions within their cultural contexts. 

568 Choral Literature. Two credits. Examination of choral literature 
from the Renaissance to the present. Program selection. Analy- 
sis of choral pieces. 

569 Piano Literature. Two credits. Survey of the basic literature of 
the harpsichord and piano from the eighteenth century to the 
present. Live performance; analysis and research. 

571 Vocal Literature. Three credits. Basic repertory of Italian airs, 
German lieder, French art song, and solo vocal works of nation- 
alistic schools, as well as English and American song literature. 

572 Organ Literature. Two credits. A chronological study of organ 
literature from the Medieval period to the present. Objectives 
include knowledge of the repertoire and composers and his- 
torical perspective of styles and organ building. 

573 Brass Literature. Two credits. A chronological study of brass 
literature from the Renaissance period to the present. Objec- 
tives include knowledge of the repertoire and composers, his- 
torical perspective of styles, types, and common performance 
practice. 

574 Percussion Literature. Two credits. A chronological study of 
percussion literature from the nineteenth century to the present. 
Objectives include knowledge of the repertoire and compos- 
ers, historical perspective of styles, types, and common perfor- 
mance practice. 

575 String Literature. Two credits. A chronological study of string 
literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Objec- 
tives include knowledge of the repertoire and its composers, 
historical perspective of styles, types, and common performance 
practice. 

576 Woodwind Literature. Two credits. A chronological study of 
woodwind literature from the Renaissance period to the present. 
Objectives include knowledge of the repertoire and compos- 
ers, historical perspective of styles, types, and common perfor- 
mance practice. 

604 Twentieth-Century Music. Three credits. Styles and composi- 
tional techniques found in representative masterworks of the 
twentieth century from Debussy to present. Analysis, listening, 
research. Required of all master's candidates in music. 

Courses in Music Pedagogy [MUPD] 

511 Advanced Brass Pedagogy. Two credits. Advanced study of con- 
ceptual, physiological, acoustical, pedagogical methods and 
materials used in the teaching of beginning, intermediate, and 
advanced brass students. 

512 Advanced Percussion Pedagogy. Two credits. Advanced study 
of conceptual, physiological, acoustical, pedagogical methods 
and materials used in the teaching of beginning, intermediate, 
and advanced percussion students. 

513 Advanced String Pedagogy. Two credits. Advanced study of con- 
ceptual, physiological, acoustical, pedagogical methods and 
materials used in the teaching of beginning, intermediate, and 
advanced string students. 



514 Advanced Woodwind Pedagogy. Two credits. Advanced study 
of conceptual, physiological, acoustical, pedagogical methods 
and materials used in the teaching of beginning, intermediate, 
and advanced woodwind students. 

530 Diction for Singers II. Three credits. Lecture demonstration 
course for familiarization of the International Phonetic Alpha- 
bet and correct pronunciation of a variety of texts in English, 
Italian, German, and French. 

531 Vocal Pedagogy. Two credits. Teaching techniques of the fun- 
damentals of singing. Vocalizes and repertoire. Physical aspects 
of singing. 

532 Piano Pedagogy. Two credits. Various technical and philosophical 
approaches in teaching piano. Examination of teaching repertory 
through intermediate level. Supervised teaching through inter- 
mediate level. 

533 Organ Pedagogy. Two credits. The principles of teaching or- 
gan: manual and pedal techniques, organ methods, and organ 
repertoire of varying degrees of difficulty and of all period-styles 
from pre-Bach through twentieth century. 

634 Woodwind Teaching. Two credits. Seminar on problems en- 
countered in advanced instruction of woodwinds. Experimenta- 
tion and performance involving old and new concepts of per- 
formance. 

635 Brass Teaching. Two credits. Teaching materials for trumpet, 
cornet, horn, trombone, baritone, and tuba; elementary and 
advanced exercises, etudes; methods for class and private in- 
struction, clef and transposition studies, orchestral and band 
repertoire. Surveyofsourcesprovidingannouncement and evalu- 
ation of new materials. 



Courses in Music Theory [MUTH] 

501 Theory Survey. Two credits. A review of musicianship skills and 
knowledge of musical theory to the degree necessary for the 
candidate to pursue work of graduate level. 

518 Improvisation. Two credits. Lecture demonstration course ex- 
ploring improvisation, musical vocabularies, and shorthands in- 
cluding figured bass, Nashville shorthand, and other contempo- 
rary styles of writing and performing. 

519 Principles and Practices of Electronic Music. Three credits. 
Includes history and techniques, acoustics, electronic sound gen- 
eration, recording, operation of audio equipment, basic prin- 
ciples of composition, and experience with tape recorders and 
a music synthesizer. Open to non-music majors with permission 
of instructor. 

529 Electronic Music II. Three credits. Prerequisite: MUTH 519. 
Advanced principles of digital sound synthesis, programming the 
digital synthesizer, electronic composition, contemporary trends 
in digital music, and programming with a MIDI work station. 

605 Analytical Techniques. Three credits. Prerequisite: MUTH 501 
or permission of instructor. Skills and procedures of musical 
analysis as they apply to all periods through analysis of repre- 
sentative compositions. Evaluation of work from all standpoints: 
craftsmanship, expression, and stylistic correctness. 



125 



Department 
of Physics 
and Astronomy 



Robert F. Carlton, Chair 
Wiser-Patten Science Building 219 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers a mi- 
nor at the graduate level. 

Courses in Physics [PHYS] 

Graduate standing and consent of instructor are prerequi- 
sites for graduate courses in physics. 

531 Electricity and Magnetism. Three credits. Topics including elec- 
tric and magnetic fields, electrostatic potential, and potential 
energy and fields in matter discussed in a mathematically rigor- 
ous manner. A variety of good applications of mathematical 
methods in physics. 

538 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. Three credits. Origin of 
quantum theory; wave packets and deBroglie waves; Heisen- 
berg uncertainty principles. Schroedinger wave equation, op- 
erators, eigenfunctions, square well potential, the harmonic os- 
cillator, the hydrogen atom, molecular binding and molecular 
spectra. 

633 Principles of Modern Physics. Three credits. Charged particles 
and their behaviors; electronic structures of the atoms; nuclear 

I structures and processes; and radiation. 

634 Fundamentals of Physics. Six credits. Basic laws and principles 
of classical and modern physics. Lecture topics and laboratory 
experiences designed to advance student's knowledge of phys- 
ics. 




Department of 
Political Science 



John Vile, Chair 
Peck Hall 209 

The Department of Political Science offers a minor at 
the graduate level. 

Courses in Political Science [P S] 

500 Quantitative Methods of Research. Three credits. (Same as SOC 
500.) Fundamentals of quantitative methods in empirical re- 
search problems in the social sciences. PS/SOC 500 is a prereq- 
uisite for PS/SOC 511 . 

502 Political Science Laboratory. Three credits. Research, statistics, 
data processing, or simulation studies related to political and 
social questions. 

505 Introduction to City and Regional Planning. Three credits. Anal- 
ysis of the basis of particular forms in urban settlements and 
regions; introduction to planning history, theory, methods, pro- 
cesses, and current trends. 

506 The U.S. Congress. Three credits. An analysis of the United 
States Congress. The origins of the congress, political power, 
the nature of the institutionalized congress, campaigns, elec- 
tions. 

511 Quantitative Methods of Research. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: PS/SOC 500. (Same as SOC 51 1 .) Fundamentals of quan- 
titative methods in empirical research problems in the social 
sciences. 

512 Tennessee Government. Three credits. Structure, functions, and 
processes of Tennessee's governmental and political institutions. 
Policy issues studied. 

520 Problems in Government. Three credits. Work done on a tuto- 
rial basis under the close direction of a professor. Student must 
present a proposal for departmental consideration and accep- 
tance before enrolling in this course. 

521 International Relations. Three credits. National power, balance 
of power, nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, war as an in- 
strument of national policy, economic instruments of national 
policy, diplomacy, collective security, international law, and or- 
ganization. 

522 World Politics. Three credits. Experiencing contemporary in- 
ternational politics through the medium of simulation. Particu- 
lar focus areas include the U.S., former Soviet Union, People's 
Republic of China, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southern 
Africa. 

523 Political Theory. Three credits. Western political theory from 
the early Creeks to the beginning of the modern world. Includes 
Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, the church-state controversies, feudal- 
ism, Machiavelli, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, 
the early nationalists, Hobbes. 



126 Political Science 



524 American Foreign Policy. Three credits. Foreign policies in the 
nuclear age from Kennan and containnfient to the present with 
emphasis on contemporary problems and policies. 

525 Public Administration. Three credits. Fundamentals of public 
management— organization theory, leadership, policy making, 
planning, budgeting, personnel, administrative law, bureaucratic 
behavior. 

526 Public Administration. Three credits. Selected issues and prob- 
lems. Normally entails the application of administrative con- 
cepts to administrative problems and learning by doing. 

528 State and Local Government. Three credits. Ftolitics and adminis- 
tration at the state and local level. Legislative, judicial, and ad- 
ministrative structures and processes; major issues and prob- 
lems. 

530 Comparative European Governments. Three credits. Compara- 
tive analysis of the governmental forms and practices of Eng- 
land, France, Germany the European Community, and others. 

532 Public Opinion and Propaganda. Three credits. The nature of 
pubic opinion and its role in the political and social process; 
myths, symbols, other instruments; techniques of propaganda. 

533 Politics and the Party System. Three credits. The nature of 
democracy, politics, and political parties; party organization and 
role in government; campaigning, primaries, conventions, gen- 
eral elections; the electoral college; voting behavior and pres- 
sure groups. 

536 Legislative Internship. Twelve credits. A cooperative program 
with the state of Tennessee which provides for student service 
with the legislature on a full-time basis during the spring semes- 
ter. Students selected on a competitive basis. Only six hours 
may count toward the degree for graduate programs. 

537/ American Constitutional Law. Three credits each. The Supreme 

538 Court as a policy-making body in the governmental system. 

Emphasis on case studies in major areas of conflict including 

federalism, civil liberties, criminal procedure, and economic 

regulation. 

540 Municipal Government. Three credits. The structure, powers, 
functions, and politics of municipal governments from the stand- 
point of city management. Attention is given to problems of 
municipal policy implementation. 

541 Business and Government. Three credits. Government's role 
in regulating and supporting business and its impact on the eco- 
nomic health of the private sector. Analyses of the business- 
government relationship at the federal, state, and local levels. 
The new role of organized consumers.* 

544 Governmental Budgeting and Finance Administration. Three 
credits. Analysis of the legal and social nature of government 
budgets emphasizing the procedures and administrative meth- 
ods of fiscal control. Study of budget documents at state and 
local levels.* 

550 International Law. Three credits. General principles of modern 
international law taught by the case study method in a seminar 
format encouraging debate and discussion. Issues concerning 
the development of international law and human rights. 

551 International Political Economy. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
P S 122 and 321 or permission of instructor. The relationship 
between politics and economics in international affairs and its 



implications for global peace, security, the ecology, and social ][ 
welfare. 

559 Administrative Law. Three credits. Procedural aspects, substan- 
tive issues, judicial review of the type of law concerned with the 
powers and procedures of government agencies and the rights 
of citizens affected by them. 

563 Personnel Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: P S 325 
or permission of instructor. The development and characteris- 
tics of public personnel administration in the United States with 
attention to recruitment, selection, position classification, com- 
pensation, performance evaluation, promotion, motivation, 
morale, discipline, separation, and public service unionism.* 

570 American Political Thought. Three credits. Major thinkers